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Brethren's Family Almanac, 




Great Mechanical Wonders 

3 BIG WATCH BARGAINS. 

Order one for the boys. They are 
marvels of cheapness and utility. No- 
where else do you find such bargains as 
these. No wonder I sell large num- 
bers of them. Read the descriptions 
carefully. 

No. 121.— For Boys. Beautiful 
nickel-plated open-face case, stem- 
wind and stem-set; white Roman dia^ 
and genuine American works, tested, 
timed, regulated and warranted at 
the low price of only $i.75i post-paid. 

No. 73.~An Exceptionally hand= 
some Watch for Boys and Men. 

Fine nickel-plated open-face case, 
beautifully engraved and fitted with 
first-class gilded American movement. 
Each Watch stem-wind and stem-set; 
has jeweled balance and is warranted 
an accurate timekeeper. Don't fail 
to order one of these Watches if you 
want good value for your money. It's 
the best Watch in the world for the 
price,— only $2.50, post-paid. 

No. 73/^— A good Iow=priced Ladies' Watch.— Same 

general design as No. 'j'i, but smaller size for ladies' wear. 
Price, $2.60, post-paid. Also see No. 25^^ and No. 77 below. 





"Lady Elgins." 




Finest 7-jeweled genuine Elgin move- 
ments in silverine and solid silver cases. 
Exceptionally fine Watches for ladies' 
wear. Note carefully my low prices. 



No. 25J^. Silverine 
Open-Face. 

No. 77.— Beautiful solid silver hunt=> 
ing case Elgin Watch. One of the 
prettiest silver Watches you ever saw. 
Assorted patterns, rich hand-engraved. 
7-jeweled nickel Elgin works, stem-wind 
and stem-set, warranted one year^ and 
only $8.55, post-paid. 



No. 25^^. — Handsomely-engraved sil- 
verine open=face. case. New model 7- 
jeweled nickel Elgin works, stem-wind 
and stem-set, warranted one year, and 

sent by registered mail for or^iy I6.40, 
post-paid. 




No. /7. Solid silver- 
Hunting Case. 



Elgin works are known the world 
over, and ladies purchasing either of 
these Watches will never regret this in- 
vestment of their money. 

Address all orders to 

H. E. NEWCOMER, 

Lock Box 325. Mount Morris 




" Elgin, Waltham and Hampden movements cost less 
repairs, keep better time and wear longer than any other 
watches in the world." 

•..Something Extra Fine... 




ABOUT ONE=HALF PRICE, 



i 



No. loi. For gentleman's wean One of the best watches 
in America. i7=jeweled Hampden. No better time-pieces 
made. Gold cases cost more money but it's good works you 
need most. 

This watch guaranteed to wear equal to any watch in 
America costing double my price. Your jeweler doesn't sell 
it for $10. You can't afford to miss it for $10, My price is 
too low, but I sell large numbers of them— that's the reason. 

Description of Movement. — Nickel, beautifully damas- 
keened, 17 bright ruby Jewels with five pairs in settings, 
sunk second and circle dial, Roman figures and seconds, bre- 
quet hair-spring, compensation balance, steel patent regula- 
tor, patent center pinion and regular " Hampden " main- 
spring. 

The case is plain polished, 3-ounce, solid silverine, open- 
face, dust=pro6f , stem-wind and stem-set. Screw back and 
screw bezel. No better cases made. They will wear a life- 
time. 

And the price of this watch, all complete, only $10, by mail 
or express prepaid. Warranted one year end entire satis= 
faction guaranteed. 

SPECIAL NOTICE.— Some men prefer Elgin movements, 
and if you wish you may have I7=jeweled Elgin works in 
gilt, same grade as above (and adjusted) at same price. But 
be sure to mention Elgin works if you prefer them. 

These are positively the best %\q watches now on sale and 
every reader of the Almanac should avail himself of the op- 
portunity to purchase one while the price is low. I guaran- 
tee entire satisfaction or money refunded. 

Address your orders to 

H. E. NEWCOMER, 

Lock Box 325. Mount Morris, III, 

^@P*A beautiful and valuable premium goes free with 
each of these $10 watches if you will kindly mention Breth- 
ren's Almanac. 



Brethreris Family Almanac. 



FREE HOMES IN NORTH DAKOTA. 



Hundreds of Brethren have already located in that State, and there is still room for others. Many 
church societies have been organized and newcomers are not deprived of educational advantages. The 
original and principal settlements are along the Great Northern Railway in the Turtle Mountain and 
Devils Lake districts, where there are still free lands open to homeseekers. The Railway Company has no 
grant in that State and therefore no land for sale. Men who are renting high-priced Eastern land that they 
can never hope to own, or else have farms too small to support their families, still have an opportunity to get 
a piece of Uncle Sam's estate, large enough to make each of them well off. Government land of real agri- 
cultural value is being rapidly taken, and the man who wants good free land and puts off getting it very long 
will hear the old refrain, "Too late," when he begins to search. 

For printed matter and information about rates, routes, etc., address, 

220 South Clark St., 

CHICAGO. ILL. 



FREE LANDS IN MONTANA... 

There are chances yet to take up homesteads in the Milk River Valley of Montana, within sight 
and hearing of trains on the Great Northern Railway. The land produces all the staple grain and 
root crops, and, besides, it is the best live stock country in the world. 

The railroad follows the river for 180 miles, and there is room for hundreds of families. In time, 
farms there will be as valuable as those in the Mississippi Valley. Now they are free. There will 
be some new towns springing up too. 

In Montana the settler can take his choice of claims, either homestead or pre-emption, or both, 
as follows: 

ISO ^ok.:bs o:f HionyniESTE^iD. 

No cost, except fee for entry and final papers at U. S. Land Office, 

160 ^^OE^ES OIF" ZPE^E-EnVLiFTZOISr 

^^^^ Cost $1.25 an acre — 25 cents down per acre, and $1 at end of four years 

Or the homeseeker can take 320 acres at a cost of $1.25 an acre, one-fifth down and the balance 
in four years. 

Homesteads must be occupied and improved by claimants. Homesteads are not taxed by the 
State until patent is issued at the end of five years. Land pre-empted must be improved, but need not 
be occupied as a residence, as in the case of homesteads, and is not taxable until after four years, when 
last payment is made. 

For printed matter and information about rates, routes, etc., address, 

MOSES FOLSOM, nVC^^^ B^SS, 

Immigration Agent, General Immigration Agent, 

404 Walnut St., Des Moines, Iowa. 220 South Clark St., Chicago, 111. 



"^^ 



'■•\, -' 



Year] 



FA.]M1LY _A^LM:^]Sr^C. 



[1899. 



ECLIPSES FOB THE YEAR 1899. 
In the year 1899 there will be five Eclipses — three of the Sun and two of the Moon. 

The First is a Partial Eclipse op the Sun, January 11th, at 5 o'clock 11 min. in the 
evening-. Invisible here. Visible to Alaska, Eastern Asia and the Pacific Ocean. 

The Second is a Partial Eclipse op the Sun, June 8th, at 12 o'clock 43 min. in the 
morning-, therefore invisible here. Visible in Alaska, Iceland, Greenland Western Europe and 
the No th Atlantic Ocean. 

The Third is a Total Eclipse op the Moon, June 23rd, at 8 o'clock 41 min. in the morn 
ing. Invisible here. Visible to Western portion of North America, in Asia, Africa and the Pa 
cific Ocean. 

The Fourth is an Annular Eclipse op the Sun, December 2d, at 7 o'clock 10 min. in 
the evening. Invisible here. Visible to Southern Australia, New Zealand and the South Pacific 
Ocean. 

The Fifth is a Partial Eclipse op the Moon, December 16th. Visible in North 
America, Europe, Asia, Africa and South America. 



EASTERN STATES. 
Moon enters Penumbra at 5 o'clock 43 min. 
Moon enters Shadow "6 " 55 " 
Middle of the Eclipse " 8 " 36 " 
Moon leaves Shadow " 10 " 17 " 
Moon leaves Penumbra " 11 " 29 " 



CENTRAL STATES. 

5 o'clock 03 min. 

6 " 15 " 

7 " 56 " 

9 " 87 " 

10 •' 49 " 



WESTERN STATES. 

4 o'clock 23 min. 

5 " 85 " 

7 " 16 " 

8 " 57 " 
10 " 09 " 



MANITOBA. 

3 o'clock 08 mia. Even 

4 •* 20 " Even 
6 " 01 " Even 

8 " 42 " Even 

9 " 54 " Even 



t^^ Aries, tlie Ram. 
(^ Taurus, the Bull. 
^ Gemini, tlie Twins 
ykk Cancer, the Crab. 



^ Sagittarius, the Bowm 
^ Capricornus, the Goat. 

^ Aquarius, the Batler. 
i!S; Pisces, the Fishes. 



Venus ($) is Called the Governing Planet this Year. 
CHARACTERS OF THE CO:^rSTELLATIONS. 

(gf Leo, the Lion. 
^ Virgo, the Virgin. 
^ Libra, the Balance. 
ci^ Scorpio, the Scorpiou. 

ASTRONOMICAL CHARACTERS EXPLAINED. 

IflNew Moon 

^^ First Quarter, or Moon in general. 
Ib^lFull Moon. 



'Last Quarter, or Moon in general. 



T? Saturn, 
% Jupiter, 

$ Mars, 
Sun, 
]) Moon, 



$ Venus, 
^ Mercury, 
Earth, 
V^ Herschel. 

l|j Neptune. 



Q Moon's ascending Node, or Dragon's 

Head. 
S Moon's descending Node, or Dragon's 

Tail. 
^ Moon's Ascension. 
^ Moon's Descension. 

2) Moon in apogee, farthest from earth. 

3) Moon in perigee, nearest to the earth 

PLANETS AND ASPECTS. 

d Conjunction, or planets in the same longitude. 
>|< Sextile, when they are 60 degrees apart. 
n Quartile, when they are 90 degrees distant. 
A Trine, when they are 120 degrees distant. 
(5^0pposHion, when they are 180 degrees distant 



CHRONOLOGICAL CYCLES. 



Dominical Letter 
Epact 



A 

18 



Lunar Cycle or Golflen NmDer 19 

Solar Cycle 4 



Roman Indiction 12 

Julian Period 6612 



Ember Days: February 2 2d, May 24th, September 20th, December 20th. 

In the Jewish Era the year 5660 commences at Sunset, September 4th, 1899. 

In the Mo'^ammedan Era the year 1317 beg-ins on the 12th day of May, 1899. 



Yearj 



FA_]M1LY -z^LjVl^VISrA^C, 



[1899^ 



GENTE>NNIf\L flL/V\f\NflC FOR 1899. 

VENUS IS CALLED THE RULING PLANET THIS YEA^^. 



The Year in General.— Will be rather 
dry, t iking' the whole year tog"ether; it will also 
be sultry, and tolerably warm. 

Spring. — If the solar year continues warm 
and pleasant till late there will be a late 
spring, generally temperate, and is favorable 
to all kinds of grain. When winter grain is 
forward and large, the sheep may be pastured 
on it without injury; they may also be kept on 
the meadows long-er than other years. 

Summer. — If the spring rains do not continue 
too long, there will be a warm, sultry summer, 
as it generally is; if, however, there is much 
rain in the spring, there will b ^ a dry, hot sum- 
mer, which, however, is not often the case. In 



erally by the end o. November winter will set 
in. 

Winter.— 1 1 the commencement is tolerably 
dry; afterwards, especially from about the 12th 
of February to the beginning of spring, quite 
wet, very heavy showers, which often prove in- 
jurious to persons, buildings and cattle. 

Cultivation of Summer Grain. —When 
the spring is wet, and there are rains almost 
every day, the grain should be put out as early 
as possible, as there will be a dry, hot summer, 
without rain for several weeks. 

Cultivation of Winter Grain. — Be the 
year as it will, the corn and wheat will seldom 
produce much besides straw, unless the grain is 
pastured down in the spring. 

Autumn Seeding.— Winter grain should be 
sown in good time on account of the early win- 
ter which will follow. 

Fruit. — If it is very wet in the spring there 
will be very little of any kind of fruit. If it is 
about usually temperate, there will be plenty 
of apples, plums, nuts, cherries, pears and 
acorns. 



this case there will be good vintage; otherwise 
there is danger that ihuch hay and grain will 
spoil on the fields. 

Fall. — This season is generally warm and 
pleasant, but will not last long; hence the 
necessity o' attending early to the fall work. 
Winter grain •>hould be sown early, the grape 
vines covered, and winter fruit secured, as gen- 

MOVABLE FESTIVALS. 

Septuagesima Sunday, January 29th. 
Sexagesima Sunday. February 5th. 
Quinquagesima Sunday, February 12th. 
Shrove Tuesday, February 14th. 
Ash Wednesday, February 15th. 
Palm Sunday, March 26th. 
Good Friday, March 31st. 

THE FOUR SEASONS OR CARDINAL POINTS. 
eastern states. central states, western states. Manitoba. 

Spring begins March 20tli, at 3 o'clock 10 min. 2 o'clock 30 min., 1 o'clock 50 min., 1 o'clock 35 min., P. M. 

Summer begins June 21st, "11 " 08 " 10 " 28 " 9 " 48 " 9 "33 " A. M. 

Autumn begins Sept. 23d, " 1 " 42 " 1 " 02 " 12 " 22 " 12 " 07 " A. M. 

Winter begins Dec. 21st, " 8 " 10 " 7 " 30 " 6 " 50 " 6 " 35 " P. M. 



flnatomu of Man's Bodu, as said to be governed bu the Twelve Constellations. 



Easter Sunday, April 2d. 

Ascension Day, May 11th. 

Whitsuntide, May 21st. 

Trinity Sunday, May 28th. 

Sundays after Trinity are 26 

First Sunday in Advent, December 3d. 



Tlie Head and Face. 
^ Aeies. 

Arms. 
/^ Gemini. 

Heart 
<gf Leo. 

Reins. 
^ Libra. 

Thighs. 
jg$ Sagittarius. 

Legs. 
^ Aquarius. 




NecJc. 
(^ Taurus. 

Breast. 
>ui^ Cancer. 

Bowels, 

^ ¥lRGO. 

Secrets. 
c|g Scorpio. 

Knees. 
^ Capricorn. 

The Feet. 
S: Pisces. 



I^^^Thc calculations in this Almanac are made to Solar or Apparent Time. 
Table when the Sun is "slow" and subtract it when "fast," for mean or clock time. 
Dale Enterprise, Rockingham Co., Virginia. 



To this add the euuation in mo Hour 
L. J. Hkatwolk. 



Brethren s Family AlTnanac, 



'V 



A HISTORY OF THE BRETHREN'S MISSIONS. 



Early Efforts. 

Possibly one of the most effectual ways of doing 
missionary work is to have members move into new 
localities and establish both their residence and the 
cause of Christ. Let the motive be fleeing from the 
hand of persecution, or even a desire to place one's 
self in better circumstances, as far as results are con- 
cerned such persons are doing missionary work. 
From this point of view the Brethren church has 
always been a missionary church. 

Step to Organization. 

As far as record is concerned, however, at a much 
earlier date than is usually thought, efforts have been 
made to make missions a special feature of church 
work. As early as 1852 the General Conference ad- 
vised that "it is the duty of the church, the ministers, 
and every private member, to do all that is in their 
power to fulfill that commission (Matt. 28: 19, 20) in 
accordance with apostolic practice." In 1856 Vir- 
ginia sent a request that some plan be adopted so 
that the action of 1853 should "not remain a dead 
letter." Agitation favoring organized effort was kept 
up until in i860, when a committee consisting of the 
following worthy brethren, Daniel P. Saylor, John 
Kline, John H. Umstad, Samuel Layman, John Metz- 
ger and James Quinter, reported a plan for the 
church. The preamble is an excellent compilation 
of Scriptures setting forth the reasons for missionary 
work; it provides the raising of money according to 
I Cor. 16: 2, urges the churches to organize them- 
selves into State Districts of convenient size, supply 
evangelists where calls are made, and recommends 
that the ministry labor as heretofore, "without money 
and without price, as far as their circumstances will 
permit them to do." This plan was not adopted that 
year because of a small representation of the 
churches, but it set the churches to thinking more ear- 
nestly than before in favor of organized effort. The 
Civil War, which followed, so absorbed the mind of 
the Brethren that there was nothing done in missions 
until it was over, and then there was hardly an An- 
nual Meeting held which did not give some attention 
to the disposing of this question as seemed best at 
the time. In 1867 "the Annual Meeting hails the 
desire to have the Gospel spread as a favorable indi- 
cation," and other expressions from time to time 
show that the Conference had been strong in its 
sentiments in favor of missions, though the way did 
not open for organized effort until later. In 1868 the 
Conference adopted the plan recommended in i860, 
and re-affirmed it the following year, so as to give it 
all the force possible. 



Ten years now intervened to give the plan a test, 
and it seems the churches did not fall into line very 
readily, for in 1880 another plan, prepared by breth- 
ren J. W. Stein, John Metzger, Hiel Hamilton, J. D. 
Livengood and J. W. Fitzgerald, was adopted. The 
next year it was recommended to all the churches to 
hold collections for missionary purposes and send it 
with the delegates to the clerk of the Annual Meet- 
ing, and he report in the Minutes of the Annual 
Meeting. 

Denmark and Sweden Missions. 

Bro. Hope, after seeking in Europe and finally in 
America a people who served God as he understood 
the Bible, came across the Brethren and joined in 
with them. Soon his heart yearned for his fellow 
countrymen and in 1875 he was sent to Denmark. 
Elders Enoch Eby and Daniel Fry followed him in 

1876 to open up a mission, and Bro. Hope continued 
the work faithfully for a number of years. This was 
begun and carried on directly by the Northern Dis- 
trict of Illinois. However, the Annual Meeting in 

1877 encouraged it by permitting a general collection 
to be taken at the meeting for it. In 1884 there was 
a call for preaching in Sweden, and as there was a 
new committee put to work the call was referred to 
them and they at on :e opened a mission in Malmo. 
These missions have grown under some very dis- 
couraging circumstances. Among the people in 
Europe there is a strong desire to come to free Amer- 
ica, and in this way the mission churches have lost 
many members. Then some of our brethren have 
suffered imprisonment because they would not learn 
the art of war. But in the face of all this the Den- 
mark churches have about 100 members and the 
churches in Sweden about 125. When these mis 
sions were first started they were supported by funds 
especially donated for them, but it was not long until 
the Committee had to place these two fields under 
the general fund, in order to have means for carrying 
forward their work. The average expense of these 
missions for the past five years is about $650 for each 
country. 

The General Church Erection and Missionary 
Committee. 

Former plans not proving satisfactory, in 1884 the 
Annual Meeting adopted another plan for missionary 
work, and this has become the framework of all mis- 
sionary endeavor in the Fraternity. Brethren Daniel 
Vaniman, W. R. Deeter, S. S. Mohler, Enoch Eby 
and John Zuck drafted the plan which, among other 
things, recommended that five-brethren be appointed 
to serve a term of years and be reappointed by the 
Conference. The first Committee appointed were 
the following brethren: Daniel Vaniman, D. L. Miller, 
Enoch Eby, Samuel Riddlesberger and C. P. Roland. 



1st Month.] 



Jf^NUf^RY. 



[Days 31. 



Days & Weeks^l 



Remarkable 
Days. 



MOON 
Souths- 

H. M. 



MOON 

Rises & Sets 



Moon's 
Sis^ns. 
S. D. 



ftspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellanij. 



Sun I sxjisr 
Slow Rises & Sets. 
M.|h. M. I H. M. 



1] New Year Sunday. 



Luke 2. 



Day's length 9 hours 14 min. 



1 Sunday 

2 Mond'y 

3 Tues. 

4 Wed. 

5 Thurs. 

6 Friday 

7 Sat. 



20 
21 

22 
23 
24 

25 
26 



New Year 

Abel Seth 

Enoch 

Methuselah 

Simon 

JEpiphany 

Isidor 



5 


4 25 


9 40 


^10 


6 


5 8 


10 24 


^24 


7 


5 52 


11 15 


)^/% y 


7 


6 40 


morn. 


^5% -^3 


8 


7 32 


12 25 


« 7 


9 


8 29 


1 40 


«21 


10 


9 31 


2 51 


m 5 



c^ rises 8 55 ^ 

Orion so. 10 57 S 
If rises 12 1 
Sf^Sirius so. 11 40 
$ Great. Brill. 

$ in Perihelion 



47 23 


47 23 


5 


7 23 


5 


7 22 


6 


7 22 


6 


7 21 


7 


7 20 



37 
37 
37 

38 
38 
39 
40 



2] 1st Sunday after Epiphany. 


Luke 2. 


Day's length 9 hours 20 


min. 


8 Sunday 


27 


Erhard 


11 


10 35 


4 2 


^19 


d lit d. d ? ([ 


7 


7 20 


4 40 


9 Mond'y 


28 


Julian 


12 


11 19 


5 8 


m 2 


dbC ^ 


7 


7 19 


4 41 


10 Tues. 


29 


PauVs Imp. 


1 


11 47 


6 6 


^25 


d?([ 


8 


7 19 


4 41 


11 Wed. 


30 


Eugene 


1 


12 2 


([ sets 


^ 8 


/^P^0 eel. inv. ([mQ 


8 


7 18 


4 42 


12 Thurs. 


31 


Menno Simon's 
Renunciation 1.S36 


2 


12 41 


5 30 


^21 


iSil'^Kigel so. 9 30 


8 


7 18 


4 42 


13 Friday 


J 


Menno Simon 
died 1561 


3 


1 39 


6 34 


SS 4 


7* souths 8 2 


9 


7 17 


4 43 


14 Sat. 


2 


Felix 


3 


2 33 


7 48 


3*16|Aldebaran so. 8 41 


9 


7 17 


4 43 



3] 2d Sunday after Epiphany. John 2. 



Day's length 9 hours 28 min. 



15 Sunday 


3 


16 Mond'y 


4 


17 Tues. 


5 


18 Wed. 


6 


19 Thurs. 


7 


20 Friday 


8 


21 Sat. 


9 



Maurice 

Marcellus 

Anthony 

Franklin h. 

Sarah 

F. Sebastian 

Agnes 



4 


3 24 


8 57 


S^28 


5 


4 13 


10 1 


fP«ll 


6 


5 1 


11 35 


««ft23 


7 


5 49 


morn. 


^ 4 


7 


6 38 


12 36 


^16 


8 


7 28 


1 34 


^29 


9 


8 18 


2 32 


«»12 



Arcturus r. 11 8 Q 
Spica rises 12 10 
S rises 4 40 

;„(?(?©(? so. 12 15 
PCapellaso. 9 
Cast. so. 10 14 ©e.^ 
Pollux so, 10 2 



10 


7 16 


10 


7 15 


10 


7 14 


11 


7 13 


11 


7 12 


11 


7 12 


12 


7 11 



44 
45 
46 

47 
48 
48 
49 



4] 3d Sunday after Epiphany. Matt. 8. 



Day's length 9 hours 40 min'i 



22 Sunday 


10 


23 Mond'y 


11 


24 Tues. 


12 


25 Wed. 


13 


26 Thurs. 


14 


27 Friday 


15 


28 Sat. 


16 



Vincent 

Emerenth 

Timothy 

PauVs Conv 

Polycarpus 

F. Chrysost. 

Charles 



10 


9 9 


3 33 


7?*24 


11 


9 59 


4 30 


m 3 


11 


10 47 


5 23 


«12 


12 


11 34 


6 9 


«27 


1 


morn. 


([rises 


^ 6 


2 


12 18 


6 28 


^^21 


2 


1 2 


7 41 


^ 6 



d W C § in S ^ 
7* so. 7 10 
Orion so. 9 24 ([in^ 
d$T?.dc^([.([inApogee 
€~^S rises 6 10 
^/Sirius so. 10 4 
Arcturus rises 10 10 



12 


7 10 


12 


7 9 


13 


7 8 


13 


7 7 


13 


7 6 


13 


7 5 


13 


7 4 



50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 



5] Septuagesima Sunday. 



Matt. 20. 



Day's length 9 hours 54 min. 



29 Sunday 

30 Mond'y 

31 Tues. 



Valerius 

Adelgunda 

Virgil 



3 


1 43 


8 52^21 


3 


2 25 


10 6^ 5 


4 


3 7 


11 24^19 



nl(0.?G.H.L.N. 
Capella so. 8 16 
Orion so. 8 50 



S 



2 4 
l'4 



57 

58 
59 



IVIOOIM'S F>MASI 



EASTEKN STATES. 

Last Quarter, 4th, 10 o'clock 23 min. Even. 
New Moon, 11th, 5 " 51 " Even. 
First Quarter, 18th, 11 " 38 " Morn. 
Full Moon, 26th, 2 " 36 " Even. 



CENTRAL STATES 
9 o'clock 43 min. Even. 
5 " 11 
10 " 58 
1 " 56 



Even. 
Morn. 
Even. 



WESTERN STATES. 

9 o'clock 03 min. Even 

4 " 31 " Even 

10 " 18 " Morn 

1 " 16 " Even 



Mars is in opposition with the Sun on the 18th and shines all night. 



Brethren s Family Almanac, 



7 h 



Bro^ D. L. Miller was appointed Secretary and 
Treasurer, and has held the Treasurer's^ office con- 
tinuously since the first organization. The Commit- 
tee had the beginning of a great work before them. 
The churches were not properly organized for mis- 
sion work; many of them were even opposed, if not 
in an open way, silently; some housekeepers were 
outspoken against the move. Funds had to be 
raised; calls for preaching had to be filled; the breth- 
ren had to be educated to give and pray for such a 
grand work. The receipts for the first year were 
all that could have been expected, reaching as 
they did, $3,806.37. At this time the Denmark 
mission was a '^part of the Committee's work. The 
first year 48 congregations and 166 individuals con- 
tributed to that fund. To the general fund no con- 
gregations and 80 individuals gave what money the 
Committee had to use. 'This gives some idea of the 
sentiment back of the work. But it was bound to 
grow as succeeding years have shown. 

The Brethren's Book and Tract Work. 

The year following the adopting of the missionary 
plan, the Annual Meeting adopted a plan for the 
publication and distribution of tracts and books. 
The first brethren to serve on this committee were, 
S. W. Hoover, S. D. Royer, Adam Minnick, B. F. 
Miller, Jacob Hepner and Samuel Bock. They had 
a new work before them. True, brethren had been 
writing on the various doctrines of the church 
through the church papers, but few were the articles 
that showed the ability suitable for tract writing. 
The church has always held that the New Testament 
was her creed, and yet, when it came to writing and 
publishing tracts, the peculiar shades of meaning 
and understanding of these doctrines were being 
crystallized into such language as should be the true 
exposition of the faith, as believed by the church gen- 
eral. It was soon found necessary to have an exam- 
ining committee, and their work has been very la- 
borious and full of responsibility. But a good list of 
tracts was soon brought forth, and every year such 
were added as seemed best, until tracts on nearly 
every doctrinal subject are now ready for distribu- 
tion. 

The General Missionary and Tract 
Committee. 

The General Church Erection and Missionary 
Committee was appointed in 1884 to preach the Gos- 
pel and assist in building meetinghouses. The Book 
and Tract Work in 1885 was organized to publish 
and distribute tracts. Tracts went everywhere, be- 
cause the individual could often send a tract where 
the minister could not go. This brought forth urgent 
calls for preaching. Then, when ministers of the 
Missionary Committee went out they found the tracts 



a very valuable auxiliary in their work; and thus the 
two committees worked into each other's hands until, 
in 1895, by action of the Annual Meeting they were 
united under the name of the General Missionary 
and Tract Committee. This Committee, by legal act, 
became the lawful possessor of all papers, properties 
and privileges of both the old committees. Five 
members were still to constitute this new committee, 
but instead of selecting the members residing close 
together, as was the policy for both eld committees, 
the Conference thought it wisdom to select from dif- 
ferent parts of the Brotherhood, so as to have, as 
much as possible, every portion of the Fraternity 
represented on this important committee. The first 
committeemen were, Enoch Eby, of Kansas, D. L. 
Miller, of Illinois, S. W. Hoover, of Ohio, S. R. Zug, 
of Pennsylvania, and S. F. Sanger, of Virginia. 
Since this consolidation the Mission and Tract Work 
has been pushed most vigorously. 

The Rapid Growth. 

From the time the present plan of doing mission- 
ary work was adopted, it has been the steady and 
continuous aim of the Missionary Committee to 
have mission boards appointed in all the State Dis- 
tricts, so that the point needing missionary help 
within that territory could be reached by such local 
committee, which could be in closer touch with the 
nature of its needs than the General Board could. 
The General Board confined its efforts, with a few 
exceptions, to points not in the organized State Dis- 
tricts. Three State Districts, Texas, Oklahoma, and 
Oregon, Idaho and Washington, have been organized 
with a good body of churches, all the outgrowth of 
missionary effort in that territory. 

But possibly there can be no more interesting way 
of showing the growth of the missionary sentiment 
than by giving, as near as can be, the total receipts 
for each year since the work has begun: 

1884-5, $ 3.806 37 

1885-6, 3,074 84 

1886-7. 3.87729 

1887-8, 4,184 41 

1888-9, 5.58728 

1889-0, 7,936 32 

1890-1, 7,627 69 

1891-2, 11,074 04 

1892-3, 8,32805 

1893-4. 11.235 03 

1894-5 16,691 86 

1895-6, 19,629 18 

1896-7, 20,521 24 

1897-8, 30,984 40 

Total, $154,558 00 

Dr. Peter's Blood Vitalizer, by its mild yet active properties, 
is pre-eminently the children's remedy. Its effect is quickly no- 
ticeable by the clear skin, improved appetite and refreshed ap- 
pearance. It eliminates the impurities from the system and ere? 
ates new, rich, red blood. 



"% 



2d Month.] 



FEBRUARY, 



[Days 28, 



Days & Weeks 



Remarkable 
Days. 



$1 


MOON 
Soutbo. 


H 


H. M. 


4 


3 50 


5 


4 35 


6 


5 24 


7 


6 17 



MOON 

Rises & Sets 
H. M. 


Moon's 
Signs. 
S. D. 



ftsDects of Planets, ana 
Other Miscellany. 



Slow Rises & Sets. 
M. H. M. I H. M. 



1 Wed. 

2 Thurs. 

3 Friday 

4 Sat. 



20 
21 



Ignatius 



Candlemas 
22|Blasius 
23; Veronica 



11 20k#g 3 
morn Jc^ 17 

12 32|^ l' 
1 43^15 



71 rises 11 30 '^ 
Orion souths 8 48 

}^ rises 2 50 



595 1 

58 5 2 

57|5 3 

56 5 4 



6] Sexagesima Sunday. 






Luke 8. 


Day's length 10 hours 10 


rnin. 


5 Sunday 


24 


Agatha 


8 


7 14 


2 50:#)28 


d lit ([. (? so. 10 '66 |J4 6 55|5 5 


6 Mond'y 


25 


Dorothea 


9 


8 15 


3 48'^ 11 


d T? d. d ? ([ ^il46 54,5 6 


7 Tues. 


26 


Richard 


10 


9 18 


4 4llj^24 


$ rises 2 57 ([inS14 6 53 


5 7 


8 Wed. 


27 


Solomon 


11 


10 20 


5 23|,^ 7 

6 0,^19 


Rigel so. 7 40 


15 6 52 


5 8 


9 Thurs. 


28 


Apollonia 


12 


11 19 


d 5 ([. ([ in Perigee 


156 51 


5 9 


10 Friday 


29 


Scholastica 


1 


12 16 


([ sets'S; 2 


0Uk2 Gr. Elong. W 


15,6 50 


5 10 


11 Sat. 


30 


Euphrosina 


2 


1 9 


6 311^14 


'@!'7* sets 1 30 S'15!6 48 


5 12 



7] QUINQUAGESIMA SuNDAY. 



Luke 18. 



Day's length 10 hours 26 min. 



12 Sunday 

13 Mond'y 

14 Tues. 

15 Wed. 

16 Thurs. 

17 Friday 

18 Sat. 



31 
F 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 



Gilbert 
F. Castor 

Valenti'ne 
Shrove Tuexday 

Ash Wechi. 
Julian us 
Constantia 
Concordia 



3 


2 1 


4 


2 51 


4 


3 40 


5 


4 31 


6 


5 22 


7 


6 13 


8 


7 4 



7 30|S26 

8 23|^ 8 

9 22'j^20 

10 20^ 2 

11 21|^14 
morn. 1^26 

12 20 «, 8 



IRigel souths 7 25 
Antares r'ses 3 13 
Orion souths 7 56 
Andromeda s. 9 55 
Orion souths 7 46 

Jl^Procy. so. 8 56 
_f a^pellaso. 7 0. 



156 
156 
146 
146 



14 6 



4715 
465 
44'5 
43|5 
425 
41 '5 



13 
14 
16 
17 
is 
19 
^^1 



8] 1st Sunday in Lent. 



Ma:t. 4. 



Day's length 10 hours 42 min. 



19 Sunday 

20 Mond'y 

21 Tues. 

22 Wed. 

23 Thurs. 

24 Friday 

25 Sat. 



7 Susanna 

8 Eucharius 

9 Eleonora 

10 E)nherday 

11 Se enus 

l"^ St. Matthew 
13 Victorinus 



9 


7 


54 


9 


8 


43 


10 


9 


31 


11 


10 


16 


11 


10 


50 


12 


11 


42 


12 


morn. 



1 

2 
3 
3 
4 

5 

Crisesi^U 



19^20 

15« 3 
10«16 
58W 
40|(^14 
SO.'cgf 29 



d w ^^ o ^1^^- « 

Pol. S0.9 40.([in23 ^ 
([ in Apogee 
Spica rises 9 26 
Regulus rises 11 22 
1/ stationary 
Antares r. 2 21 



I'i 


5 55 


14 


6 37 


14 


6 36 


14 


6 34 


14 


6 "33 


14 


6 32 


13 


6 31 



22 
23 
24 
26 
27 
28 
«>9 



9] 2d Sunday in Lent. 



Matt. 15. 



. Day's length 11 hours 02 ruin. 



26 Sunday 

27 Mond'y 

28 Tues. 



fleremiah 

Leander 

Romanus 



12 24 
1 6 
1 49 



15 
30 
40 



^29 

^14 
)^% -9 



UV^Q. S so. 8 52 ^ 
c^ stationary, d ? © 
Sirius souths 7 43 



13 


6 29 


13 


6 28 


13 


6 27 



5 31 
5 32 
5 33 



IVIOOIM'S RMASEIS. 



EASTERN STATES. 
Last Quarter, 3d, 12 o'clock 26 min. Even. 
New Moon, 10th, 4 " 33 " Morn. 
First Quarter, ITth, 3 " 54 " Morn. 
fullMQon, ;i&th, 9 " 18 " Morn. 



CENTRAL STATES. 
11 o'clock 46 min. Morn. 
3 " 53 " Morn. 
3 " 14 " Morn. 
8 " 38 " Morn. 



WESTERN STATES. 
11 o'clock 6 min. Morn 
3 " 13 " Morn 
2 " 34 " Morn 
7 " 58 " Morn 



Brethren's Family Almanae. 



V\ - 



This $154,558 was applied to the several places 
where it was intended at an expense of $3,449.30 for 
postage and stationery, committee's traveling ex- 
penses and secretary's salary; in o her words it took 
not quite 2% cents of every dollar to distribute the 
dollar donated. During these fourteen years the 
Committee has rendered assistance in building 121 
meetinghouses, assisted nearly every State District 
in the Brotherhood, and many of them every year, 
and have received into church fellowship at mission 
points, not under the care of a District, 1,070 mem- 
bers. 

Missions Abroad. 

Stirred with a desire to preach the Gospel to the 
heathen in India, Bro. W. B. Stover, in the early part 
of 1893, began advocating the opening of a mission in 
that country. He traveled among the churches, prin- 
cipally in the eastern part of the United States, and 
awakened a good interest in the move. The Com- 
mittee decided to recommend the opening of a mis- 
sion in India. Bro. Stover and his wife, Mary Em- 
mert Stover, and Sister Bertha Ryan were the first 
ones to be sent to begin the work in that far away 
land. Under great difficulties they acquired the 
Gujerati language, and have received into fellowship 
24 members, making a total of 31 in India. Besides, 
the recent famine in that land called forth liberal con- 
tributions for an Orphanage, which has been started 
with upwards of forty inmates. The cost of keeping 
an orphan and educating him in India is about $25 
per year. Within the last year Eld. S. N. McCann 
and Sister Lizzie Gibbel, who has since become Bro. 
McCann's wife, and Eld. D. L. Forney and wife, 
Annie Forney, have reinforced the workers in India. 
The work is in a prosperous condition. 

Following a visit among the Seven Churches of 
Asia by brethren D. L. Miller and Joseph Lahman in 
1892-3, the former was impressed with the importance 
of opening a mission in Asia Minor. Soon after Eld. 
G. J. Fercken was received into the church of the 
Brethren, and being a native of Asia Minor, the way 
at once opened to begin a mission at Smyrna. Con- 
tributions for this fund have been very liberal. 
Bro. Fercken, with his co-laborers, has gathered 
thirty-seven members into the fold and established 
churches both in Smyrna and Aidin, and opened a 
mission in Philadelphia. An Orphanage for Armeni- 
an children, whose parents were slaughtered in the 
recent massacres in that country, has been estab- 
lished and conducted successfully. An orphan is 
clothed and educated at an expense of $30 per year. 
The membership in the churches of Asia Minor is 
thirty-nine. 

The Endowment. 

Soon after the adoption of the present missionary 
plan the Committee began raising an endowment by 



having brethren, who were favorably disposed, to 
give their obligation to pay a certain sum of money 
at a certain time, and paying interest on the prin- 
cipal until the note was paid. 'The brethren re- 
sponded promptly and liberally to this, and soon a 
permanent fund was raised, the interest from which 
is to-day assisting greatly in the preaching of the 
Gospel. By this plan the principal is invested, but 
never spent, — only what the principal produces be- 
ing used for missionary work. The Book and Tract 
Work also started an endowment on a similar basis, 
adding the additional feature of allowing each one 
who gave a note and paid interest to draw annually 
in tracts and books, five-sixths of what he paid in 
interest. The combined endowments at the time of 
the consolidation of the two committees reached over 
$100,000. The uniting of the two committees gave a 
new impetus to the endowment work. Brethren and 
sisters, whom the Lord blessed with this world's 
goods, had a desire to leave some of it for the church, 
and the careful management of the funds intrusted 
to the hands of the Committee encouraged them to 
place their funds there. Among the estates received 
mention may be made of the Houser donation in Cal- 
ifornia which nets the Committee over $30,000; the 
Barbara Gish estate, reaching about $60,000, and the 
Ella Williams estate, nearly $6,000. Other liberal- 
hearted brethren made up a fund and presented to 
the church, in the form of an endowment, the entire 
publishing interests of the church, having a stock 
value at par of $50,000, but really being worth at 
least twice that amount. Thus the endowment has 
grown steadily, and practically all in the last ten 
years, to over $300,000. And to-day there is a greater 
interest and influx of funds to the endowment than at 
any period before. 

Wills. 

Considerable property has come to the Committee 
already, in the form of a will, but in a few cases there 
has been difficulty to get what was intended, because 
the name of the Committee was not properly entered 
in the will. For the benefit of others who may wish 
to remember the mission work in their wills the fol- 
lowing forms are given: 

FORM OF LEGACY,— WILLING MONEY. 

I also give and bequeath to the General Missionary and Tract 

Committee of the German Baptist Brethren church 

dollars, for the purposes of the Committee, as specified in their 
charter. And I hereby direct my executor (or executors) to pay 
said sum to the Secretary of said Committee, taking his receipt 
therefor, within . . . months after my decease. 



A HUNDRED YEARS.— A medicine cannot live a century un- 
less it possesses merit. The combination of herbs and roots that 
constitutes Dr. Peter's Blood Vitalizer was discovered over one 
hundred years ago by the old Dr. Peter Fahrney. It has been 
doing a grand work of blood purification and strength restoration 
ever since. 



3d Month.J 



MflRGH. 



[Days 31. 



Days & Weeks 



:3? 
5:0 



Remarkable 
Daijs. 



H 


MOON 
Souths. 
H. M. 


MOON 

Rises & Sets 
H. M. 


Moon's 
Signs. 
S. D. 



Aspects 0? Planets, and 
Other Mlscellanu. 



8uui sTJisr 
Slow Rises ik Sets. 
H. M. I H. M. 



i Wed. 

2 Thurs. 

3 Friday 

4 Sat. 



17 
18 
19 
20 



>S'/. J) a old 
Siinplicius 
Samuel 
i\ (Irian 



2 34 lu 47c^l4c? souths 8 49 

3 22|ll 50c^28d % ([ 

4 13 morn. '^12 |7^^t|J stationary 

5 7|12 40'^25\|Lc5 lite 



126 
126 



6 25 5 
6 24 

23 

21 



35 
5 36 
5 37 
5 39 



10] 3d Sunday in Lent. 






Luke 11. 


Day's length 11 hours 20 


min. 


Sunday 


21 Frederick 


7 


6 5 


1 35 


m 8 


d T? C. T? r. 1 40 ^ 


I2 6 20 


5 40 


6 Mond'y 


22.Fridolin 


8 


7 5 


2 20 


^21 


Pollux so. 8 31 ([inS 


11 


6 19 


5 41 


7 Tues. 


23 


Perpetua 


9 


8 5 


2 58 


^ 4 


Orion so. 6 36 


11 


6 18 


5 42 


8 Wed. 


24 


Philemon 


10 


9 3 


3 32 


^17 


d $ c 


11 


6 16 


5 44 


9 Thurs. 


25 


Prudence 


11 


10 


4 20 


^,29 


([ in Perigee 


n 


6 14 


5 46 


10 Friday 


26 


Apollonius 


12 


10 54 


4 56 


S^ll 


MjkAndro. s. 8 24 


10,6 13 


5 47 


11 Sat. 


27 


Ernestus 


12 


11 46 


([ sets 


S23 


'©I'Rigelso. 5 40 S 


106 12 


5 48 



11] 4th Sunday in Lent. 






John 6. 


Day's length 11 hours 38 


min. 


12 Sunday 


2 8, Gregory 


1 


12 37 


7 20 


^ 5 


D 1 70 d^d.^it station. 


10 


6 11 


5 49 


13 Mond'y 


M 


Macedon 


2 


1 28 


8 16 


^17 


□ bO 


9 


6 10 


5 50 


14 Tues. 


2 


Zachariah 


3 


2 19 


9 14 


op«28 


Spica rises 8 1 7 


9 


6 8 


5 52 


15 Wed. 


3 


Christopher 


4 


3 11 


10 14 


^10 


Vega rises 10 7 


9 


6 7 


5 53 


16 Tliurs. 


4 


Cyprianus 


5 


4 3 


11 14 


^22 


Sirius so. 6 5,5 


9 


6 6 


5 54 


17 Friday 


5 


St. Patrick 


6 


4 56 


morn. 


^ 4 


""^^^ in Perihelion 


8 


6 4 


5 56 


18 Sat. 


6'Anshelmus 


6 


5 47 


12 8 


^16 


^d ^ c 


8 


6 3 


5 57 



12] 5th Sunday in Lent. 






John 8. 


Day's length 11 hours 56 


min. 


19 Sunday 


7;Jo-e])hus 


7 


6 37 


12 54 


*»29 


7* sets 11 14 Cin^ ^ 


86 2 


5 58 


20 Mond'y 


8 


Matrona 


8 


7 26 


1 14 


«12 


(d^V.^-9^P%^^^^ir' 


86 


6 


21 Tues. 


9|Benedictus 


9 


8 12 


1 58 


«25 


([ in Apogee 


7 5 59 


6 1 


22 Wed. 


lOPaulina 


10 


8 56 


2 35 


^ 8 


Aldebaran sets 11 18 


7 5 58 


6 2 


23 Thurs. 


lllEberhard 


10 


9 39 


3 10 


<ft22 


Regulus so. 9 49 


7 5 57 


6 3 


24 Friday 


12'Gabriel 


11 


10 21 


3 54 


M 1 


? Gr. Elong. E. 


7 


5 55 


6 5 


25 Sat. 


X'^Ann. v. M. 


12 


11 3 


4 20 


^22 


Sirius so. 6 26 ^ 


6 


5 54 


6 6 



13] Palm Sunday. 



Matt. 21. 



Day's length 12 hours 16 min. 



26 Sunday 

27 Mond'y 

28 Tues. 

29 Wed. 

30 Thurs. 

31 Friday 



14 Emmanuel 

1 5 Gustavus 

16 Gideon 

17 Eustatius 
\% Maundy T. 
19 Good Frid. 



12 


11 46 4 54 


^^^ 7 


1 


morn, ([rises 


1^22 


1 


12 31 


8 2 


« 8 


2 


1 18 


9 18 


«23 


3 


2 9 


10 34 


m 7 


4 


3 3 


11 43 


«?a2i 



.? m ^ 

? Gr.Hel.Lat.N. 

7* sets 10 40 
d If ([. Ij: r. 9 20 
$ souths 7 17 

6^(L ^ 



53 
52 
51 
49 

48 
47 



7 

8 

9 

11 

12 

13 



IVIOOIM'S PHASES. 



EASTERN STATES. 
Last Quarter, 4th, 1 1 o'clock 08 min. Even. 
New Moon, 11th, 2 " 55 '' Even. 
First Quarter, 18th, 10 " 26 " Even. 
Full Moon, 27th, 1 " 20 " Morn. 



CENTRAL STATES. 
10 o'clock 28 min. Even. 

2 " 15 " Even. 

9 " 46 " Even. 
12 *' 40 " Morn. 



WESTERN STATES. 
9 o'clock 48 min. Even 
1 " 35 " Even 
9 ** 06 " Even 
12 " 00 " Morn 



Brethren s Family Almandc. 



"X 



FORM OF A DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE. 

I also give, bequeath, and devise to the General Missionary 
and Tract Committee of the German Baptist Brethren church 
one certain lot of land, with the buildings thereon standing (here 
describe the premises with exactness and particularity), to be 
held and possessed by the said Committee, their successors and 
assigns forever, for the purposes specified in their charter. 

The Relation of the General and District 
Mission Boards. 

The Brotherhood is divided, first, into congrega- 
tions, and second, into State Districts. In every one 
of these State Districts there is a territory where the 
Gospel has not been preached by the Brethren, and 
where there are calls for preaching. To look after 
this work especially, each State District has appoint- 
ed a District Mission Board and raised funds for its 
use. The District Board is, by the very nature of its 
appointment and instructions from the District, the 
only authorized body to do mission work in the State 
District; and this is proper, for they are best fitted 
for it from these standpoints. They are nearer the 
work than any other board and are better acquainted 
with it. They are interested more directly in build- 
ing up the cause in their own territory. But it is not 
unfrequent that the District is too weak financially to 
carry on its work. Then the District Board can call 
upon the General Board for such assistance as it 
needs, and as long as there are funds in the treasury 
of the General Board it will be rendered. But note 
that assistance is given the District Board, not the 
work taken off the District Board's hands. No mat- 
ter what the nature of the work, it is the intent of the 
present plan of the Brotherhood that the District 
Board looks after the work of its own territory. 

The purpose of the General Board is twofold, — to 
assist State Districts and reach out in the world 
where there are no State Districts. While there may 
appear several exceptions to the above relation exist- 
ing to-day, they remain the outgrowth of this relation 
not being fully understood or accepted in the past. 
As fast as the way opens, these few points are being 
returned to their proper places, and ,no more points 
within State Districts are assumed by the General 
Board. G. b. r. 

A WONDERFUL IMAGE. 



BY LANDON WEST. 

It is admitted by all readers of the Bible that its 
prophets and writers all lived and wrote in the East- 
ern hemisphere, yet there is, here in America, a 
mark and inscription, as it were, made by'the intelli- 
gent hand of others, who evidently wished to give 
witness to the first great and sad event said to have 
occurred in earth's first family, as set forth in Gen. 3. 

There is here, in Adams County, Ohio, the figure of a 
large serpent drawn on the earth's surface, and show- 



ing the thought of life, a high degre-e of intelligence 
for serpents (Gen. 3: i, 4, 5), the eating of fruit, the 
attempt at deception, and the thought of death, all as 
faithfully set forth at our feet as can be shown upon 
paper by the best artists of this day; in fact, none 
but experts at drawing can copy correctly the mam- 
moth picture lesson I name. 

The figure is more than one thousand feet in 
length, a large ridge thrown up on the earth's sur- 
face, and apparently with no other object in view 
than to make a record of the one sad event which, 
Moses says, occurred in the Garden of Eden, and in 
the early history of the human family. Gen. 3. It is 
evidently the most ancient effort at record the world 
has, for there is said to be no other figure on the 
earth like it, and this seems to locate and describe 
the first error committed by the human race, and to 
mark death as the result of it, which proof continues 
yet. 

The mark is located on a high cliff, on the east 
side of Ohio Brush Creek, just below the union of the 
three branches of that stream, with the head of the 
figure directly toward them and also toward the 
North Star. 

The mouth of the serpent is shown wide open, and 
as holding the figure of a large fruit, shaped as a 
lemon or plum, which is at least one hundred feet 
in length and nearly seventy-five feet in width, thus 
showing the attempt at deception, and the serpent 
the deceiver, as given in the Word, which agrees ex- 
actly with what we all know, for serpents do not eat 
fruit. 

The figure, for some hundreds of feet southward, 
shows the serpent to manifest strong efforts in life, as 
if in a struggle and dying, the ridge being crooked 
heavily, to show, as it were, a dying scene. 

At the lower extremity the figure is coiled three 
times around, as gracefully as is seen in nature, or 
can be shown by our best artists, thus representing 
death to perfection. In fact, none can set forth the 
one sad event that Moses says occurred in the Gar- 
den of Eden, better than is here shown in our own 
land, and that, too, in a silent object lesson on the 
earth's surface, formed here in the Ohio Valley, long 
before object lessons among men had been dreamed 
of. The mystery is: How should this life-like and in- 
telligent picture lesson, showing the one sad event of 
Eden, be drawn here in a heathen land, as found 
here in the wild forests of America? Job says it was 
formed by the Creator's hand (Job 26: 13), which is 
the most reasonable solution of the mystery that 1 
see. 



DR. PETER- FAHRNEY, of Chicago, does not advertise ex- 
tensively in the newspapers, preferring to have his medicine sell 
on its own merits, yet hardly an issue of our paper goes to press 
without its containing some favorable mention of this remedy. 



4th Month.] 



flPRIL. 



[Days 30. 



Days & Weeks ^| 


Remarkable 
Daus. 


P (TO 

H 


MOON 
Souths. 

H. M. 


MOON Moon's 
Rises & Sets Signs. 
H. M. S. D. 


flspects o! Planets, and 
Other Miscellanu. 


^"1 suasr 
Slow Rises & Sets. 
M. H. M. |H. M. 


1 Sat. 20 Theodore 5 4 1 morn. ^ 5 d b C ^ 4|5 45 6 15 



14] Easter Sunday. 



Mark 16. 



Day's length 12 hours 35 min. 



2 Sunday 


21 


3 Mond'y 


22 


4 Tues. 


23 


5 Wed. 


24 


6 Thurs. 


25 


7 Friday 


26 


8 Sat. 


27 



Easter Sun 

Easter Man. 

Ambrosius 

Maximus 

Zaccheus 

Egesippus 

Dyonisins 



6 


4 59 


12 42 


^18 


6 


5 58 


1 32 


^ 1 


7 


6 56 


2 12 


^»J4 


8 


7 51 


2 45 


.f^26 


9 


8 44 


3 14 


^ 8 


10 


9 35 


3 38 


^20 


11 


10 25 


4 16 


ff* 2 



^ sta. Pp sta. Cm^ 
S souths 7 6 
Sirius so. 7 37 

Aldebaran s. 10 26 

(J in Perigee 

$ rises 3 10 



4 


5 44 


4 


5 42 


3 


5 41 


3 


5 40 


3 


5 39 


2 


5 37 


2 


5 36 



6 16 
6 18 
6 19 
6 20 



21 
23 
24 



15] 1st Sunday after Easter. 



John 20. 



Day's length 12 hours 48 min. 



9 Sunday 

10 Mond'y 

11 Tues. 

12 Wed. 

13 Thurs. 

14 Friday 

15 Sat. 



28|Prochorus 
29paniel 
30'julius 
31|Eustachius 
A i Justinus 

2 

3 



Tiburtius 
Olympia 



12 


11 15 


4 40 


f^l4 


1 


12 6 


([ sets 


^25 


2 


12 58 


8 16 


^ 7 


2 


1 51 


9 16 


^19 


3 


2 44 


10 16 


'» 1 


4 


3 37 


11 9 


iW 


5 


4 29 


11 55 


«26! 



$ in Aphelion 

Vega r. 10 
d § O inferior 
Spica rises 8 16 

d tpc 



30 rs 



2 


5 35 


1 


5 33 


1 


5 32 





5 31 


O 


5 30 


Fast 


5 28 


1 


5 27 



25 

27 
28 
29 
30 
32 
33 



18] 2d Sunday after Easter. 



John 16. 



Day's length 13 hours 06 min. 



16 Sunday 


4 


17 Mond'y 


5 


18 Tues. 


6 


19 Wed. 


7 


20 Thurs. 


8 


21 Friday 


9 


22 Sat. 


10 



Calixtus 

Rudolph 

^neas 

Anicetus 

Sulpitius 

Adularius 

Cajus 



6 


5 18 


morn. 


^€■8 


7 


6 5 


12 40 


«21 


8 


6 50 


1 20 


^ 4 


8 


7 33 


1 57 


^^17 


9 


8 15 


2 25 


^ 1 


10 


8 57 


2 58 


^15 


10 


9 40 


3 21 


^ 



Aldebaran s. li 42 
1|7* sets 9 26 
Pdc^C. ([inApog. 
$ sets 1 30 Cin^ 
? in S. enters ^ 
Rigel sets 10 38 S 
Regulus so. 9 53 





5 25 




5 24 




5 23 




5 22 




5 21 




5 20 




5 19 



6 35 
6 36 
6 37 
6 38 
6 39 
6 40 
6 41 



17] 3d Sunday after Easter. 



John 16. 



Day's length 13 hours 22 min. 



23 Sunday 


11 


St. George 


11 


10 24 


3 40;^15 


u$(d 


2 5 18 


6 42 


24 Mond'y 


12 


Albert 


12 


11 11 


4 


« 1 


^ stationary 


2 


5 17 


() 43 


25 Tues. 


13 


Mar'kEvan. 


12 


morn. 


([rises 


«16 


f^8 1^ 0. d 1/ C 


2 


5 16 


6 44 


26 Wed. 


14 


Cletus 


1 


12 2 


8 14 


m 1 


^/l^ rises 8 20 


2 


5 15 


6 45 


27 Thurs. 


15 


Anastasius 


2 


12 56 


9 30 


m^^ 


6y^(L ^ 


3 


5 13 


6 47 


28 Friday 


16 


Vitalis 


2 


1 53 


10 35 


m 


Antares rises 9 34 


3 


5 11 


6 49 


29 Sat. 


17 


Sybilla 


3 


2 53 


11 30 


^14 


d T? ([ (ImQ 


3 


5 10 


6 50 



18] 4th Sunday after Easter. 



John 16. 



Day's length 13 hours 40 min. 



30 Sunday 1 18|Eutropius 4| 3 53|morn.|i^27|$inAphel. ginAphel. 3|5 9|6 51 



IVIOON'S PHASES. 



EASTERN STATES. 

Last Quarter, M, 6 o'clock 57 min. Morn. 
New Moon, 10th, 1 " 23 " Morn. 
First (Quarter, 17th, 5 " 45 " Even. 
Full Moon, I5th, 2 « 24 " Even. 



CENTRAL STATES. 
6 o'clock 17 min. Morn. 
12 " 43 " Morn. 
5 " 05 " Even. 
1 " 44 " Even. 



WESTERN STATES. 
5 o'clock 37 min. Morn 
12 " 03 " Mom 
4 " 25 " Even 
1 " 04 " Even 



Jupiter is in opposition with the Sun on the 25th and shines all night. 



Brethren's Family Almanac, 



13 



What is yet more remarkable, is the fact that the 
County in Ohio, holding the scene and lesson I have 
tried to describe, should be named for Adam, the 
only man ever allowed in the Garden of Eden, and 
the one, too, who was led to share in earth's first de- 
ception. Hence this figure and lesson may well be 
called, "That old Serpent," as expressed in Rev. 
12: 9, for it evidently shows a deception for the whole 
world to see, and it makes record, too, of the first 
error committed in the world's history. In fact, it is 
a complete picture and lesson, giving here in silence 
all the thought we can obtain from words, as to the 
event named and shown in Gen. 3, and set forth in a 
style so that all people, even heathens, might obtain 
its thought for ages, even while running over it. Its 
location, on the high ridge and cliff, compels all who 
pass on the east of the stream to pass over the figure, 
and they are thus made to see it. So I claim that 
these things, all here set forth, are no accident, for 
there are too many thoughts expressed and too much 
agreement with the written Word of God to be a 
mere "happen-so." They speak in language that 
may be seen, if not heard, and all in agreement with 
Moses, the only writer upon the subject, and giving 
the facts in a form that we are forced to believe, — both 
Moses' and Ohio's serpent-lesson agreeing exactly as 
to the thoughts given, and thus adding to the faith of 
all who are willing to accept the writings of Moses as 
a divine revelation. 

This one mammoth figure and mark, as to our 
world's history, found here in a heathen forest, goes 
back in its record even farther than the rainbow 
mark in the clouds, as to God's promise to Noah and 
all people (see Gen. 8: 20, 22; q: 8-17); for it shows 
the one and same relation of the Creator to the 
creatures, and these to their deceiver and enemy, as 
existed at the banishment, and this relation, to a vast 
extent, continues over all nations, even until to-day. 
Various theories as to the object of this figure and its 
makers have been suggested and calculated, but 
none that I have heard seem to unite in any way with 
what the Bible has said upon the thoughts this lesson 
so clearly shows. But their agreement with the Di- 
vine Volume is very remarkable indeed. 



REMINISCENCES OF JOHN H. UMSTAD. 



BY JAY G. FRANCIS. 

This is not the first time that accounts of Bro. 
Umstad's life have been written. A very interesting 
memoir by Bro. James Quinter is to be found in the 
"Brethren's Almanac" of 1875. A Mr. Auge, who 
has written short biographies of the most prominent 
men of Montgomery County, Pa., sees fit to include 
Bro. Umstad in his list. Mr. Auge's memoir is based 



yery largely upon Bro. Quinter's. We do not wish to 
give to the Brotherhood exactly what has already 
been given by an abler hand, so v/e shall devote our- 
selves to some reminiscences of our esteemed broth- 
er, as we have gathered them from those who knew 
him. In these you can see the man in action, and 
judge of him for yourselves. 

At the outset we wish to correct an error. Bro. 
Quinter states, as also does Mr. Auge, that John 
Horning Umstad was born Jan. i, 1802, in Montgom- 
ery County, Pa. The date is correct, but the place is 
not. Bro. Umstad was born in Philadelphia, and 
there remained until he was nine years old, when his 
father moved to the Umstad homestead in Mont- 
gomery County. 

In 183 1, when twenty-nine years of age, the P^ather 
from above sent his Holy Spirit to call John H. 
Umstad, that henceforth he might live unto God. 
The wooings of the Spirit were not resisted, and at 
the Coventry church he was buried in holy baptism, 
and arose to be known and loved as Bro. John 
Umstad. 

Let us look at Bra. Umstad's Christian home life. 
Unlike many professors to-day, he always observed 
family worship before breakfast. While still young 
in Christian experience, he found it necessary to 
build a new barn. The workmen boarded with him. 
So many strangers in the home made the cross of 
family worship very trying; and, besides, he thought 
it would consume too much time. In consequence, 
the first morning passed away without the family 
assembling around the morning altar. Bro. Umstad, 
however, was convicted of shirking duty and felt bad 
all day. The torment was too severe, and, like 
Jonah, he became willing to hearken to the voice of 
the Lord. Next morning he called the men together 
and thus addressed them: "We have been accus- 
tomed in the morning to assemble around the family 
altar, but I thought we would pass by our devotions 
while you workmen were here. I am convicted, how- 
ever, that I was wrong, so we will have our worship." 
The men gave him credit for his brave, faithful re- 
turn to duty; and, as a result, at least two of the 
workmen were converted. 

Few men were more liberal with their earthly pos- 
sessions than he. On one occasion a poor woman 
came to his home begging. He gave her five dol- 
lars, whereupon she went to the house. Sister Um- 
stad then came out to him and asked what she 
should give. Not saying anything about what he 
had done, he replied: "Mother, just give her what 
thee thinks is right. 'Let not thy left hand know 
what thy right hand doeth.' '' 

Dr. Peter's Blood Vitalizeipj'fs a remedy that '^uiljie tt{j„ the 
system, gives tone and vigo^o the'^nerves, regulates tlie circBll^- 
tion, will cure you. See ",^d," page 40. S 



K^. 



±A(JA.. 



<iV> 



-^I 



5th Month. 


] 








MfVY. 






[Days 31. 


Days & Weeks 


re 


Remarkable 




MOON 
Souths. 


MOON 

Rises & Sets 


Moon's 
Signs. 


flspects of Planets, and 


San 
Fast 


STunsr 
Rises & Sets. 




U^ 


Days. 


H 


H. M. 


H. M. 


S. D. 


Other IWIscellanu. 


M. 


H. M. 1 H. M. 


1 Mond'y 


19 


FMLd^Jas. 


5 


4 51 


12 52 


^10 


({; in Perigee *^ 


3 


5 7 


6 53 


2 Tues. 


20 


Sigismund 


6 


5 47 


1 23 


^23 


^^V souths 11 28 


3 


5 6 


6 54 


3 Wed. 


21 


Inv. of Cross 


7 


6 40 


1 48 


S 5 


\^ Vega so. 2 48 


3 


5 5 


6 55 


4 Thurs. 


22 


Florianus 


8 


7 30 


2 12 


ffil'^ 


Sirins sets 8 54 Q, 


3 


5 4 


6 56 


5 Friday 


23 


Godard 


9 


8 19 


2 35 


S^29 


7* sets 8 16 


3 


5 3 


6 57 


6 Sat. 


24 


John Evan, 


10 


9 8 


2 58 


^11$ rises 3 10 


4 


5 2 


6 58 



19] 5th Sunday after Easter. 


John 16. 


Day's length 13 hours 56 


min. 


7 Sunday 


25 


Domicilla 


11 


10 57 


3 26 


ff*23 


d ? C. d 5 C 


4 


5 1 


6 59 


8 Mond'y 


26 


Stanislaus 


12 


11 48 


3 52 


^ 5 


/^Regulus s. 1 28 


4 


5 


7 


9 Tues. 


27 


Job 


1 


12 13 


(^ sets 


^1^ 


'I^JirArctu. so. 11 12 


4 


4 59 


7 1 


10 Wed. 


28 


Gordianus 


2 


12 58 


8 14 


^29 


^ Great Elong W. 


4 


4 58 


7 2 


11 Thurs. 


29 


Ascension 


3 


1 26 


9 9 


**11 


Orion sets 8 59 


4 


4 57 


7 3 


12 Friday 


30 


Pancratius 


3 


2 19 


10 


*»23 


d W ([ Cin^ 


4 


4 56 


7 4 


13 Sat. 


M 


Servatius 


4 


3 10 


10 48 


m 5 


Spica so. 9 57 ^ 


4 


4 55 


7 5 



20] 6th Sunday after Easter. 



John 15. 



Day's length 14 hours 10 min. 



14 Sunday 

15 Mond'y 


2 
3 


16 Tues. 


4 


17 Wed. 


5 


18 Thurs. 


6 


19 Friday 


7 


20 Sat. 


8 



Christian 

Sophia 

Peregrina 

Venantius 

Liborius 

Potentia 

Torpetus 



5 


3 58 


11 28 


«18 


5 


4 44 


morn. 


*f 1 


6 


5 29 


12 32 


^14 


7 


6 10 


1 2 


^27 


8 


6 52 


1 28 


.^11 


8 


7 33 


1 54 


^25 


9 


8 19 


2 26 


^10 



Librae so. 11 38 
c^ sets 11 30 

d^C. CinApog. 

Sirius sets 8 4 
Procyon sets 10 30 
Antares rises 8 13 2S 
§ Great Heh Lat. S. 



4 


4 54 


4 


4 53 


4 


4 52 


4 


4 51 


4 


4 50 


4 


4 50 


4 


4 49 



6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

10 

11 



21] Whitsuntide. 






John 14. 


Day's length 14 hours 22 


min. 


21 Sunday 


9 


Whit Sun. 


10 


9 2 


2 53 


^25 


$ so. 5 21, ©ent.^ 


4 


4 48 


7 12 


22 Mond'y 


10 


Whit Man. 


11 


9 50 


3 7 


«io 


dl/([ 


3 


4 47 


7 13 


23 Tues. 


11 


Desiderius 


11 


10 43 


3 29 


«25 


% sets 10 40 


3 


4 46 


7 14 


24 Wed. 


12 


Emberday 


12 


11 40 


3 52 


s^io 


T? rises 9 20 


3 


4 46 


7 14 


25 Thurs. 


13 


Urbanus 


12 


morn. 


Crises 


l^24^dltf C 


3 


4 45 


7 15 


26 Friday 


14 


Beda 


1 


12 40 


9 16 


m 8. Wd b ([ ^ 


3 


4 44 


7 16 


27 Sat. 


15 


Lucina 


2 


1 42'10 36^22'5lt{([ CinS 


3 


4 43 


7 17 



22] Trinity Sunday. 



John 3; 



Day's length 14 hours 34 min. 



28 Sunday 


16 


William 


3 


2 43 


11 22 


^ 6 


C in Perigee 


3 


4 43 


7 17 


29 Mond'y 


17 


Sybilla 


4 


3 41 


11 54 


f^.l9 


Spica souths 8 57 


3 


4 42 


7 18 


30 Tues. 


18 


Wigand 


5 


4 38 


morn. 


S^ 1 


I^^Vega so. 2 4 


3 


4 42 


7 18 


31 Wed. 


19 


Manilius 


6 


5 28 


12 14 




\j|^l/so. 9 22 


3 


4 41 


7 19 



IVIOOISI 



EASTERN STATES. 



5 F>MAS£S. 

CENTRAL STATES. 



WESTERN STATES 



Last Quarter, 2d, 12 o'clock 48 min. Even. 
New Moon, 9th, 12 " 40 " Even. 
First Quarter, 17th, 12 " 15 " Even. 
Full Moon, 25th, 12 " 51 *' Morn. 
|:^ast Quarter, 3 1st, 5 " 56 " Even. 



12 o'clock 08 min. Even. 11 o'clock 28 min. Morn 

12 " 00 " Even. 11 " 20 " Morn 

11 " 35 " Morn. 10 " 55 " Morn 

12 " 11 " Morn. 24th 11 "31 " Even 
5 '• 16 '« Even. 4 " 36 " Even 



Brethren's Family Almanac, 



15 



He believed in carrying out to the letter the Sav- 
ior's command, that when one makes a feast, he 
should not invite his rich friends, but the poor who 
could not recompense a favor. So, on a certain 
Thanksgiving Day, instead of a family reunion, he 
invited the poor of the neighborhood to his festive 
board. In fact, so liberal did he become that friends 
deemed it necessary to interfere, to protect him from 
ruin. Unprincipled men would take advantage of 
his goodness of heart by borrowing money and never 
repaying it. A certain man once told him that he 
would never pay the money he owed until he was 
sued. "Very well," replied Bro. Umstad, "then you 
will never pay it." The man was afterward convert- 
ed and paid the money. 

Thus we have a few glimpses of our esteemed 
brother's charity. He seems to have been in danger 
of being carried away by his goodness of heart, but 
was he not like Jesus in this respect? 

Yet Bro. Umstad could be firm in matters of 
church government. A man in the neighborhood, 
who lived at enmity with his brother-in-law, became 
anxious about his spiritual condition and sent for 
Bro. Umstad. After talking awhile the man re- 
marked: "Yes, I am convinced of my duty." "But," 
came the query, "how about your brother-in law? 
Have you made that all right?" "No, indeed!" 
"Are you willing to settle it?" "No, sir!" "You 
may be convinced, but you are not converted." And 
the man, unwilling to be reconciled with his brother- 
in-law, had to seek church membership elsewhere. 

Bro. Umstad was a man of prayer. Often, when 
away from home, he would arise early in the morn- 
ing, and, like the Savior, withdraw from men, per- 
haps in the neighboring woods, and pray to his 
Father in secret. Eld. Emanuel Heyser, a. frequent 
traveling companion of Bro. Umstad, tells of such an 
occurrence. Bro. Heyser himself went to the woods 
to implore a Throne of Grace. On entering the 
woods he heard a noise, and looking around, finally 
beheld Bro. Umstad earnestly engaged in prayer. 
A tenant of his, his farmer, used to tell incidents that 
further display his great prayerfulness. Frequently, 
in the barn or elsewhere, he would find him praying. 
One night this man was awakened from his slumber 
by a noise outside the house. On going to the win- 
dow he perceived, at the foot of a large buttonwood 
tree, south of the house, Bro. Umstad engaged in 
fervent prayer. I have heard somewhere that on one 
occasion he spent two whole days in his haymow in 
prayer and fasting. (If any one reading this article 
knows of a surety that this statement is true, the 
writer would be obliged to receive word at Oaks, Pa., 
certifying it.) Other incidents showing his prayer- 
fulness might be given. 

A few words should be said of his labors in the 
Word. He spent little time in arranging the subject 



matter of his sermons. He was always ready at a 
moment's notice to preach the Gospel. An amusing 
incident is related of him in this connection. He was 
on a visit. Arrangements had been made for him to 
preach in the morning; but being a great fisherman, 
he had gone to the river in the morning to fish. He 
was intent and noted not the flight of time. Finally 
it came to his mind that he was to preach that morn- 
ing. He at once started for the church and found 
the people waiting for the preacher. Immediately, 
without a moment's delay, he walked up into the 
pulpit and began preaching from the text: "I go a 
fishing." John 21: 3. 

In social life he was equally ready to speak a word 
for his Master. His invariable question on meeting 
the young was: "Well, do you love Jesus?" Acer- 
tain unconverted man once said of him: "I hate to 
meet that man, for he always asks whether I love 
Jesus." Bro. Quinter says, " He was instant in season 
and out of season." 

On his tombstone, a few feet south of the church, 
in the Green Tree burial-ground, are the following 
words: 



-^ 



,-^ 



< 



BORN 
January i, 1802. 



®5' 



<^ 



DIED 
April 26, 1873. 

Aged 71 Years, 3 Months and 25 Days. 



"Rest from thy labors." 

If you should ask me to show you the monument of 
Bro. Umstad, I should not point to this piece of mar- 
ble, but to the institution of which he is the father,— 
the Green Tree Church. If you should ask me 
this question in heaven, I should point you to a 
crown filled with a multitude of glittering stars. 

Oaks, Pa. 

"DAT OLD PIPE." 



"I say, brudder, I thought you belonged to de 
church." 

"So I does." 

"Den why are you suckin' dat old pipe?" 

"Can't a feller smoke a pipe and belong to de 
church?" 

"Well, yes, he may belong to de church buildin', 
but never to the church triumphant." 

" I should like to know how you make dat out? " 

THE SECRET of the success of Dr. Peter's Blood Vitalizer 

lies in the fact that it eliminates the impurities from the blood, 
enriching the vital fluicj,— health necessarily follows. 



6th Month.] 



JUNE. 



[Day^, 30. 



Days & Weeks 



HO 



Remarkable 
Daijs. 



51 



MOON 
Souths. 

H. M. 



MOON 

Rises & Sets 
H. M. 



Moon's 
Signs. 
S D. 



Aspects ot Pian.eis, aiia 
Other Miscellanu 



Rises & Sets. 
II. M. 1 H. i\I. 



1 Thurs. 

2 Friday 

3 Sat. 



20 
21 

22 



Corpus Chr. 

Marcellus 

Erasmus 



9 



6 17 

7 6 
7 54 



12 48 2^25 17 souths 12 41 ^ ^ 
1 10^ 7 Spica souths 8 35 
1 47|j^ 19 Arcturus souths 9 26 



24 



40 
40 
39 



7 20 
7 20 
7 21 



23] 1st Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 16. 



Day's length 14 hours 42 min. 



4 Sunday^23 


Darius 


9 


8 43 


2 17 


^ 1 


Antares so; 11 32 


2 


4 39 


7 21 


5 Mond'y 


24 


Bonifacius 


10 


9 33 


2 58 


^12 


d $ ([ 


2 


4 38 


7 22 


6 Tues. 


25 


Artemius 


11 


10 25 


3 21 


^24 


$ rises 3 20 


2 


4 38 


7 22 


7 Wed. 


26 


Lucretia 


12 


11 18 


3 49 


m 6 


0§k6 § ([ 


1 


4 37 


7 23 


8 Thurs. 


27 


Medardus 


1 


12 11 


([rises 


^18 


^^^Q Eel. Invis. 


1 


4 37 


7 23 


9 Friday 


28 


Barnimus 


2 


1 2 


8 34 


« 1 


$ so. 4 45. ([in^ r^ 


1 


4 37 


7 23 


10 Sat. 


29 


Flavius 


3 


1 52 


9 20 


«14 


Procyon sets 8 38 


1 


4 36 


7 24 



24] 2d Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 14. 



Day's length 14 hours 48 min. 



11 Sunday 30 Barnabas 



12 IMondy 

13 Tues. 

14 Wed. 

15 Thurs. 

16 Friday 

17 Sat. 



3l!Basilides 



Tobias 
Helisius 
Vitus 
Rolandus 



bSt. Allans 



3 


2 39 


9 54 


«27| 


4 


3 23 


10 27;c^lO 


5 


4 6 


10 58ci^24 


6 


4 47 


11 27 


M 8 


6 


5 28 


11 57 


^22 


7 


6 10 


morn.'^ 6 


8 


6 53 


12 10>j^20 



5 sets 10 55 
in Apo. 5 in Peri, 

6 S (L- d § super. 

d ? W. d w O ^ 
|| Altair so. 12 14 

flVe^aso. 12 48 



1 


4 '6<6 





4 36 





4 35 





4 35 


slow 


4 35 





4 35 





4 35 



24 
24 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 



25] 3d Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 15. Day's length 14 hours 50 min. 



18 Sunday 


6 


19 Mond'y 


7 


20 Tues. 


8 


21 Wed. 


9 


22 Thurs. 


10 


23 Friday 


11 


24 Sat. 


12 



Arnolphus 

Gervasius 

Sylvarius 

Eaphael 

Achatius 

Agrippina 

John Bapt. 



8 


7 39 


9 


8 29 


10 


9 24 


11 


10 23 


12 


11 25 


12 


morn. 


1 


12 27| 



48|c|g 5 
18«20 

6^18 

39;^ 2 

([rises i^ 16 

8 38^ 



12 
1 
2 
3 
3 



Antares so. 10 31 

H sets 1 47 

^dT?([ ^ 

^([ eel. inv. ([in^ 
in Perigee 





4 35 




4 35 




4 35 




4 34 




4 35 


2 


4 35 


2 


4 35 



25 

26 
25 
26 
25 
25 
25 



26] 4th Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 6. 



Day's length 14 hours 50 min- 



25 Sunday 

26 Mond'y 

27 Tues. 

28 Wed. 

29 Thurs. 

30 Friday 



13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 



Elogius 

Jeremiah 

7 Sleepers 

Leo 

Peter&Paul 

Lucian 



2 


1 28 


^ 12 


^13 


3 


2 27 


9 44 


^26 


4 


3 21 


10 10 


S£ 9 


5 


4 13 


10 58 


^21 


6 


5 3 


11 20 


f-ft 3 


7 


5 52 


morn. 


.f«15 



% souths 7 40 

Regulus sets 10 26 

% stationary 

7* rises 1 46 S 

Arcturus so. 9 47 
Spica sets 12 8 



2 


4 35 


3 


4 35 


3 


4 35 


3 


4 36 


3 


4 36 


3 


4 36 



25 
25 
25 
24 
24 
24 



iviooiM's f>mase:s. 



EASTERN STATES. 
New Moon, 8th, 1 o'clock 22 min. Morn. 
First Quarter, 16th, 4 " 48 " Morn. 
Full Moon, 23d, 9 " 22 " Morn. 
Last Quarter, 29th, 11 "47 " Even. 



CENTRAL STATES. 
12 o'clock 42 min. Morn. 

4 " 08 " Jklorn. 

8 " 42 " Morn. 
11 " 07 " Even. 



WESTERN STATES 

12 o'clock 02 min. Morn 

3 " 28 " Morn 

8 " 02 " Morn 

10 " 27 " Even 



Saturn is in opposition with the Sun on the Uth and shines all night. 



Brethren's Family Almanac. 






*' Well, brudder, look at it in dis way: How would 
you look walkin' de golden streets ob de New Jerusa- 
lem wid dat ole pipe in yo mouf ? " 

" I would jus' snatch it out berry quick." 

"Yes, but what would you do wid it? You could 
not find any place to frow it out ob sight; no place to 
hide it; no way to get rid ob it. You hab been 
gibben a nice white garment to put on and dare ain't 
any pocket in it to put de ole pipe, so you will hab to 
hide it in yo hand." 

" I say, Brudder Jones, you are gettin' a feller in a 
bad fix wid de old pipe, de way you are putting it." 

"But dat ain't all; by and by you will want a 
smoke, and you will walk de golden streets tryin' to 
find a place to hide, so you can smoke; and de 
streets ob dat city is 'bout fifteen hundred miles long, 
and if you should get to de end ob de street you 
would fotch up again de wall dat is made ob jasper, 
and so high you can't clime ober, and no hole in de 
wall to stick yo head for a smoke, and you will want 
a smoke so bad you will almost make up yo mind to 
smoke right in de golden city. Den you will begin 
to think ob gettin' a match to light de ole pipe; and 
den it will come ober you all of a sudden dat dare 
ain't no matches in yo new close. Den yo would 
wish you was back in dis ole worl' again wid de ole 
close, wid de matches, and de ole pipe so you could 
take some comfut." 

" I say, Brudder Jones, I can't stand dat. I can't 
afford to lose dem golden streets for de ole pipe, so 
here it goes, de pipe, de tobacco, de matches, and 
all." 

" Dat is de right way. If you was goin' to a wed- 
den' where would you fix up? " 

" I would fix up at home, ob course." 

"Just so. Now, if you 'spect to go to heaben you 
must get ready down here, for de Church triumphant 
is de folks dat triumph ober all dare sins, by de help 
of de Lord; ober all dare nasty habits, and lib just as 
pure as possible, and hab no wrong thing about dem; 
for de Word says, ' Let him dat is filthy be filthy still, 
and let him dat is holy be holy still,' so you see you 
will be jus' what you are when you fotch up in dis 
worl'." — Selected by Eliza J. McGaughey. 



CORRECTIONS FOR THE LIST OF ANNUAL 
MEETINGS IN LAST YEAR'S ALMANAC. 



In 1865 the Meeting was held at Franklin Grove, 
Lee Co., 111., instead of Antietam, Pa. 

In 1866 the Meeting was held at Antietam, Frank- 
lin Co., Pa. 

In 1871 the Meeting was held at Merkey's, Berks 
Co., Pa., some nine miles northeast of Meyerstown, 
instead of Lancaster County. 

In 1869 the Meeting was held at Peter's Creek, 
Roanoke Co., Va., instead of Millersburg, 



WEATHER FORECASTS. 



If the sun sets in crimson clouds and rises brilliant, 
or if the stars are numerous and bright, we know in a 
general way that we may reckon on a duration of 
fine weather. 

Dews and white morning fogs are symptoms of 
clear days. 

A dark and vapory sun, and a sickly-looking moon 
with blunt horns, and a circle around her, or pallid, 
big and non-scintillating stars are all signs of ap- 
proaching rain. 

If the sun comes up pale and then turns red, or if 
the moon is large and ruddy, with sharp, black horns, 
we may count on wind. 

The chickweed is called "the poor man's barom- 
eter," because it shuts up its flowers when wet is 
approaching. 

The aurora borealis, when very bright, forebodes 
stormy, moist, unsettled weather. 

A haze around the sun indicates rain; it is caused 
by fine rain or mist in the upper regions of the at- 
mosphere. 

A halo around the sun has often been followed by 
heavy rains. 

A halo around the moon is also an indication of 
rain. The larger the halo the nearer the wet spell. 

Lack of dew is another rain sign. 

Sharp white frosts in autumn and winter precede 
damp weather, and three successive white frosts are 
an infallible sign of rain. 

Previous to rain the flies bite sharper and stick to 
us closer, and bees remain in the hive. 

But few of the many signs we have briefly in- 
stanced only apply to the immediate future, and 
have nothing to do with the far-seeing prophets 
whose prognostications also largely based upon nat- 
ural causes, peer into the future months, — nay, years 
in advance. 

HERB CURES FOR THE HOME. 



It has been said,— and justly too, — that for every 
ailment of mankind there is an herb somewhere that 
will cure it, — if we only knew it. We do know, how- 
ever, the efficacy of at least some, and the following, 
from an eminent medical authority, will prove a val- 
uable help to our readers: 

Violet leaves boiled in vinegar will heal gout. 

Twine blossom tea is the best known remedy for 
producing perspiration. 

The blossoms of the mullein, made into a decoction, 
are a useful throat gargle. 



MANY PEOPLE DIE before their allotted time by taking no 
heed of nature's warnings. The body can be practically fortified 
against disease by taking an occasional dose of Dr. Peter's 
Blood Vitallzer, the old time-tried herb remedy. 



J 



7th Month. 










JULY. 




[Days 31. 


Days & Weeks 


5^ 


Remarkable 
Days. 


H 


MOON 
Souths. 

H. M. 


MOON 

Rises & Sets 
H. M. 


Moon's 
Signs. 
S. D. 


Aspects of nanets, and 
Other Misceilanii. 


Slow Rises & Sets. 
M. H. M. 1 H. M. 


1 Sat. |19 


Theobald 


7 


6 41 


12 15 


^27|}2 souths 11 38 ^ 


4 4 86!7 24 



27] 5th Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 5. 



Day's length 14 hours 48 min. 



2 Sunday 


20 


3 Mond'y 


21 


4 Tues. 


22 


5 Wed. 


23 


6 Thurs. 


24 


7 Friday 


25 


8 Sat. 


26 



Visit V. M. 

Cornelius 

Independ. 

Demetrius 

John Huss 

Edulburga 

Aquilla 



8 


7 30 


12 46 


^9 


9 


8 21 


1 4 


^21 


10 


9 13 


1 53 


^ 3 


11 


10 5 


2 15 


^15 


12 


10 57 


2 58 


^28 


12 


11 47 


([ sets 


«11 


1 


12 35 


7 50 


«24 



1/ souths 7 12 
Antares souths 9 30 
in Aphelion 

d ? C- d W ([. 

? rises 2 54 ([in?S''^ 
pkKegulus s. 9 38 
-"'^7- rises 12 44 



4 


4 36 


4 


4 37 


4 


4 37 


4 


4 38 


4 


4 38 


5 


4 38 


5 


4 39 



24 
23 
23 

22 
22 
22 
21 



28] 6th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matt. 6. 



Day's length 14 hours 42 min. 



9 Sunday 
10 Mond'y 


27 
28 


11 Tues. 


29 


12 Wed. 


30 


13 Thurs. 


J 


14 Friday 

15 Sat. 


2 
3 



Zeno 

T. Calvin^ h. 

Pius 

Henry 

Margaret 
Bona vent 

Apostles' da. 



2 


1 20 


8 28 


*t 7 


3 


2 3 


8 58<i^20 


4 


2 45 


9 26 


M 4 


4 


3 26 


9 53 


^18 


5 


4 7 


10 19 


'^1% ■" 


6 


4 48 


10 51 


J5% 17 


6 


5 32 


11 17 


« 1 



d5C 

Vega souths 11 15 

$ sets 9 20 

Orion rises 3 51 

Dog DaysBegin 

% sets 12 2 



5 


4 39 


5 


4 40 


5 


4 40 


5 


4 41 


5 


4 41 


6 


4 42 


6 


4 43 



21 
20 
20 
19 
19 
18 
17 



29] 7th Sunday after Trinity. 



Mark 



Day's length 14 hours 34 min . 



16 Sunday 

17 Mond'y 

18 Tues. 

19 Wed. 

20 Thurs. 

21 Friday 

22 Sat. 



Hilary 

Alexius 

Maternua 

Ruffina 

Eli as 

Praxedes 

Ma?y Mag. 



7 


6 19 


11 45 


«15 


8 


7 10 


morn. 


«29 


9 


8 6 


12 5 


^14 


10 


9 5 


12 58 


^28 


11 


10 7 


2 


^11 


12 


11 9 


3 10 


^25 


12 


morn 


([rises 


^ 8 



dl^C 
^inS 

? in S. d lit C 
dTpC 

7^ r. 12 14 CinS ^ 
O^T? souths 9 10 
O enters (glf 



6 


4 43 


6 


4 44 


6 


4 45 


6 


4 46 


6 


4 47 


6 


4 47 


6 


4 48 



17 
16 
15 
14 
13 
13 
12 



30] 8th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matt. 7. 



Day's length 14 hours 24 min. 



23 Sunday 

24 Mond'y 

25 Tues. 

26 Wed. 

27 Thurs. 

28 Friday 

29 Sat. 



11 ApoUinar. 
12, Christiana 
IS St. James 
USt. Anna 

15 Martha 

16 Pantaleon 

17 Beatrix 



1 


12 10 


7 38 


^21 


2 


1 8 


8 8 




3 


2 2 


8 34 


:g^l7 


4 


2 55 


8 58 


S^29 


4 


3 46 


9 20 


ff*ll 


5 


4 38 


9 43 


^23 


6 


5 ^7 


10 14 


^ 5 



Pollux sets 8 27 

□ I/O 

Aldebaran r. 1 12 S 

T? souths 8 41 

^ in Aphelion 

Regulus s. 8 6 
Pitrel rises 3 1 



49 
50 
51 
52 
52 
53 
54 



7 11 
7 10 
9 



31] 9th Sunday after Trinity. 


Luke 16. 


Day's length 14 hours 12 min. 


80 Sunday 
31 Mond'y 


18 
19 


Upton 
Germanus 


7 
8 


6 18 

7 10 


10 481^17 

11 541^29 


Spica sets 10 6 
S souths 3 12 


6 
6 


4 55 
4 56 


7 5 
7 4 



IVIOON'S F^HASEIS. 



EASTEKN STATES. 
yew Moon, 7th, H o'clock 33 min. Even. 
First Quarter, loth, 7 " Oi " Even. 
Full Moon, 22d, 4 " 43 " Even. 
Last Quarter, 29th, 7 " 44 " Morn. 



CEKTEAL STATES. 
2 o'clock 53 min. Even. 

6 " 21 " Even. 
4 " 03 " Even. 

7 " 04 " Morn. 



WESTEEN STATES. 

2 o'clock 13 min. Even. 
5 " 41 '• Even. 

3 " 23 " Even. 
3 « 24 " Morn. 



Brethren's Family Almanac. 



^ 



Silverweed tea renders good service in case of 
tetanus. 

Wild angelica is recommended for heartburn, — an 
extract being made by boiling its roots, seeds and 
leaves. 

Juniper berries, used for fumigation, make an 
agreeable odor; they also work with similar effect 
taken internally. The berries fumigate the mouth 
and stomach and ward off contagion. Those who 
are nursing fever-stricken patients should chew a 
few juniper berries, — six to ten in a day. They burn 
up, as it were, the harmful miasms. 

Strawberry-leaf decoction will cure skin eruptions 
arising from morbid blood; it also assists a torpid 
iiver. 

Sage purifies the liver and kidneys. 

Wormwood relieves seasickness. 

Tea made of the leaves, blossoms, berries, bark or 
roots of the common alder is a protection against 
malarial fever. 

Eyebright, that salubrious little herb, makes an ex- 
cellent wash for the eyes, — the dried and pulverized 
leaves being made into a tea for the purpose. 

Gentian roots, well dried, cut into small pieces and 
put into brandy relieve cramps in the stomach; 
nausea and attacks of faintness are removed by tak- 
ing a teaspoon of tincture of gentian in water. 

Tincture of dilberries is indispensable for the 
apotheca. A handful put into a bottle of good 
brandy is a mild but good remedy for dysentery. 

Coltsfoot tea purifies the chest and lungs, and is a 
remedy for asthma and coughs. 

The spicy scent of the water mint clearly indicates 
that this little herb occupies an important place 
among medicinal plants. If suffering from a violent 
headache, bind mint leaves across the forehead; mint 
tea, prepared with half water and half wine, assists 
the digestion and cleanses and purifies the breath. 

Nettle leaves, if taken fresh, then dried carefully in 
a shaded place, and made into a tea, will prove val- 
uable in rheumatism. Give freely until relief follows,, 



SUNSTROKE. 



1. Carry the patient carefully, but promptly, to the 
nearest shade. 

2. Secure for him as much circulation of whole- 
some air as may be possibly obtained. 

3. If the skin is hot, sponge with cold water or ice. 

4. If the head is very hot, and the arteries of the 
neck pulsate violently, apply ice. 

5. Give two teaspoonfuls of good brandy or whisky 
every ten or fifteen minutes. The addition of two or 
three drops of laudanum to each dose of the stimu- 
lant prevents vomiting or purging, which is liable to 
occur and often prov^ fatal, 



6. Don't give large draughts of cold water or any 
other fluid, even if the patient is able to swallow 
them. 

7. Don't allow the patient to be moved or raised 
from a recumbent position until sufficiently recovered 
to render it safe to do so. This seldom occurs for 
hours, and often not for days, after the attack. 

8. Send at once for a doctor, not for half a dozen. 
Otherwise valuable time may be lost by differences 
in opinion as to whether the case is one of congestion 
or exhaustion. 

It is always safer for non-professional prescribers, 
and generally safer for doctors, to pursue methods of 
treatment calculated to relieve more or less profound 
exhaustion of vital powers 



AMOUNT OF SLEEP REQUIRED. 



"A healthy infant sleeps most of the time during 
the first few weeks," says the New York State Medical 
Journal, "and in the early years people are disposed 
to let children sleep as they will. But when six or 
seven years old, when school begins, this sensible pol- 
icy comes to an end, and sleep is put off persistently 
through all the years up to manhood and womanhood. 
At the age of ten or eleven, the child is allowed to 
sleep only eight or nine hours, when its parents 
should insist on its having what it absolutely needs, 
which is ten or eleven hours at least. Up to twenty a 
youth needs nine hours' sleep, and an adult should 
have eight. Insufficient sleep is one of the crying 
evils of the day. The want of proper rest and nor- 
mal conditions of the nervous system, and especially 
the brain, produces a lamentable condition, deteriora- 
tion in both body and mind, and exhaustion, excita- 
bility, and intellectual disorders are gradually taking 
the place of the love of work, general well-being, and 
the spirit of initiative." — Scientific American. 



WHERE PENNIES ARE COINED. 



It is not generally known that all the minor coins of 
base metal, such as pennies and nickels, are made at 
the Philadelphia mint, and that nearly 100,000,000 pen- 
nies are coined here every year. This large number 
is occasioned by the fact that thousands of pennies 
are lost annually, and the government has some diffi- 
culty in maintaining a supply. The profit of the gov- 
ernment on their manufacture is large. The blanks 
for making the'm are purchased for $1 a thousand from 
a Cincinnati firm that produces them by contract. 

THE STRUGGLE OF LIFE is hard enough for all, but doubly 
hard for him who is sick and in despair. Dr. Peter's Blood Vi- 
talizer inspires hope in the invalid — after a day's treatment. 
Not a drug-store medicine. Address: Dr. Peter Fahrney, 112-114 
So. Hoyne Ave., Chicago, 111. 



i 



8th Month.] 



f^UGUST. 



[Days 31. 



Days & Weeks 



HO 



f?emarkable 
Days. 



H 



MOON 
Souths. 
H. M. 



MOON 

Rises & Sets 
H. M. 



Moon's 
Signs. 
S. D. 



flspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellanu. 



Sun I sxj-JsT 
Slow Rises & Sets. 
M |h. M. I H. M. 



1 Tues. 

2 Wed. 

3 Thurs. 

4 Friday 

5 Sat. 



20 
21 
22 
23 
24 



Lammas d'y 

Augustus 

Dominick 

Stephen 

Oswald 



8 2 

8 54 

9 44 

10 32 

11 18 



morn. 
12 44 

1 40 

2 43 

3 48 



^11 

^23 

« 6 

^ 2 



H souths 5 21 ^ 

? rises 2 42 
^ stationary 

d ? ([ 



6 


4 57 


6 


4 68 


6 


4 69 


6 


6 


6 


5 1 



7 3 

7 2 
7 1 
7 
6 59 



32] 10th Sunday aftee Trinity. Luke 19. Day's length 13 hours 58 min. 



6 Sunday 


25 


7 Mond'y 


26 


8 Tues. 


27 


9 Wed. 


28 


10 Thurs. 


29 


11 Friday 


30 


12 Sat. 


31 



Tr. of Christ 

Godfrey 

Emilius 

Ericus 

St. Lawren. 

Titus 

Clara 



12 2 
12 14 



25 
6 

47 
30 
15 



([ sets 



<efl6 

M 

)^% 13 

14'^ 28 
50'c^l2 



28 
58 
24 
53 



([ in Apogee 

d?([ 
7* rises 10 58 S 
S sets 8 30 

Orion rises 1 58 
6%(L 



5!5 8 



6 58 
6 57 
6 66 



6 55 
6 64 
6 53 
6 52 



33] llTH Sunday after Trinity. Luke 18. Day's length 13 hours 44 min. 



13 Sunday 


A 


14 Mond'y 


2 


15 Tues. 


3 


16 Wed. 


4 


17 Thurs. 


5 


18 Friday 


6 


19 Sat. 


7 



Hildebert 

Eusebius 

Assn. V, M. 

Rochus 

Bertram 

A gapetus 

Sehaldiis 



6 


5 23 


10 46 


«^6| 


7 


6 35 


11 421^10 


8 


7 51 


morn. 1^24 


9 


8 49 


12 50 


m 1 


10 


9 50 


1 56 


^21 


11 


10 50 


3 7 


^ 4 


12 


11 49 


4 20 


^^^ 



H sets 1 1 40 

Rigel rises 2 
diitC ^ 

T? souths 7 21 ([inS 
Sirius rises 3 40 
d ^ Q inferior 



5 


5 9 


5 


5 11 


4 


5 12 


4 


5 13 


4 


5 14 


4 


5 15 


4 


5 17 



6 51 
6 49 

6 48 

6 47 



46 
45 
43 



34] 12th Sunday after Trinity. Matt 7. 



Day's length 13 hours 26 min. 



20 hunday 


^1 


21 Mond'y 


9 


22 Tues. 


10 


23 Wed. 


11 


24 Thurs. 


12 


25 Friday 


13 


26 Sat. 


14 



8 1 Bernard 
Rebecca 
Philibert 
Zaccheus 
St. Bartliol. 
Ludovicus 
Samuel 



12 


morn. 


prises 


S^ 


1 


12 10 


7 4 


S?13 


2 


12 57 


7 28 


^25 


2 


1 44 


7^59 


f^ 7 


3 


2 26 


8 17 


fP«19 


4 


3 18 


8 44 


m 1 


5 


4 11 


9 14 


^13 



^ ([ in Perigee 
%J T? stationary 
d 5 ? 

% so. 4 5.© ent. ^ 
Vega souths 8 20 
Dog Days End 
7* rises 9 52 



3 


5 18 


3 


5 19 


3 


5 20 


3 


5 21 


3 


5 22 


2 


5 23 


2 


5 24 



6 42 
6 41 
6 40 
6 39 
6 38 
6 37 
6 36 



35] 13th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 10. Day's length 13 hours 12 min. 



27 Sunday 


15 


Gebhard 


6 


5 4 


9 54 


^25 


(^n^Q 


2 


5 25 


6 35 


28 Mond'y 


16 


St.Augustin 


7 


5 57 


10 40 


^ ^ 


nJ£^ 5 stationary 


2 


5 26 


6 34 


29 Tues. 


17 


St. John heh. 


7 


6 50 


11 31 


^19 


d W C Cin^ ^ 


1 


5 28 


6 32 


30 Wed. 


18 


Benjamin 


8 


7 40 


morn. 


« 1 


Altair souths 9 10 


1 


5 30 


6 30 


31 Thurs. 


19 


Paulinus 


9 


8 29 


12 30 


«14 


Tp souths 6 26 





5 31 


6 29 



IVIOOIM' 



EASTERN STATES. 
New Moon, ()th, 6 o'clock 50 min. Morn. 
First Quarter, 14th, 6 " 56 " Morn. 
Full Mood, 20th,U " 47 " Even. 
Last Quarter, 27th, 7 " 44 " Morn. 



3 RMASES. 

CENTRAL STATES. 
6 o'clock 10 min. Morn. 

6 " 16 " Morn. 
11 " 07 " Even. 

7 " 04 " Morn. 



WESTERN STATES. 
5 o'clock 30 min. Morn 

5 " 36 " Morn 
10 " 27 " Even 

6 « 24 " Morn 



BrethrerCs Family Almanac. 



21 



Blanks for nickels are obtained in the same way, cost- 
ing Uncle Sam only a cent and a half apiece. 

Gold is coined in Philadelphia and San Francisco. 
Not enough of it comes into the mint at New Orleans 
to make the coinage of it worth while. Gold pieces 
are the only coins of the United States which are 
worth their face value intrinsically. A double eagle 
contains $20 worth of gold without counting the one- 
tenth part copper. — Scientific American. 



THE LITTLE THINGS. 



How many of us, when we awake in the morning, 
resolve to do all the good we can, and, going out, 
coming in contact with the world, forget to be pleas- 
ant, forget the smile, kind word and act, wanting to 
do some great act? Leaving the little things undone, 
the pleasant good-morning, the grasp of the hand, 
the thousand and one little things that seem so insig- 
nificant to us; yet to some one that is unaccustomed 
to kindnesses, how much it is to them no one but the 
Heavenly Father knows. 

Not a sparrow falls to the ground without our Heav- 
enly Father's notice; and remembering this, let all 
of us do all the good we can, if we can not receive 
the applause of men because we fail to do some great 
act. Let us receive the "Well done, good and faith- 
ful servant; thou hast been faithful over few things, 
I will make thee ruler over many," and be more than 
content. 

WHYS AND WHEREFORES. 



A soap bubble is round because every part of its 
surface is equally pressed by the atmosphere. 

Sheep thrive best in a pasture infested with moles, 
because of the better drainage of the land. 

Boiled water tastes flat and insipid because the 
gases it contained have been driven off by heat. 

Red hair is of that color because it is supposed to 
have a larger proportion of sulphur than black hair. 

Iron bedsteads are safe during a thunder-storm be- 
cause, being good conductors, they keep the electric- 
ity from the body. 

White clothing is cool because it reflects the heat 
of the sun; black clothing is warm because it absorbs 
both heat and light. 

The flesh under the nails looks red because the 
nails are almost transparent, and thus the color of the 
tissue beneath is visible, 

Swallows fly low before a rain because the insects 
they pursue are then near the ground to escape the 
moisture of the upper air. 

A boy's marble placed in a kettle prevents the en- 
crusting of the vessel because the marble attracts the 
particles of lime, and so prevents their adhering to the 
sides of the kettle. 



A heavy dew is the precursor of rain because it 
shows that the atmosphere is saturated with moisture. 

Sea shells murmur because the vibrations of the 
air, not otherwise observable, are collected in the 
shell and by its shape are brought to a focus. 

Flies can walk on the ceiling because their feet are 
natural air-pumps and form a vacuum, so that the 
body is supported by atmospheric pressure. 

A plumb-line by the side of a very large building 
inclines a little from the perpendicular because the 
weight is attracted by the mass of the edifice. 

A red sunset foretells dry weather because it indi- 
cates that the air toward the west, from which direc- 
tion rains may generally be expected, contains little 
moisture. 

A man feels drowsy after a hearty dinner because a 
large part of the blood in the svsterr goes to the stom- 
ach to aid in digestion, and leaves the brain poorly 
supplied. 

The twinkling of the stars forebodes bad weather 
because it shows that there are aerial currents of dif- 
ferent temperatures, thus probably indicating atmos- 
pheric disturbances. 

Woolen goods feel warm because wool is a poor 
conductor of heat, and the goods made of wool con- 
tain within their substance large quantities of air, 
also a poor conductor. 

The voice can be heard to a greater distance 
through a speaking tube than through the air because 
the sound is confined to the air within the tube and 
the tube itself is a good conductor. 

The perfume of flowers is more clearly perceived 
just before or just after a rain because the air, being 
then laden with moisture, better conveys the essential 
oils that constitute the perfumes. 

The day after a heavy snowfall is usually very 
clear because the snow in falling brings down with it 
most of the dust and impurities of the air and leaves 
the atmosphere exceedingly pure. 

A closed room is bad for sleeping because air once 
breathed parts with a sixth of its oxygen and contains 
an equivalent amount of carbonic acid gas; air 
breathed six times will not support life. 

The snow huts of the Esquimaux are the warmest 
dwellings that can be constructed in polar regions, be- 
cause snow is the poorest conductor of heat that can 
be found there, and keeps the warmth of the fire 
within. 

The human system can endure heat of 212 degrees, 
the boiling point of water, because the skin is a bad 
conductor, and because the perspiration cools the 
body. Men have withstood without injury a heat of 
300 degrees for several minutes. 

A MEDICINE WITH A HISTORY dating back to colonial 
times and an unbroken record of success in the treatment ot 
blood and constitutional diseases is Dr. Peter's Blood Vitalizer. 
the iamous root«herb remedy. 



^■BSSB 



9tli Month 








SEPTEMBER. 




[Days 30. 


(y> 

Daus & Weeks ^§ 

FT 


Remarkable 
Days. 


H 


MOON 
Souths. 

H. M. 


MOON 

Rises & Sets 
H. M. 


Moon's 
Signs. 
S. D. 


ftspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellanu . 


Snn 
Fast 

M. 


STunsr 
Rises & Sets. 
H. M. 1 H. M. 


1 Friday 

2 Sat. 


20 Egidus 

21 Eliza 


10 

11 


9 16 
10 10 


1 34 

2 42 


M^^ 27 71 souths 3 34 ^ 
(^10([ in Apogee. 




1 


5 32 6 28 
5 34 6 26 



36] 14th Sunday after Teinity. 



Luke 17. 



Day's length 12 hours 52 min. 



3 Sunday 

4 Mond'y 

5 Tues. 

6 Wed. 

7 Thurs. 

8 Friday 

9 Sat. 



22 
23 
24 
25 

26 

27 
28 



Mansuetus 

Moses 

Nathaniel 

Magnus 

Regina 

JVat. V. M. 

Bruno 



12 


11 25 


3 50 


1 


12 6 


([ sets 


2 


12 47 


6 30 


2 


1 10 


7 3 


3 


1 51 


7 34 


3 


2 25 


8 12 


4 


3 


9 



m. 9 

J^24 
^5^ 9 
^5^ 24 

« B 

«22 



d^([.Spicas.7 56 

STd $ ([. ? in S 
^ Gr. Elong. W. S 
Antares sets 9 44 
$ sets 7 30 

d ^ ([ 

? in Perihelion. (5 !/([ 



1 


5 35 


1 


5 36 


1 


5.37 


2 


5 39 


2 


5 40 


2 


5 41 


3 


5 43 



25 
24 
23 
21 
20 
19 
17 



37] 15th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matt. 6. 



Day's length 12 hours 34 min. 



10 Sunday 


29 


11 Mond'y 


30 


12 Tues. 


31 


13 Wed. 


S 


14 Thurs. 


2 


15 Friday 


3 


16 Sat. 


4 



Fulcheria 

Protus 

J. WicUiffe 

Amatus 

Elev.Holy^ 

Nicetus 

Euphemia 



5 


3 50 


9 50 


m ^ 


5 


4 44 


10 51 


^21 


6 


5 40 


11 57 


^ 4 


7 


6 37 


morn. 


^18 


8 


7 36 


1 4 


^ 1 


9 


8 33 


1 54 


^14 


10 


9 29 


2 24 


^26 



PdT?([ 
T? souths 5 36 ([inS 
d ? O superior 
Sirius rises 12 6 
7* rises 8 36 



4 


5 44 


4 


5 46 


4 


5 47 


5 


5 48 


5 


5 49 


5 


5 50 


6 


5 52 



16 
14 
13 
12 
11 
10 
8 



38] 16th Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 7. 



Day's length 12 hours 16 min. 



17 Sunday 


5 


18 Mond'y 


6 


19 Tues. 


7 


20 Wed. 


8 


21 Thurs. 


9 


22 Friday 


10 


23 Sat. 


11 



Lambertus 

Siegfried 

Micleta 

Erriberday 

8t, Matthew 

Maurice 

Hosea 



11 


10 24 


3 39 


S^ 9 


12 


11 18 


4 25 


S^21 


1 


morn. 


Crises 


fP« 4 


2 


12 11 


6 2 


f?*16 


2 


1 4 


6 28 


fP*28 


3 


1 58 


6 54 


^10 


4 


2 53 


7 26 


^21 



Orion rises 11 44 
^l^c^inS.CinPer. S 
^§Gr.Hel.Lat.N 

Pollux rises 11 50 
Spica sets 6 45 

(7\(^r\\^ • 0^^ Autumn Beg. 
(^enx.^. D.&N. Equal 



6 


5 53 


6 


5 54 


7 


5 56 


7 


5 57 


n 


5 58 


8 


5 59 


8 


6 



39] 17th Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 14. 



Day's length 12 hours 00 min. 



24 Sunday 


12 


St.Johncon. 


4 


3 47 


8 42 


7f* 3 


Andromeda so. 7 45 


8 


6 1 


5 59 


25 Mond'y 


13 


Cleophas 


5 


4 42 


9 33 


*»15 


(^6^(L dins 


8 


6 2 


5 58 


26 Tues. 


14 


Justina 


6 


5 34 


10 30 


^27 


\il^ 7* rises 8 


9 


6 3 


5 57 


27 Wed. 


15 


Cosmus 


7 


6 24 


11 25 


^« 9 


Sirius rises 1 22 ^ 


9 


6 5 


5 55 


28 Thurs. 


16 


Wenceslaus 


8 


7 12 


morn. 


^iB22 


Fomalhaut so. 10 30 


9 


6 6 


5 54 


29 Friday 


17 


St. Michael 


9 


7 57 


12 30 


^ 5 


T? souths 4 37 


10 


6 8 


5 52 


30 Sat. 


18 


Jerome 


9 


8 40 


1 41 


«ri8 


tJJ stationary. CinAp 


10 


6 10 


5 50 



EASTERN STATES. 



iviooiM's f>ihase:s. 

CENTRAL STATES. 



New Moon, 4th, 10 o'clock 35 min. Even. 
First Quarter, 12th, 4 " 51 " Even. 
Full Moon, 19th, 7 " 33 " Morn. 
Last Quarter, 26th, 10 " 04 " Morn. 



9 o'clock 55 min. Even. 
4 " 11 " Even. 
6 " 53 " Morn. 
9 " 24 " Morn. 



WESTERN STATES 

9 o'clock 15 min. Even 
3 " 31 " Even 
6 " 13 " Morn 
8 " 44 " Morn 



Venus is in superior conjunction with the Sun on the 14th, and changes from morning star to 

evening star. 



L . 



Brethren* s Family Almanac, 



n 



Sounds can be heard over water to much greater 
distance than on land because the smooth surface of 
the water offers less impediment to the passage of the 
air vibrations. On calm days the booming of artillery 
at sea has been heard for 250 miles. 



HOUSEHOLD HINTS. 



Corns and Bunions. — These may be helped, and 
ofttimes removed by the constant employment of 
oleate of copper, spread as a plaster. 



To^ Remove Ink. — To take ink out of linen, dip 
the ink spot in pure melted tallow, then wash out the 
tallow, and the ink will come out with it. 



Cancer Cure. — A plaster made of fresh slaked 
lime and fresh tar, is said to be a cure for a cancer, 
which, with its roots, will soon come out. 



How TO Detect Lead. — A simple test for the de- 
tection of lead in drinking water is provided by 
tincture of cochineal, a few drops of which will color 
the water blue if there be the remotest trace of lead 
present. 

For Bowel Complaint. — Seven grains of pow- 
dered oyster shells, and twenty grains each of pow- 
dered salep, sage, and tragacanth, boiled in a pint 01 
milk, form an excellent nutritive diet in the chronic 
bowel complaints of children. 



Toothache. — Many forms of toothache may be 
promptly and pleasantly relieved by chewing cinna- 
mon bark. And cotton, soaked in two parts of 
chloral, ten parts of oil of almonds and sixteen parts 
of glycerine, often allays earache. 



Beef Tea.— Cut a pound of beef into fine pieces, 
place it in an empty jar, without water; cover it and 
stand the jar in a saucepan of water to simmer for 
about six hours. This simple process will yield 
about a teacupful of all there is in the beef. 



A Cholera Remedy. — Cranberries in cholera are 
said to have extraordinary remedial efficiency. Dr. 
Goriansky declares that the use of the pure and fresh 
juice of raw cranberries, given freely, either undilut- 
ed or with an equal part of water, is an excellent 
means of relieving the thirst and vomiting peculiar 
to cholera. In fifty cases, in which ice and narcotics 
failed to make the slightest impression, the cranberry 
juice, in small but repeated doses, rapidly checked 
both vomiting and nausea. A similar statement has 
been made in regard to the fresh juice of crushed 
pineapple for dX^\i'Ca.&:\2L,— Self -culture 



How to Warm a Bed, — Bags of hot sand are 
much better than bottles of hot water to place in the 
beds of invalids who require artificial heat. The 
sand retains heat longer than water, and sand-bags 
are more comfortable "bed-fellows" than bottles. 



A Good Filter. — Chamois leather makes an ex- 
cellent filtering medium. It should be previously 
washed in a soda solution to remove grease, and well 
washed in water after each using. Tinctures, elixirs, 
sycups and mucilages will run through it in a most 
satisfactory and expeditious manner. 



Remedy for Convulsions. — When children are 
suffering from convulsions caused by constipation, 
indigestion or teething, give a hot bath with a table- 
spoonful of mustard in the water, or roll the child in 
a blanket wrung out of hot water, — not so hot as to 
scald the tender skin. Apply cold water to the head 
and administer every fifteen minutes a teaspoonful 
of syrup of ipecac; continue this until vomiting is 
produced. 

Citric Acid in Diphtheria. — For many years an 
English physician has used pure lemon juice as the 
best tonic for diphtheria and sore throat in general, 
an-^ mentions a case in which the son of a medical 
n one of the Paris hospitals cured himself of 
heria by constantly sucking oranges or lemons, 
all basketful of which was placed for this pur- 
pose at his bedside. A Danish physician. Dr. Bock, 
recommends a ten per cent solution of citric acid, 
to be given in spoonful doses every two hours. 



Eat Energetically.— The prevalent idea that 
slow eating is very favorable to digestion is largely 
fallacious, says The Journal of Mental and Nervous 
Diseases. "The important point is not that we eat 
slowly or fast, but that when we do eat we chew with 
energy. Of course, where the haste is due to some 
mental anxiety, this may injuriously inhibit the secre- 
tions. Slow eating begets the habit of simply mum- 
bling the food without really masticating it, while the 
hurried eater is inclined to swallow his food before 
proper mastication. Hence, hurried eating is bad, 
but rapid mastication is advantageous. It concen- 
trates our energies on the act in question, and hence 
more thoroughly accomplishes it. Moreover, ener- 
getic chewing stimulates the secretion of saliva in 
the most favorable manner. These various points 
are so commonly misunderstood, at least by the laity, 
that they demand our frequent attention." 

TWIN SISTERS.— Health and Happiness can properly so be 
termed— the two are inseparable. Dr. Peter's Blood Vitalizer, 
the old, time-tried herb remedy, makes you happy by making 
you well. Not a drug-store medicine. See " ad," page 40. 



lOth Month.] 



OCTOBER 



[Day« 31. 



Daijs & Weeks 



HO 
■<r- 

ro 



Remarkable 
Days. 



^^ 



MOON 
Souths- 

H. M. 



MOON 

Rises & Sets 
H. M. 



Moon's 
Signs. 
S. D. 



flspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellanij. 



Slow 1 Rises & Sets. 
M H. M. I H. M. 



40] 18th Sunday after Trinity. Matt. 20. Day's length 11 hours 38 min. 



1 Sunday 

2 Mond'y 

3 Tues. 

4 Wed. 

5 Thurs. 

6 Friday 

7 Sat. 



19 Remigius 

20 C.Columbus 

2 1 Jairus 

2 2 Franciscus 
23,Placidus 
24Fides 
25' Amelia 



10 


9 22 


2 50 


M 2 


11 


10 4 


4 2 


^17 


12 


11 45 


5 18 


^^ 2 


1 


12 11 


([ sets 


Ift5l7 


2 


12 58 


6 16 


«? 2 


2 


1 45 


7 


«17 


3 


2 10 


7 52 


#^ 2 



d ? O superior ^ 

(^ souths 1 37 S 

fflkSirius rises 1 2 
j^pRigel rises 10 

d ? ([• d ? ([ 

S sets 7 8 

d c? C. d If C 



10 
10 
11 
11 
12 
12 
12 



115 
135 
145 
155 
16 5 



17 
19 



49 
47 
46 
45 
44 
43 
41 



41] 19th Sunday after Trinity. Matt. 9. Day's length 11 hours 22 min. 



8 Sunday 


26 


Pelagius 


3 


2 50 


8 50 


^17 


d lit ([. d T? C 


13 


6 20 


5 40 


9 Mond'y 


27 


Dionysius 


4 


3 35 


9 57 


m 1 


d?? ^ 


13 


6 22 


5 38 


10 Tues. 


28 


Gereon 


5 


4 32 


10 50 


^14 


Orion r.l0 18. (^inQ, 


13 


6 23 


5 37 


11 Wed. 


29 


Burkhard 


6 


5 29 


11 18 


^28 


^dc^l/ 


14 


6 24 


5 36 


12 Thurs. 


30 


Veritas 


7 


6 25 


morn. 


^11 


v^PAntares s. 7 20 


14 


6 26 


5 34 


13 Friday 





Coloman 


8 


7 19 


12 16 


^24 


?in8 


14 


6 27 


5 33 


14 Sat. 


2Fortunata 


9 


8 13 


1 28 


« 9 


A returns sets 8 6 


14 


6 28 


5 32 



42] 20th Sunday after Trinity. Matt. 22. Day's length 11 hours 04 min. 



15 Sunday 

16 Mond'y 

17 Tues. 

18 Wed. 

19 Thurs. 

20 Friday 

21 Sat. 



3 Hedwick 

4 Callus 

5 Florentina 

6 St. Imhe^ ev. 
Ptolemy 
Felic'anus 

9! Ursula 



10 


9 5 


11 


10 37 


12 


11 49 


12 


morn. 


1 


12 12 


2 


12 57 


2 


1 33 



2 37^18 

3 57^ 1 
5 0^13 

([rises'^25 

5 36^ 7 

6 10^18 
6 50^ 



7* rises 6 50 
(J in Perigee 
Aldebaran ris. 8 3 
Altair so. 6 !■ 
r. 12 2 
T? souths 3 21 
Capella souths 3 .- 



feirms 



s 


14 


6 29 




14 


6 30 




15 


6 32 


4 


15 


6 33 




15 


6 34 




15 


6 35 


U 


15 


6 37 



31 

30 
28 
27 
26 
25 
23 



43] 21sT Sunday after Trinity. John 4. 



Day's length 10 hours 46 min. 



22 Sunday 


10 


Cordula 


3 


2 29 


7 36 


7r»12 


Fomalhaut so. 9 17 


15 


6 39 


5 21 


23 Mond'y 


11 


Severinus 


4 


3 23 


8 28 


^24 


dWCOeiit.c^. ([ins 


15 


6 40 


5 20 


24 Tues. 


12 


Salome 


5 


4 16 


9 25 


m. 6 


Orion rises 9 24 '^ 


16 


6 41 


5 19 


25 Wed. 


13 Crispin 


6 


5 5 


10 28 


«18 


/fNd^l/ 


16 


6 42 


5 18 


26 Thurs. 


14 Amandus 


7 


5 52 


11 32 


^ 1 


^^ Andro. so. 9 54 


16 


6 43 


5 17 


27 Friday 


15|Sabina 


7 


6 36 


morn. 


<^14 


Rigel rises 8 30 


16 


6 44 


5 16 


28 Sat. 


lQ\Simon Jude 


8 


7 18 12 35 


«27 


([ in Apogee 


16 


6 46 


5 14 



44] 22d Sunday after Trinity. 



Matt. 18. Day's length 10 hours 28 min. 



29 Sunday 

30 Mond'y 

31 Tues. 


17 Zwlnglius 

18 Serapion 
l^\Hallow Eve 


9 

10 
10 


8 

8 41 

9 23 


1 47 

2 58 
4 8 


^ll'd ? If S 
^2511^ souths 12 25 
^lOMarkab souths 8 36 


16 
16 

16 


6 47 
6 48 
6 50 


5 13 
5 12 
5 10 



IVIOOIM'S PHASES. 



EASTERN STATES. 
Now Moon, 4th, 2 o'clock 1(5 min. Even. 
First Quarter, 12Lh, 1 " 11 " Morn. 
Full Moon, 18th, 5 " 06 " Even. 
Last Quarter, 26th, 4 " 42 " Morn. 



CENTRAL STATES. 
1 o'clock 36 min. Even. 
12 " 31 " Morn. 
4 " 26 " Even. 
4 " 02 " Morn. 



WESTERN STATES. 

12 o'clock 56 min. Even 

nth, 11 " 51 " Even 

3 " 46 " Even 

3 " 22 " Morn 



Brethren's Family Almanac » 



25 



Weak and Weeping Eyes. — Make a strong de- 
coction of camomile, boiled in sweet cow's milk; with 
this let the patient's eyes be bathed several times a 
day as warm as can be suffered without uneasiness. 
Persons almost blind have been cured by persever- 
ing in the use of this prescription. It is proper, how- 
ever, to observe that frequently five or six weeks' 
bathing is necessary. 



How TO Make a Mustard Plaster.— A plaster 
made according to the following directions will not 
blister the most sensitive skin: Two teaspoonfuls 
mustard, two teaspoonfuls flour, two teaspoonfuls 
ground ginger. Do not mix too dry. Place between 
two pieces of old muslin and apply. If it burns too 
much at first lay an extra piece of muslin between it 
and the skin; as the skin becomes accustomed to the 
heat take the extra piece of muslin away. — Ladies 
Home Journal. 

Warts. — A dime's worth of nitric acid will destroy 
a hundred warts. To use, pare off the top of the 
wart, and with a broom straw or pointed stick apply 
the acid to the cut surface. Do not allow it to get on 
the healthy skin. Allow the acid to remain a minute 
or two, and then wash it off. Repeat every day or 
two until the wart is killed. Each time remove the 
yellow skin caused by the former treatment. By this 
gradual treatment any ordinary wart can be removed 
in a few days to a couple weeks and not cause any 
soreness. Nitric acid should be kept in glass or 
rubber-corked bottles. Be careful not to spill it on 
clothes, carpets or furniture. Should such an acci- 
dent happen, pour water on it immediately. 



Virtues of the Apple. — The apple is such a 
common fruit that very few persons are familiar 
with its remarkably efficacious medicinal properties. 
All ought to know that the very best thing they 
can do is to eat apples just before retiring for the 
night. Persons uninitiated in the mysteries of the 
fruit are liable to throw up their hands in horror at 
the visions of dyspepsia which such a suggestion 
may summon up; but no harm can come to even a 
delicate system by the eating of ripe and juicy 
apples just before going to bed. The apple is excel- 
lent brain food, because it has more phosphoric acid 
in easily digested shape than other fruits. It excites 
the action of the liver, promotes sound and healthy 
sleep, and thoroughly disinfects the mouth. This is 
not all. The apple helps the kidney secretions and 
prevents calculus growths, while it obviates indiges- 
tion and is one of the best-known preventives of 
diseases of the throat. Everybody should be familiar 
with such knowledge. — Dr. G. R. Searles^ in De- 
troit Bulletin of Pharmacy, 



Value of Corn Meal.— Professor Atwater, who 
has for many years been engaged in an investigation 
relating to foods for the United States Department of 
Agriculture, has been led to the conclusion, as the 
result of exhaustive study, that, considered from an 
economical standpoint, corn meal has the highest 
nutritious value of all foods. Ten pounds of corn 
meal contain more than eight pounds of actual nutri- 
ment, while the same quantity of potatoes possess 
but three-fourths of a pound of nutriment material. — 
Modern Medicine, 



Danger of Kerosene Fumes. — When New York 
was suffering from an epidemic of diphtheria, the 
Board of Health decided that its presence was to be 
attributed to the fumes of a kerosene lamp turned 
down low more than to any other single cause. 
Whether or not this be so it certainly is a mistaken 
kindness on the part of an indulgent mother to allow 
a lamp to remain in a child's bedroom with the 
flame turned down. A turned-down kerosene lamp 
is a magazine of deadly gas, to which the strongest 
lungs cannot be safely exposed. 



Value of Deep Breathing. — S. Ciccolina advo- 
cates daily attention to deep breathing as a means 
whereby almost every person can induce a vast im- 
provement in general health, besides a permanent 
development of lung power. The method recom- 
mended is to breathe from the abdomen entirely; to 
exhale by the compression of the muscles overlying 
the stomach, and to inhale by expansion or inflation 
of the stomach. The ribs should be motionless dur- 
ing the acts of inhalation and exhalation. The in- 
halation, — through the nose,— should be slow and 
deep, and the air is to be held for a few seconds, 
which can be done after a little practice. It is then 
forced into the upper chest by contracting the abdo- 
men, drawn back into the abdomen by expansion of 
the stomach, and finally exhaled rapidly through the 
mouth. This rapid exhalation has the effect of 
greatly expanding the chest, and the whole process, 
if practiced, at first for a few moments, then grad- 
ually longer until it can be kept up for an hour, 
should be persevered in until it becomes second 
nature. It is quite a potent cure for nervousness, 
even consumption, hysteria and many allied patho- 
logical conditions. Care should be taken that the air 
breathed is perfectly pure, and if the practice is 
maintained indoors the windows of the room should 
be kept open. 



Dr. Peter's Blood Vitalizer has puzzled many by its peculiar 
efficacy in the treatment of all blood and constitutional disorders. 
It goes right to the root of the disease. It acts on the blood, 
eliminating all its impurities. Nature does the rest— health fol- 
lows. 



11th Month.] 



NOVEMBER. 



[Days 30. 



Oaus & Weeks 



KemarKable 
Days, 



MOON 
Souths. 

H. M. 



MOON 

H. M. 



Moon's ftspects Of Planets, and 

Signs. ' 

s. D. i Other Miscellanij. 



SXJKT 
Rises & Sets. 
H. M. I H. M. 



1 Wed. 
"2 Thurs. 

3 Friday 

4 Sat. 



20 
21 

22 
23 



All Saints 
All Souls 
Theophilus 
Charlotte 



10 7 

10 53 

11 42 

12 34 



4 57 

5 27 
(J sets 

5 40 



2^25 

«25 
^11 



(^ souths 1 3 
Sirius rises 10 40 

P'd5(?.d?([.dc?([. 



,6 


6 51 


16 


6 52 


16 


6 53 


16 


6 54 



5 9 

5 8 

5 7 

5 6 



45] 23d Sunday after Trinity. 


Matt. 22. 


Day's length 10 h 


ours 12 min. 


5 Sunday 


24 


Malachi 


2 


1 30 


6 37 


^26 


dJttC 


16 


6 55 


5 5 


6 Mond'y 


25 


Leonard 


3 


2 27 


7 44 


^10 


dT?([. $inS. ([ina ^ 


16 


6 56 


5 4 


7 Tues. 


26 


Engelbert 


4 


3 24 


8 54 


^24 


7* souths 12 48 


16 


6 57 


5 3 


8 Wed. 


27 


Cecilia 


5 


4 21 


10 15 


^ ^ 


d?4t 


16 


6 58 


5 2 


9 Thurs. 


28 


Theodore 


6 


5 15 


11 22 


^20 


Orion rises 8 22 


16 


6 59 


5 1 


10 Friday 


29 


Ma?\ Luther 


7 


6 8 


morn. 


^ 3 


'^Andro. so. 8 57 


16 


7 


5 


11 Sat. J30 


Melanchton 


8 


6 59 


12 20 


^15 


v^^^'^Vega sets 11 56 


15 


7 1 


4 59 



46] 24th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matt. 21. 



Day's length 10 hours 00 min. 



12 Sunday 


31 


Jonas 


8 


7 49 


1 31 


S28 


([ in Perigee S 


15 


7 2 


4 58 


13 Mond'y 


N 


Winebert 


9 


8 39 


2 47 


ffi«10 


6%(d' 6 $V^ 


15 


7 3 


4 57 


14 Tues. 


2 


Levin 


10 


9 31 


3 58 


f?*22 


6^y^ 


15 


7 4 


4 56 


15 Wed. 


3 


Leopold 


11 


10 24 


5 1 


m 4 


Spica rises 4 28 


15 


7 5 


4 55 


16 Thurs. 


4 


Ottomar 


12 


11 18 


5 12 


^15 


d?(^.?Grr.Elong.E. 


15 


7 6 


4 54 


17 Friday 


5 


Alpheus 


12 


morn. 


Crises 


^27 


^^ Orion rises 7 52 


15 


7 7 


4 53 


18 Sat. 


6 


Gelasius 


1 


12 14 


5 30 


^ 9 


^/Altairsetsl0 37 


15 


7 8 


4 52 



47] 25th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matt 24. 



Day's length 9 hours 42 min. 



19 Sunday 


7 


20 Mond'y 


8 


21 Tues. 


9 


22 Wed. 


10 


23 Thurs. 


11 


24 Friday 


12 


25 Sat. 


13 



Elizabeth 

Amos 

Off. VMaly 

Alphonsus 

Clement 

Chrisogenes 

Catharine 



2 


1 10 


6 22 


^21 


3 


2 4 


7 18 


« 3 


3 


2 55 


8 17 


«15 


4 


3 44 


9 21 


«28 


5 


4 30 


10 26 


*rio 


6 


5 13 


11 30 


^23 


6 


5 55 


morn. 


^ 6 



T? souths 1 32 r\ 
7^ souths II 56 
T^so.ll 18. Oent.jjl^ 
([ in Apogee 
SfN Orion rises 7 22 
Sirius rises 9 20 



14 


7 9 


14 


7 10 


14 


7 11 


14 


7 12 


13 


7 13 


13 


7 14 


13 


7 15 



51 

50 
49 

48 
47 
46 
45 



48] 26th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matt. 25. 



Day's lenofth 9 hours 32 min. 



26 Sunday 

27 Mond'y 

28 Tues. 

29 Wed. 

30 Thurs. 



Conrad 

Josaphat 

Guntherus 

Saturn 

TKnk%giv'g 



7 


6 36 


12 38 


^20 


8 


7 17 


1 47 


jsfe 4 


9 


7 59 


2 58 


^18 


9 


8 44 


4 


« 3 


10 


9 32 


5 2 


«18 



d?$. ? stationary g 
d $ T? 

Arietas souths 8 42 
Markab souths 6 36 

dltt ©. d ? c^ 



12 


7 15 


12 


7 16 


12 


7 17 


11 


7 17 


11 


7 18 



45 
44 
43 
43 
42 



IVIOON- 



EASTERN STATES. 
New Moon, 3d, 5 o'clock 28 min. Morn. 
First Quarter, 10th, 8 " 37 " Morn. 
Full Moon, 17th, 5 « 30 " Morn. 
Last Quarter, 25th, 4 " 42 " Morn. 



& PHASES. 

CENTRAL STATES. 
4 o'clock 48 min. Morn. 
7 " 57 " Morn. 
4 " 40 " Morn. 
4 " 02 " Morn. 



WESTERN STATES. 
4 o'clock 08 min. Morn 
7 " 17 " Morn 
4 " 00 " Morn 
3 " 22 « Morn 



Jupiter is in conjunction with the Sun on the 13th and cannot be seen 



Brethren s Family Almanac, 



27 



INFORMATiaN ABOUT MISSION BOARDS. 



For the benefit of the many users of the Almanac 
who are also interested in both the General and Dis- 
trict Missions of the Brotherhood, herewith is given a 
list of the Boards and their organizations as corrected 
on Sept. I, 1898. 

The General Missionary and Tract Committee. 

Chairman, Eld. Enoch Eby, Booth, Kans. 
Vice-Chairman and Treasurer, Eld. D. L. Miller 

Mt. Morris, 111. 
Eld. S. F. Sanger, Manassas, Va. 
Eld. A. B. Barnhart, Hagerstown, Md. 
Eld. L. W. Teeter, Hagerstowji, Ind. 

All correspondence for the Committee should be 
addressed: The General Missionary and Tract Com- 
mittee, Mt. Morris, 111. 

The regular meetings of the Committee are on the 
Monday before the convening of Standing Commit- 
tee at Annual Meeting, and the second Monday of 
February and October. 

District Mission Boards. 

California. 

Chairman, George Chamberlen, Puente, Cal. 
Treasurer, J. D. Buckwalter, 1210 Hawkins St., 

East Los Angeles, Cal. 
Secretary, J. C. Whitmer, Lordsburg, Cal. 

Illinois, Northern District. 
Chairman, D. R. Price, Oregon, 111. 
Secretary, C. H. Hawbecker, Franklin Grove, 111. 
W. M. Felker, Leaf River, 111. 
J. W. Buck, Franklin Grove, 111. 
J. H. Rohrer, Mt. Carroll, 111. 

Illinois, Southern District. 
Chairman, J. D. Gruber, Astoria, 111. 
Treasurer, G. W. Sensenbaugh, Oakley, 111. 
Secretary, S. S. Brubaker, Virden, 111. 
John Arnold, Lintner, 111. 
D. J. Blickenstaff, Oakley, 111. 

Indiana, Northern District. 

Chairman, Henry Neff, New Paris, Ind. 
Treasurer, D. J. Whitehead, New Paris, Ind. 
Secretary, R. W. Davenport, Goshen, Ind. 

Indiana, Middle District. 

Chairman, S. S. Ulery, North Manchester, Ind. 
Treasurer, Aaron Mishler, Collamer, Ind. 
Secretary, A. L. Wright, North Manchester, Ind. 
Emanuel Grossnickle, North Manchester, Ind. 
Leander Pottenger, Claypool, Ind. 

Indiana, Southern District. 
Chairman, William Hicks, New Brunswick, Ind. 
Treasurer, Lewis J. Hooke, Stockport, Ind. 
Secretary, Samuel Mohler, Cambria, Ind. 

Iowa, Northern District, including South Dakota. 
Chairman, Ephraim Lichty, Calvin, Iowa. 
Treasurer, U. S. Blough, Calvin, Iowa. 
Secretary, Jacob Lichty, Eagle Centre, Iowa. 
T. p. Shook, Greene, Iowa. 
J. iCingery, Greene, Iowa, 



Iowa, Middle District. 

Chairman, H. R. Taylor, 1636 Grand Ave., Des 

Moines, Iowa. 
Treasurer, C. Z. Reitz, Maxwell, Iowa. 
Secretary, W. E. West, Ankeny, Iowa. 

Iowa, Southern District. 

Chairman, A. H. Brower, South English, Iowa. 
Treasurer, J. B, Flory, South English, Iowa. 
Secretary, J. D. Coffman, South English, Iowa. 

Kansas, Northeastern District. 
Chairman, I. L. Hoover, Alfred, Kans. 
Treasurer, George A. Fishburn, Overbrook, Kans. 
Secretary, J. W. Mosier, Meriden, Kans. 
Chas. Wampler, Olathe, Kans. 
Geo. C, Shores, Edgerton, Kans. 

Kansas, Northwestern District, including Northern 
Colorado. 

Chairman, John B. Wertz, Quinter, Kans. 
Treasurer, G. Roesch, Quinter, Kans. 
Secretary, Philip Landis, Osborne, Kans. 

Kansas, Southeastern District. 
Chairman, M. O. Hodgden, Galesburg, Kans. 
Treasurer, S. E. Cornelius, Parsons, Kans. 
Secretary, E. M. Horner, Fredonia, Kans. 

Kansas, Southwestern District. 

Chairman, W. A. Roose, Booth, Kans. 
Secretary, F. P. Detter, Nickerson, Kans. 
John Wales, Newton, Kans. 
J. P. Puterbaugh, Nickerson, Kans. 
J. J. Yoder, Monitor, Kans. 

Maryland, Eastern District. 
Chairman, S. H. Utz, New Market, Md. 
Treasurer, Alfred Englar, New Windsor, Md. 
Secretary, Ezra M. Bish, Westminster, Md. 
G. Silas Harp, Ellerton, Md. 
J. P. Weybright, Double Pipe Creek, Md. 

Maryland, Middle District. 
Chairman, David Ausherman, Burkittsville, Md. 
Treasurer, John Roland, Reid, Md. 
Secretary, W. S. Reichard, Hagerstown, Md. 
Samuel Foltz, Hagerstown, Md. 
Jacob Bricker, Downsville, Md. 

Maryland, Western District. 

New District, — not organized in time to report. 

Michigan. 

Chairman, 

Treasurer, David B. Mote, Lake Odessa, Mich. 
Secretary, Peter B. Messner, Lake Odessa, Mich. 
Henry W. Smith, Bismarck, Mich. 

Missouri, Northern District. 

Chairman, S. E. Hogan, Rockingham, Mo. 
Treasurer, G. W. Ellenberger, Turney, Mo. 
Secretary, J. H. Shirkey, Rockingham, Mo. 
J. D. Hildebrand. 
Israel Santee. 



IN OLD AGE, when the natural strength begins to fail, a mild 
invigorating remedy becomes an actual necessity. Dr. Peter's 
Blood Vitalizer is especially adapted for such cases. It 
strengthens the weakened organs and gives renewed vitality. 



i 



r2th Month.] 



DECEMBER, 



Days & Weeks 



HO 



Remarkable 
Days. 



H 



MOON 
Souths. 

H. M. 



MOON 

Rises & Sets 
H. M. 



Moon's 
Signs. 
S. D. 



Aspects of Planets, and 
Other Miscellanu. 



[Days 31. 

Rises & Sets. 
H. M. I H. M. 



1 Friday |19|Longiuus 

2 Sat. 20;Caiididus 



10 23 

11 18 



^ sets 



m l^llp'dlttCOeclip.inv 



10 

\0 



19 
19 



4 41 
4 41 



49] 1st Sunday in Advent. 



Matt. 21. 



Day's length 9 hours 22 min. 



3 Sunday 

4 Monday 

5 Tues. 

6 Wed. 

7 Thurs. 

8 Friday 

9 Sat. 



21 

22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 



Cassianus 

L. J. Heatwole 
born 1852. 

Abigjail 
St. Nicholas 
Agathon 
Cone. V. M. 
Joachim 



1 


12 16 


5 15 


m 4 


2 


1 15 


6 24 


^18 


3 


2 14 


7 34 


^ 2 


4 


3 10 


8 47 


^16 


5 


4 4 


9 55 


!^-29 


6 


4 56 


11 1 


3£12 


6 


5 46 


morn. 


=SE24 



$ sets 6 30 

d (^ T?. d ? O inferior 

(£ in Perigee 
Fomalhaut 
Orion r. 6 18 S 



10,7 

97 
97 
97 



204 
204 
214 
224 



224 
23 4 
23 4 



40 
40 
39 
38 
38 
37 
37 



50] 2d Sunday in Advent. 



Luke 21. 



Day's length 9 hours 14 min. 



10 Sunday 

11 Mond'y 

12 Tues. 

13 Wed. 

14 Thurs. 

15 Friday 

16 Sat. 



28 Judith 

29 Barsabas 



30 

D 

2 

3 

4 



Ottilia 

Lucian 

Nicasius 

Ignatius 

Ananias 



7 


6 36 


12 4 


«* 71 


8 


7 26 


1 13Ul9 


9 


8 17 


2 38L* 1 


10 


9 9 


3 56^12 


11 


10 3 


5 7 


^24 


12 


11 1 


6 14^ 6| 


12 


morn. 


(J rises 


55^181 



d ?}if. $ in Aphelion 
7* souths 10 25 
IMarkab sets 12 28 
Sirius rises 8 27 
Regulus rises 9 51 
^rjv5 stationary 
^"^ (Jeelip. vis.([in23 



7 


7 23 


6 


7 23 


6 


7 24 


5 


7 24 


5 


7 24 


4 


7 25 


4 


7 25 



37 
37 
36 
36 
36 
35 
35 



51] 3d Sunday in Advent. 



Matt. 11. 



Day's length 9 hours 10 min. 



17 Sunday 


5 


18 Mond'y 


6 


19 Tues. 


7 


20 Wed. 


8 


21 Thurs. 


9 


22 Friday 


10 


23 Sat. 


11 



Lazarus 

Arnoldus 

Abraham 

Emherday 

St. Thomas 

Beata 

Dagobert 



1 


12 52 


6 1 


« 


2 


1 15 


7 4 


«12 


3 


1 45 


8 7 


«25 


3 


2 23 


9 12 


m ^ 


4 


3 7 


10 18 


^fTSO 


5 


3 50 


11 4 


^ 3 


5 


4 31 


11 50 


^16 



dT?0. 

Rigel souths 11 21 

Spica rises 2 9 

0£i .^fc Shortest Winter 
y* i^. Day. Begins. 

(J in Apogee 

d?itc S 



3 


7 25 


3 


7 25 


2 


7 25 


2 


7 25 


1 


7 26 


H^ 


7 25 


o 


7 25 



35 
35 
35 
35 
34 
35 
35 



52] 4th Sunday in Advent. 



John 1. 



Day's length 9 hours 10 min. 



24 Sunday 

25 Mond'y 


12 
13 


26 Tues. 


14 


27 Wed. 


15 


28 Thurs. 


16 


29 Friday 

30 Sat. 


17 

18 



Adam, Eve 

Christmas 
Stephen 
John Evan. 
H. Innoc'nts 
Noah 
Copernicus 



6 


5 12 


morn. 


^5% 


7 


5 53 


12 30 


^14 


7 


6 36 


1 40 


^^28 


8 


7 21 


2 50 


«13 


9 


8 10 


3 52 


«28 


10 


9 3 


4 57 


^13 


11 


9 59 


5 54 


<^27 



7"^ souths 9 2 
^ Gr. Elong W 
Orion so. 11 27 
Vega sets 8 50 
Arietas souths 7 32 

d V ([. d ? C 






7 25 





7 25 


1 


7 25 


1 


7 25 


2 


7 25 


3 


7 25 


3 


7 24 



35 
35 
35 
35 
35 
35 
36 



53] Sunday after Christmas. 



Luke 2. 



Day's length 9 hours 12 min. 



31 Sunday! 19|Sylvester |11|10 58| 6 55|i^l2|d T? C« C in ^ ^1 3|7 24|4 36 



IVIOOIM' 

EASTERN STATES. 
New Moon, 2d, 7 o'clock 49 min. Even. 
First Quarter, 9th, 4 " 04 " Even. 
Full Moon, lOth, 8 " 33 " Even. 
Last Quarter, 24th, 10 " 59 " Even. 



5 f>mase:s. 

CENTRAL STATES. 
7 o'clock 09 min. Even. 
3 " 24 " Even. 
7 " 53 " Even. 
10 " 19 " Even. 



WESTERN STATES. 

6 o'clock 29 min. Even 
2 " 44 " Even 

7 " 13 " Even 
9 " 39 " Even 



Saturn is in conjunction with the Sun on the 18th and cannot be seen. 



Brethren s Family Almanac, 



3Q 



_5 ^ 

Missouri, Middle District. 
Chairman, E. E. John, Leeton, Mo. 
Treasurer, John Byerly, Warrensburg, Mo. 
Secretary, M. S. Mohler, Leeton, Mo. 

Missouri, Southern District and Arkansas. 
Chairman, James P. Harris, Cabool, Mo. 
Treasurer, Samuel Wine, Jasper, Mo. 
Secretary, Samuel Gault, Avilla, Mo. 

Nebraslca. 

Chairman, C. J. Lichty, Davenport, Nebr. 
Treasurer, C. H. Price, Beatrice, Nebr. 
Secretary, J. Y. Heckler, Elmwood, Nebr. 

North Dakota, 

Chairman, J. L. Thomas, Cando, N. Dak. 
Treasurer, Wm. Kessler, Cando, N. Dak. 
Secretary, Isaac Wagner, Crary, N. Dak. 

Ohio, Northeastern District. 

Chairman, Tobias Hoover, Chatham Centre, Ohio. 
Treasurer, D. J. Yutzey, Canton, Ohio. 
Secretary, A. I. Heestand, Smithville, Ohio. 
F. B. Weimer, Sterling, Ohio. 

F. Koehler, Youngstown, Ohio. 

Ohio, Northwestern District. 
Chairman, S. A. Walker, Bloomville, Ohio. 
Treasurer, Solomon Rodabaugh, New Stark, Ohio. 
Secretary, Isaac Miller, West Cairo, Ohio. 

G. W. Sellers, Bryan, Ohio. 
Andrew Witmore, Longley, Ohio. 

Ohio, Southern District. 

Chairman, Jonas Horning, Johnsville, Ohio. 
Treas. and Sec'y, Adam Peifer, West Miho'n, Ohio. 
Adam Minnich, Potsdam, Ohio. 
D. M. Garver, Farmersville, Ohio. 
S. A. Erbaugh, New Lebanon, Ohio. 

Oklahoma, No Man*s Land and Indian Territory. 

Chairman, A. W. Austin, Cushing, Okla. T. 
Treasurer, Charles Brubaker, Acton, Okla. T. 
Secretary, I. H. Metzler, Stroud, Okla. T. 

Oregon, Idaho and Washington. 

Chairman, J. B. Lehman, Salem, Ore. 
Treasurer, S. E. Decker, Myrtle Point, Ore. 
Secretary, D. M. Brower, Ashland, Ore. 
Enoch Faw, Cameron, Idaho. 
J. U. G. Stiverson, Oysterville, Wash. 

Pennsylvania, Eastern District and New Jersey. 
Chairman, J. H. Longanecker, Palmyra, Pa. 
Treasurer, J. T. Myers, Oaks, Pa. 
Secretary, I. W. Taylor, Vogansville, Pa. 
H. E= Light, Mountville, Pa. 
J. Y. King, Griffin, Md. 
John Herr, Myerstown, Pa. 

Pennsylvania, Middle District. 

Chairman, George S. Myers, New Enterprise, Pa. 
Treasurer, J. B. Miller, Woodbury, Pa. 
Secretary, J. B. Brumbaugh, Huntingdon, Pa. 

Pennsylvania, Southern District. 
Chairman, Jacob Hollinger, Green Spring, Pa. 
Treasurer, C. L. Pfoutz, Knoxlyn, Pa. 
Secretary, Wm. A. Anthony, Clay Hill, Pa. 
J. A. Long, 800 W. Locust St., York, Pa. 
Henry Beelman, Dillsburg, Pa. 



Pennsylvania, Western District. 

Chairman, W. G. Schrock, Brotherton, Pa. 
Treasurer, P. J. Blough, Hooverville, Pa. 
Secretary, H. A. Stahl, Glade, Pa. 
W. G. Lint, Meyersdale, Pa. 
W. H. Fry, Scalp Level, Pa. 

Tennessee, Florida and Alabama. 

Chairman, J. B. Bowman, Jonesboro, Tenn. 
Treasurer, C. H. Diehl, Jonesboro, Tenn. 
Secretary, J. B. Pence, Limestone, Tenn. 
M. Nead, Matuta, Tenn. 

Texas. 

Chairman, F. K. Bowman, Saginaw, Texas. 
Treasurer, A. J. Wine, Nocona, Texas. 
Secretary, D. L. Kinzie, Muenster, Texas. 

Virginia, First District. 

Chairman, Nathan H. Garst, Salem, Va. 
Treasurer and Secretary, S. L. Shaver, Trout- 

ville, Va. 
T. C. Denton, Daleville, Va. 
Riley Peters, Helms, Va. 
B. F. Flory, Dugwell, Va. 
Fletcher Deaton, Salem, Va. 
Dr. R. T. Akers, Alumridge, Va. 
Z. Keith, Santos, Va. 

Virginia, Second District. 
Chairman, George Miller, Goods Mills, Va. 
Treasurer, J. M. Kagey, Dayton, Va. 
Secretary, D. H. Zigler, Mayland, Va. 
E. D. Kindig, Stuart's Draft, Va. 
A. A. Miller, Sangerville, Va. 

West Virginia, First District. 
Chairman, J. W. Leatherman, Burlington, W. Va. 
Treasurer, P. S. Fike, Eglon, W. Va. 
Secretary, J. H. Cassady, Greenland, W. Va 
Hewet George, Knobley, W. Va. 
Wm. Flory, Tearcoat, W. Va. 

West Virginia, Second District. 

Chairman, G. W. Annon, Thornton, W. Va. 
Treasurer, J. F. Ross, Simpson, W. Va. 
Secretary, Z. Annon, Thornton, W. Va. 

DR. J. L. MILLER, 
Smithville, Wayne Co., Ohio. 



All eye troubles, headache, nervousness, heart 
trouble, spasms, etc., successfully treated by mail 
without seeing the patient. 



"We recommend your glasses to all our friends."— /f-^w H. 
and Sarah Miller, Goshen, Ind. ; D. W. Brennaman and -wife, 
Smithville, Ohio. 

These are not the glasses sold by eye doctors else- 
where. 



BLOOD WILL TELL, if impure, upon your general health; 
strength will be replaced by weakness, your complexion dotted 
with outbreakings oi impurity. More than one hundred years 
ago a root-herb remedy for bad blood was compounded that has 
never been equaled, Dr. Peter's Blood Vitalizer. 



I 



30 



Brethretis Family Almanac. 






I 



J^JP'Any article in this column sent 
post=paid upon receipt of price. 




No. 20I.— Gents' plain white 
pearl-top Cuff Buttons, with good 
strong rolled-plate lever backs. 
Only 30 cents per pair. 

rsio. 202.— Gents' lever-top Col- 
lar Buttons, pure white celluloid 
front and back. Each, 18 cents; 
two for 30 cents. 




No. 57. — Gents' solid aluminum Watch 
Chains. Whiter than silver. Will never tar- 
nish. Length, 11 inches. Price, 75 cents. 

No. 203. — Good medium-weight 
solid silver thimble. Sizes 7 to 12. 
7 is small, 12 is extra large. Q and 
10 are sizes commonly worn. Only 
27 cents each. 

No. 59.— Ladies' fine black silk Watch 
Guards, with snap and slide, all black. Is 
worn around the neck. Price, 26 cents. 

No. 60.— Gents' black silk Watch Chain, 
double strand, bar, slide and snap. Length, 
II inches. Price, 22 cents. 




No. 204.— Extra heavy silver-plated plain- 
tipped teaspoons. One of the biggest bargains 
in my whole stock. I guarantee entire satis- 
faction or money refunded. Price, per set of 
K dozen, only $1.00, post-paid. They are 
worth nearly double this price. Tablespoons, 
same quality, only $1.95 per set of six. Don't 
miss these two bargains. 



■p 



No. 205.— Child's Cup. 
Heavy silver-plate on hard 
white metal. Satin-finish, 
bright cut engraving. 

66 cents each. 




No. 206.— Extra quality silver-plated Sugar 
Shell. Beautifully embossed handle and 
bowl, and only 25 cents, post-paid. 



No. 207.— Best nickel Alarm 
Clock made; 4 inch heavy glass 
dial. Warranted an accurate 
timekeeper. Price, $1.20. 

H. E. NEWCOMER, 

Box 325. Mt. Morris, III. 

.A.1SO see 




Seven=Jeweled Elgins, 



Special Notice to my Patrons:— 

I will fill all orders for these 7-jeweled Elgins at these prices just as long 
as I can, but I advise you not to delay ordering if you can possibly avoid it. 
This grade of Elgin watches is sure to advance soon, and though my stock 
is very large I cannot possibly hope to fill all the orders reaching me from 
nearly every State in the'Union, but on the contrary, at these extremely low 
prices my supply is almost sure to be exhausted by June i, 1899, so I would 
advise you to order as promptly as you can. This warning appliec only to 
watches No. 85 and No. 88. 




No. 85. Price, $5.25. 
Cut Vz size. 



Sectional View 
of Case. 



No. 88. Price, S5. 
Cut ^ size. 



No. 85.— Fine 7-jewel nickel Elgin movement (gentleman's size) in plain 
3-ounce, open-face, silverine, dust-proof case, stem-wind and stem-set. War- 
ranted one year. Price, $5.25, post-paid, and valuable premium free. 

No. 88.— Same as above, except that back of case is beautifully en- 
graved and inlaid in bright colors. Price (including premium), only $5.80, 
post-paid. Address: 

H. E. NEWCOMER, 

Lock Box 325. Mount Morris, III. 



Optical Department. 




Illustratio7i of Straight Temple Frames. 
FINEST QUALITY GLASSES FOR "OLD SIGHT" AT $1.00 PER PAIR. 
To the Brethren:— 

Do you wear spectacles.? Or do the glasses you wear now fail to fit your 
eyes properly? Are you troubled with headache, dimness of vision, or pain 
in the eye balls? Do you know that a pair of right-fitting glasses relieves 
and cures many of the little annoyances so often due to imperfect vision? 
Do you know that I guarantee a perfect fit for simple failing sight, for Ji.oo, 
or money refunded? 

All my glasses are finest quality lenses, in the best nickel-plated frames. 
You can have either straight temple or riding bow at only $1.00 per pair, 
post-paid. (Riding bows hook over the ears.) 

DIRECTIONS FOR FITTING.— Cut from any newspaper or book a sam- 
ple of the smallest print which can be distinctly read without glasses, hold- 
ing the paper in a good light and about 12 to 14 inches from the eyes. Send 
the sample with your order. Also state your age. These instructions are 
for cases of " failing " or " old " sight, and will enable me to fit you properly. 
If you are near-sighted write for special instructions. 

Follow the above directions carefully, and if the glasses fail to fit you. 
send them back and I will refund your money. A good morocco-covered 
case free with every pair. Address, 

H. E. NEWCOMER, 

Lock Box 325. Mount Morris, 111. 

.^d.-vertise3:».e3a.t onn. ^'a.gre 1- 



Brethren s Family Almandd. 



5i 



IL^IlsriSTEI^IJ^Xj LIST. 



Corrected up to and including Sept. i, \\ 



This year a new departure is made in cataloguing the ministers' names, and it is hoped that the change will add to the usefulness 

and convenience of the List. There will, no doubt, be some errors, and for this it can only be said that every effort has 

been made to get the list from each State District correct. Where errors are noticed or omissions occur in any 

way, it will be a favor to have the corrections sent in at once. The star (*) before a name 

indicates that the person is an ordained elder of the church, as reported to us. 



Sweden. 

Anderson, Andreas, Limhamn 
Anderson, W., . . . Malmberg 
Gustafson, A., . . Wanneberga 
Jenson, Per, . . . Wanneberga 
Ohlsson, Hans, .... Malmo 

Olin, O. P Skurup 

Risberg, Jans, . . . Kjefiinge 

Denmark. 

Eskildsen, C. C, . . Hjorring 
Gespersen, Peter S., . Hordum 
Hansen, Christian, . Godthaab 
Johansen, Martin, . . Hordum 
Poulson, P. CFrederickshavn 
Swendsen, Theodor, .... 
. . , Brodrehjemmet.Sindal 

« India. 

*Forney, Daniel L., Bulsar, 
. . . Presidency of Bombay 

*McCann, S. N., Bulsar, . . 
. . . Presidency of Bombay 

Stover, W. B., Bulsar, . . . 
. . . Presidency of Bombay 

Asia Minor. 

Apikian, Stephen, . . Smyrna 
*Fercken, G. J Smyrna 

Alabama. 

Baker, N. R., . . . Citronelle 
Beery, P. H., . . . . Fruitdale 
*Ennis. Marshall M., Fruitdale 
Holderman, Jacob, . . . Acton 

Neff, James M Fruitdale 

Neher, E. J Hollywood 

Satterfield, John, . Yellow Pine 

Arizona. 

*Forney, Peter, . . . Glendale 
Gillett, C. E Glendale 

Arkansas. 

Berkman, D. G., . Texarkana 
Bosserman, J. H., . Knoxville 
*Bradley, F. H., . . Chismville 

Brickey, Allen Jenson 

*Brubaker, Henry, . Knoxville 
Buckmaster, G. W., . Carlisle 
Burnett, P. R., . . St. Francis 
*Click, Samuel, .... Batavia 
Crist, J. E., .... Chismville 

Dawson, M. M Jenson 

*Gephart,J. W., . Arkadelphia 

*Kesler, Benj. E Credit 

Lilly, J. H Lonoke 

*Neher,J.H .Palestine 

Price, M. v., . . . . Harrison 
Reynolds, W. W., . . Rogers 



Shower, R. B Aurora 

Sloniker, Jacob, . . . Palestine 
Watts, Wm. S., . . Brentwood 
*Weimer, Samuel, . Wyman 

California. 

Brubaker, J. S., . . . . Merced 
Chemberlen, Geo. F., . Puente 
Eshelman, M. M., . Pasadena 

*Flory,J.S., 

236 S.Hancock St., Los Angeles 
Franklin, W. K., . Lordsburg 
Funk, Samuel W., . Glendora 
*Gibble, Isaac, .... Hemet 
Holcombe, Henry C, . . . 
317 Francisco St., San Francisco 
Julius. Aaron, .... Dospalos 
Lehmer, S. G., . . . . Covina 
Masterson, B. F., . Lordsburg 
*Metzger, John W., Lordsburg 
Miller, E. A., . . . Lordsburg 
Miller, S.J. , .... Redlands 

*Moore, P. A Inglewood 

*Myers, P. S., looi Main St., 

East Los Angeles 

Neher, John F., . . Lordsburg 
Norcross, D. A., . . Glendora 
Overholtzer, Derius, . . Covina 

Piatt, W. M., Covina 

Prather, Enoch, .... Hemet 
*Thomas, Wm. J., . Inglewood 
*Trostle, J. W., . . .Glendora 
Wetzel, Paul, . . Los Angeles 

Wine, C, Covina 

Yoder, Samuel E Hemet 

Colorado. 

Bashor, Joseph, Weld 

Click, D. M., . Grand Junction 
Early, B. F., . . . . Berthoud 
Funderburg, J. C, Rocky Ford 

Keltner, Lewis E., 

. 1340 Hooker St., Villa Park 

Kinzie,J.H., Iliff 

Hoover, John J., . . . .Macon 
Larick, Henry, . . Longmont 
Love, Leonard F., Castle Rock 
Shuck, J. F., ... .Ft. Collins 

Smith, John L, Wray 

Snowberger, A. C, Longmont 
Watkins, Thomas J., . Palisade 
Whisler, H. A., . . . Hygiene 
*Whistler, Levi, .... Lyons 
Wiedman, Fred, . . Longmont 

Winger, H H Palisade 

Zern, Jacob Amherst 

District of Columbia. 

*Hollinger, Albert, 

349 nth St., S. E„ Washington 



Florida. 

Garman, John H., . . Harlem 
*Hylton, C. D., . . Hawthorn 
Leatherman, J. R., . Wabasso 
Leatherman, L W., . Wabasso 
Stover, D. E Hawthorn 

Georgia. 

Petry, Luther, 

. . . . gS Means St., Atlanta 
Vaniman, A. W., . . . Macon 
Wrightsman, P. R., .... 
261 East Hunter St., Atlanta 

Idaho. 

Faw, Enoch, .... Cameron 
*Johnson, Stephen, . Nezperce 
Thomas, G. W., . . . Nezperce 

Illinois. 

*Amick, Joseph, . Mt. Morris 
*Arnold, John, .... Lintner 

*Baker, J. H Astoria 

Bakener, Fred, . . Leaf River 
Barkdoll, H. M., . Warrenville 
*Barnhart, John, . . Mansfield 
Barnhizer, Isaac, . Mt. Morris 

Beck, Jonas, Astoria 

Bingaman, A. L., . Cerrogordo 
Bingaman, Wm., . . Laplace 
Blickenstaff, D. J., . . Oakley 
Bowers, Peter, . . Parkersburg 

Boyer, Allen, Lena 

Britt, B. F 

.... 317 Elm St., Quincy 
Brubaker, Jonathan, . Virden 
Brubaker, S. F., . Farmersville 
Brubaker, C. C, . Wadsworth 

*Brubaker, J. H Virden 

Brubaker, I. W Laplace 

Bucher, Cyrus, .... Astoria 
Burger, Robert E., Cerrogordo 
Buckingham, Wm. I., Laplace 
*Bucklew, Solomon, . Canton 

Buckley, J. S., Girard 

Butterbaugh, J. W., Maryland 
Campbell, John F., . Idlewood 
Cordier, Joseph, . . . Calhoun 

Cripe, John Hookdale 

*Cripe, George W. .Cerrogordo 
Crouse,J.H., .... Wacker 

Culler, D. D Mt. Morris 

Dale, N. S Cornell 

Delp, Jacob, .... Pearl City 
Delp, Chas. E., . . Pearl City 
Demmy, John C, . . . Astoria 
*Dierdorff, D., Franklin Grove 
Dierdorff, J. W., Milledgeville 



Eavey, George W., . Calhoun 
*Eby, David B., .... Lena 
*Eisenbise. W. H.. Mt. Carroll 

Fahrney, Callo, Polo 

Fergusen, Ashley Erie 

Filbrun, B. F., . . . . Auburn 

Filburn,J.J Mt. Morris 

*Fitz, John, Astoria 

*Fitz, Conrad, . . Leeseburg 
*Flory, Michael, . . . Girard 
Forney, C, . . . Parkersburg 
*Forney, Edmund, Pine Creek 
Forney, Henry, .... Chenoa 

Fonts, S. S Salem 

*Frantz, David, . Cerrogordo 
*Garber, S. W., .... Allison 
Gerdes, David, . . . Morrison 
Gibson, Javan, .... Girard 
Gibson, Charles, .... Girard 
Gibson, Cullen C, . . . Girard 
*Gibson, D. B., . . Cerrogordo 
Gilbert, Frank, . . Pearl City, 
Goodman, John W., . Woburn 
Grater. W.H., .... Malvern 
Hamm, Solomon D., . Astoria 
Harshbarger, Isaac, . . Girard 
*Harshbarger, J. W., . Girard 

Heckman, John, Polo 

Heitz, S Cerrogordo 

Hershey, Daniel, . Mt. Morris 
Hicks, Oliver Z., . . Idlewood 
*Hollinger, Joseph, . . Astoria 
*Hollinger, Daniel, . . Astoria 
Hummer, S. S., . . Colchester 
Ikenberry, W. L., . Mt. Morris 

Jellison, J. H., Allison 

Jones, Joseph, Girard 

Keiser, Thos Roanoke 

*Keltner, P. R., 

... 702 E. gth St., Sterling 
Landes, Hiester, . Cerrogordo 
Leedy, Amos, . Williamsburg 
*Lehman, Samuel, Jr., . . 

Franklin Grove 

Lierly, Wm. R Clayton 

*Lilligh, H., . Mulberry Grove 
Lingenfelter, Mathias, Canton 

Lucas, C Prairie City 

*Lutz, A. H., Waddams Grove 

Lutz, Ezra, Winslow 

*Lyon, Thomas D., . Hudson 
*Martin, Henry M., . Lanark 
*McClure, M. J.. . Cerrogordo 
McDannell. D. S., . Mt. Morris 
McNelly, Calvin, . Mt. Morris 
Metz, Clifford W., . . Trimble 
Miller, John E., . . Mt. Morris 

Miller, S. S., Laplace 

*Miller, D. M., .Milledgeville 



32 



Brethren s Family Almanac. 



♦Miller, D. L„ . . Mt. Morris 
Miller. W. R., 

. 466 Jackson Boul., Chicago 
♦Mohler, Daniel, Burrowsville 
Moore, Wm. K., .... Nora 
*Moore, J. H., . . Mt. Morris 
♦Myers, Jacob L., . . . Coleta 

Myers, Isaac, Fandon 

*Myers, Franklin . , . Lanark 
♦Nevinger, G., . . . . Hissong 
♦Newcomer, M. S., Mt. Morris 
♦Newcomer, E., . . Mt. Morris 
Newcomer, Samuel I., Lanark 
Pittman, Henry E., . Loraine 
Pollock, Alvin, .... Batavia 
♦Price, David E., . Mt. Morris 
Price, E. W., . Franklin Grove 

Price, C. C Polo 

Puterbaugh, D. B., . . Lanark 
♦Raffensberger, Levi, . . . 

Franklin Grove 

Roddis, Charles Ipava 

♦Rowland, David, . . Lanark 
♦Rowland, C. P., . . . Lanark 
♦Royer, J. G., . . . Mt. Morris 
Royer, Galen B., . Mt. Morris 
Senger, D. B., Franklin Grove 

Shultz.JohnF Chenoa 

Snively, J. S., Lanark 

♦Solenberger, Jacob, Naperville 

Stees, Israel, Lena 

Stitzel, Joseph, .... Lanark 
♦Stoner, J. C, . . Hutsonville 
Stookey, Sherman, . . Fandon 
♦Stouffer, M., . . . Mansfield 
Strickler, Baptist H., Loraine 
♦Strickler, H. W., . . Loraine 
Studebaker, Samuel, Pearl City 

♦Suter, CM., Ashton 

Swinger, Jacob, . . Hutsonville 
Taylor, Allen, . . Brownstown 
Trostle, W. E., . . . Stratford 

Trostle, Eph Mt. Morris 

♦Trostle, Levi, Franklin Grove 
♦Trout, I. Bennett, . . Lanark 
♦Troxel, David, . . Cerrogordo 
Ullery, Daniel, .... Divide 

♦Ullery, Jacob Laplace 

VanDyke, G. H 

183 W. Hastings St., Chicago 
Wagner, D. W., Beecher City 
Wallace, Lewis, . . Maryland 

Wirt, James, Virden 

Wyne, Jacob Laplace 

Young, I. R Lanark 

♦Yundt, Simon E., Mt. Morris 

Indiana. 

Ahner, J., 

251 S. Walton Ave., Ft. Wayne 
Alldredge, J. S., . . Anderson 
Appleman, John, . . Plymouth 
Baker, N.E.,. . . . Dogwood 
Barnhart, Jacob, . Twelvemile 
Barrick, Isaac, . . . Portland 
♦Barton. James, . . . Corunna 
Beckner, E. L., . . . . Argos 
♦Berkey, 1. L., . . . . Goshen 
Billheimer, Isaac, . Edna Mills 

Blessing, S. A Kewanna 

♦Blickenstaff, S Flora 

Bock, Daniel Kokomo 

Bohn, J.S Peru 



Bollinger, B. B., Shipshewana 
Bollinger, Daniel, Shipshewana 
Borough, Wm., North Liberty 
♦Bowers, A. J., . Kirkpatrick 
Bowman, J. W., . Hagerstown 
Bowman, Jacob, . Hagerstown 
♦Bowman, D. E., Hagerstown 

Bowman, A Hagerstown 

♦Bowser, W.H., N.Brunswick 

♦Bowser, G. W Arcadia 

Brallier, H. H Pierceton 

♦Branson, Isaac E., Cammack 
Bridge, Albert, . , Monticello 
♦Brubaker,D.M., Williamsport 
Brubaker, Ellis S., . . . Peru 
Brunk, Henry, . . Greentown 
Burcham, Wm , . Noblesville 
Burket, Samuel E., Sevastopol 
Bussard, Wm., .... Milford 
Byerly, Daniel M., . Curryville 
♦Campbell, D.C., . . . Colfax 
Caylor, Abraham, . Greentown 
♦Caylor, John H., . Clarksville 
♦Caylor, D. S., . . . Somerset 
Christian, John H., . Roanoke 
Clapper, Sherman, . . Seafield 
♦Cline, Geo., .... Kempton 
Cobb, E. M., North Manchester 

♦Cripe, Jacob Dego 

Cripe.D.C, North Manchester 
Cripe, John W., . . . Goshen 
♦Cripe, Nathaniel, . Hillisburg 
Cripe, Israel, . . . Montpelier 
Cross, J.J. (deaf mute), Sidney 

Crosswhite, A. G Flora 

♦Crumrine, N. W., . Wabash 

Davis, C, Dunkirk 

Deardortf, Henry, . . . Argos 

Deal, John Pyrmont 

♦Deeter, W. R., . . . Milford 

Deeter, Manly Milford 

♦Dilling, David, . . Monticello 
Dilling, Levi S., . Hagerstown 
Dilling, George, . . Monticello 

Dillman, Morris Peru 

♦Dunbar, L. M., . Darlington 
Dunbar, Peter, Bowers Station 
Early, Isaac, . . North Liberty 
Early, S. P., North Manchester 

♦Eby, D. F Westfield 

Eby, Adam, Wawaka 

Eikenberry, John, . Plumtree 

Filer, Calvin F Shideler 

Ellis, O.C. River 

Elson, J. H., . Fairfield Center 
Everson, Thomas, . . Ladoga 
Eversole, Simon P., . Bremen 
♦Fadely, H. L., . Honeycreek 

Fair, C. G Garrett 

Felthouse, J. V., . . . Markle 
Ferrel, A. J., ...... Ober 

♦Fesler, Frederic, .... Ovid 

Fink, Samuel, .... Geneva 

Finney, Wm., . . . Ft. Wayne 

Fisher, Irvin, Mexico 

♦Fisher, Noah, . . . Andrews 
Fisher, Frank, .... Mexico 

Fisher, Ira, Colfax 

Fisher, Enos, .... Kewanna 

Flora, Riley, Flora 

Flory, A. J., Flora 



Forney, Hiram, .... Milford 
Frank, D. R., . . . . Somerset 
Frantz, Mathias, . . . Ladoga 
Frantz, John F., . . . Wabash 

♦Frederick, J. E., 

♦Freeman, D. R., . . Star City 

Gable, Eli, Plymouth 

Garber, Henry P., . . Portland 
Garber, D. B., . . . . Hanfield 
Goshorn, Benj. F., . Clay City 
♦Goshorn, R, R., . . Clay City 
Grady, Isaac S., . . . Syracuse 

Guinn, Isaiah Heath 

♦Gump, Jeremiah, .... Ari 
Gustin, D. \V., . . Middletown 

Hale, Darlin Bourbon 

Hahn, M. L Flora 

Hahn, J., Lakeside 

*Harshbarger,Wni. R., Ladoga 
Hartman, D. B., . South Bend 
Hartsough, Joseph, Nappanee 

Hartsough, John Knox 

Hatcher, Wm. L., Adamsboro 
Hay, Frank E., . . Anderson 
Hazlett, James L., . Rossville 
Heeter, N. B., . . Millersburg 
Heeter, G. B., . . Huntington 
Heller, Jacob, .... Decatur 
Helman, James Q., Union City 
Hedricks.S. F., . . Plymouth 

Hess, Aaron Goshen 

Hess, Wm Goshen 

Hiatt, Elihu, Rigdon 

Hildebrand,C., . . South Bend 

♦Hilderbrand, Jacob 

Walkerton 

♦Hillery, Lemuel, . . . Goshen 

♦Hill, James, Cicero 

♦Hodgden.Dorsey, Pluntington 
Hoke, Henry, . . . Rehoboth 

Hoke, Levi Goshen 

Holler, George, . . Huntington 

Hollinger, David, 

North Manchester 

♦Hollinger, Jacob 

North Manchester 

♦Holsinger, L. T., 

Nortli Manchester 

Holsinger, Merton, Clarksville 
Hoover, David E., . . Garrett 

♦Hoover, David F. 

Sulphur Springs 

Hoover, J. L., Sulphur Springs 
Hoover, Jacob, . . Hagerstown 
Hostetter, D. W., Wappccong 
♦Houk, Peter, . . . Ridgeway 
♦Howard, I. J., . Hartford City 

Huber, Lewis Berne 

Huber, Calvin A., . . Ligonier 
Huffman, Lewis, . . .Mt.Zion 
Huffman, Peter, . . . Elkhart 
Humbarger, Loren, .... 

Columbia City 

Hummer, Fred, .... Blaine 
♦Hyer, Leonard, . . Merriam 
Jones, D. H., .... Dunlaps 

Joseph, J. E Bourbon 

Karns, Gabriel, .... Eaton 
♦Kauffman, J. S., . Burlington 
♦Keim, Howard H., . Ladoga 

♦Keller, G Bunkerhill 

Kendall, Amos, .... Plevna 
Kennedy, James, . . Camden 



♦Kinsey, Lewis, . Hagerstown 
Kirklin, J. R., New Burlington 
Kitson, John W., . Millersburg 
Kittcrman, G., . . Montpelier 
♦Kreider, D., . South Whitley 
♦Kreighbaum, H. W.. S. Bend 

Kulp, J.S Dunlaps 

Landis, Henry, . . Bringhurst 
Lanter, George M., Union City 
♦Leckrone, S.. . N. Manchester 
Leckrone, Em., . . Silverlake 
♦Leedy, Joseph, . . . Andrews 
♦Leer, Benjamin, Shipshewana 

Lesh, John Flora 

Livengood, Wm., . . Wabash 
♦Long, Peter, .... Brighton 

Long, Daniel H Peru 

♦McCarty, Jno.S., . Clarksville 

Metz. O South Whitley 

♦Metzler.J., .... Wakaruga 
♦Miller, M. C, N. Manchester 
♦Miller, Isaac, . N. Manchester 
♦Miller, Alexander, Wakarusa 
♦Miller, D. P., . . South Bend 

*MilIer, J. H., Goshen 

Miller, Robert, .... Roann 

Miller, J. W Eaton 

Miller, William, . South Bend 
♦Miller, Thurston, . . Laporte 

Miller, Martin, Jalapa 

Miller, J. R Nappanee 

Miller, John A., . New Lisbon 

Miller, J. A., Landess' 

Millspaugh, H. E., . . Gilman 
Mishler, John, . . Middlebury 
Mitchel. John, . . Saline City 
Montgomery, Riley, . . Flora 

♦Moss, Aaron Landess 

Mourer, John H., . . Goodland 

Mow, A. I., Argos 

♦Murray, Samuel, . . . Mexico 
♦Murray, J. C, . . .Nappanee 
♦Myers, Wm., . . . .Bourbon 
Myers, George W., . . Laconia 
Myers, Samuel, .... Mexico 
Nead, Daniel P., . . . . Nead 

Neal, Wm. F Packerton 

♦Neff. A. L 

. . 621 New M. St., Goshen 

Neff, W. B Milford 

♦Neff, David Roann 

♦Neff, Benj., . . N. Manchester 
♦Neff, Daniel, . . . New Paris 

Neff, James Milford 

Neff, Henry, Roann 

Neff, Henry, .... New Paris 
Neher, Amos A.. . . Mulberry 
♦Nehcr, Samuel, . . Petroleum 
Noffsinger, Ezra, . Union City 
Nusbaum, John, . . Wakarusa 
Painter, G. \V., . . Springport 

♦Parker, I. D. Elkhart 

Payton, S. W., . . Connersville 
♦Phields, Samuel, .... Lima 
Popejoy, Wm. A., . . . Poneto 
Pottinger, Leander, . Claypool 
♦Puterbaugh, A. H., . Elkhart 
Rarick, John G., . . Royerton 
♦Rarick, Jacob, . . . Royerton 
Rensberger, Melvin 

North Manchester 

♦Replogle, David, Rogersville 



■'-■■^^ 



Brethren's Family Almanac. 



33 



Richard, D. R., . . . Fortville 
Richardson, Scott, . Millgrove 

Rife, Jacob, Boston 

Rife, Joseph D., . . Converse 
*Riggle, Daniel, . . . Goslien 
*Rinehart, Abram, . . Onward 
Ritzins, Henry, . Leiters Ford 
Ritzins. Noah, . Leiters Ford 
Rodgers, J. C, . Hartford City 
Roose, Hiram, . . . Wakarusa 

*Roose, Eli Wakarusa 

*Rothenberger, D., N. Webster 
Rufner, Geo., Fairfield Center 

Rutf, Edward, Argos 

Rupel, C. F Walkerton 

*Rupel, Andrew, . N. Liberty 
Schrock, J. H., • • Middlebury 
Schwalm, H. M., . . Wakarusa 

Secrist, Jacob S Eugene 

*Sellers, JohnH., . . Bourbon 
Shepler, Isaac, . . Bunkerhill 

Sherrick, M. M 

North Manchester 

*Shideler, Daniel, . . Majenica 
*Shively, G.B., . . . . Topeka 
Shively, John W., . . Bourbon 
*Shively, David, . . • Bourbon 
Shively, Jacob B., . . Burroak 

Shively, John, Flora 

*Shively, Daniel, . . . Goshen 
*Shively, Daniel P., . . . Nead 
Shock, Warren D., Huntington 

*Shotts, M. C, FUnt 

Shrock, Eli Lagrange 

Shutt, N. H Brighton 

Shreve, R. J., - . . Waterford 
*Simmons, W. K., Union City 
*Sineltzer, Elias, . . . Arcadia 
Smeltzer, Moses, . Noblesville 
*Snell, Jacob S., . . . Collamer 

*Snell, Daniel Sidney 

Snowberger, Isaac N., . . Flint 
Sommers, Harvey, . Clay City 
Sonefrank, Geo., McGrawsville 
Speicher, Jacob B., 

North Manchester 

Spitzer, Joseph F., Summitville 
♦Stafford, John, . Spencerville 
Steckley, Henry, . . . Garrett 
Stinebaugh, Gilbert, . . Flora 
Stoneburner, Levi, . . Warsaw 
Stoneburner, J. W., . Peterson 
Stoner, Samuel D., . . Ladoga 

Stout, John, Millwood 

Stout, Thos. J., . . Sharpsville 
Strausburg, John, . . . Jalapa 
Stuckman, P., • ■ • Nappanee 
*Studebaker, J. U., . Shideler 
*Studebaker, Geo. L., ... 

. 117 S. Council St., Muncie 
Swihart, David, .... Roann 

*Swihart, Aaron Argos 

Swihart, Neri Bigfoot 

Swihart, Walter, . Churubusco 
*Swihart, George T., . Goshen 
Teeter, Lewis L., . Rogersville 
*Teeter, L. W., . Hagerstown 
Thompson, Samuel, Sycamore 
Toney, Carey, . . Connersville 

*Toney,W. S Walton 

Ulery, Gabriel 

, , . , , Y\<^x\-\\ Manchester 



Ulery, J. Edson, N.Manchester 
*Ulery, S. Stephen, .... 

North Manchester 

*Ullery, John Pyrmont 

Urey.S. C, . Fairfield Center 
Urey, J.H., . Fairfield Center 
Wageman, Jno. G., Tyner City 
Warren, Edward, . Sevastopol 
*Warstler, J. H., . . New Paris 
*Weaver, Joseph, . . Ligonier 
Weaver, D. H., North Liberty 
*Weaver, Christian, Brimfield 

Weaver, John E Goshen 

Wehrley, J.P Flint 

*Wellington, J. R Reed 

*Whitmer, Daniel, South Bend 
Whitmer, Merrill I., . . . . 

South Bend 

*Wike, Henry, River 

Wike, Isaac, .... Mooreland 
Winger, Otho, . . . Sweetsers 
*Winklebleck, Levi, .... 

Hartford City 

Wise, A. A., . . . Middlebury 

Witter, E. C Mexico 

*Wolf, David B Peru 

Workman, Levv'is, . Pierceton 
Workman, David, 

Columbia City 

*Wray, Benj Camden 

*Wright, A. L., 

North Manchester ' 

*Wright, J. H., . . Huntington 
Wysong, Daniel, . . Nappanee 
Yaney, Frank, . New Corydon 

Yoder, Y. D Lima 

*Younce. Samuel, . . . Eaton 

Young, E. S 

North Manchester 

Young, A. C, Eaton 

*Zollers, Geo D 

545 Gushing St., South Bend 
Zumbrun, C. K., . . Merriam 

Iowa. 

Albright, Wm 

Steamboat Rock 

Allen, J. Rothrock, . Dumont 
Allen, Harvey W., . . Dumont 
Atkinson, Robert, . Kingsley 
*Badger, Robert, . . . Panther 
Badger, Samuel, . . . Panther 
*Bailey, John P.-, . . Mt. Etna 
Beale, Jesse, .... Waterloo 
*Beaver, O. J., Fredericksburg 
*Berkman, Hiram, . . Fredric 

Blough, A. P Waterloo 

Bosserman, Levi D 

Prairie City 

*Bowser, Sar.iuel, . . . Conrad 
*Brower, Jacob, South English 
*Brower, C. M., South English 

Brovver, Alfred, Dale 

Brower, S. F., . South English 
Brower, Peter, . Sc uth English 
Brower, Jacob J., Marshalltown 
*Brubakei, D. E., . . Panther 
Buck, Abraham, .... Ireton 
Cakerice, John, Conrad Grove 
Coffman, H. C. N 

South English 

Connell. B. F Brooklyn 

*Dierdorff, Daniel T., Pierson 
Dierdorff, M., Yale 



Diehl, John, .... Carnforth 

Diehl, J. B., Carroll 

*Diehl, J. W., Panora 

*Early, John, Aurelia 

Eikenberry, J. E., 

Farnhamville 

Eikenberry, Harvey, . Greene 

Eikenberry, J. F Greene 

Emmert, M. W., Cedar Rapids 
Eshelman, J. H, . . . Batavia 
Farneman, Frank, Des Moines 

Fike,J. H Waterloo 

Fitz, John Panora 

Fitzwater, P. B Sheldon 

Flora, A. W., .... Maxwell 
*Flory, Samuel, South English 
Folger, W. W., ... Folger 

*Follis, John Fredric 

Frederic, C, . Grundy Center 

Funk, Peter, Gallion 

*Gable, John, Ollie 

Garner, Chas., Grundy Center 
Gibson, G. W., . . . Maxwell 
Gilchrist, Joseph, . . Fairfield 
Gilliam, H., . Fredericksburg 
*Glotfelty, James, Libertyville 
Glotfelty, Wm. N., Libertyville 
*Goughnour, S. M., . . Elkhart 
Goughnour, James Q., Elkhart 
Hagerman, Geo., . . Toddville 

Hall, Larkin Montour 

Harman, B. J., . Bladensburg 
*Haughtelin, J. D., . . Panora 
Haughtelin, Irving, . . Panora 
Herman, Michael, . . . Adair 

Hiatt, M., Avoca 

Hiatt, Nathan C, . . Atlantic 
Holder, Daniel, .... Batavia 
Hopwood, G. W., . Deepriver 
Jones, J. Edwin, Grundy Center 
Keller, J. H., . . . Livingston 

Keller, J. E., Tipton 

*Kob, L. M., . . Gardengrove 
Krewson, Wm. A., Cincinnati 
Leavell, O. W., . . Unionville 
Lehman, Franklin, . . Pierson 

Lichty, W. H Waterloo 

Long, W. Joseph, . . . Tipton 
Long, W. H., .... Garrison 
Markley, David, . . . Mt. Etna 
Mathis, Jefferson, . Winterset 

Maust, C. H., Struble 

Maust, H. F., Struble 

*McCune, R. F., Dallas Center 

McNutt, C. S., Adel 

Miller, S. P., . . . New Sharon 

*Miller, S. M Calvin 

*Miller, S. H Waterloo 

Miller, S. B Zearing 

Miller, N. J., . . . . Waterloo 
*Miller, B. F., . Dallas Center 

*Miller, D. A. Lemars 

*Miller, S. C, .... Maxwell 

Miller, D. W., Robins 

Moats, John W Altoona 

Mortin, Silas, .... Corning 

*Myers, Michael, 

. . . 701 Devoe St., Creston 
Myers, Abram, .... Panther 
Myers, Joseph L., . . . Harlan 

Myers, Tobias Sheldon 

*Nicodemus, Albert, Kingsley 



Ogden, Orlando, . . Unionville 
Peifer, L. R., 

.... 1102 S. St., Waterloo 

Pyle, W. H Hansen 

Rambow, Geo., Douds Station 
Reeves, Alfred H., . . Dickens 
*Replogle, Martin, . Unionville 
Ridenour, John, . . . Garrison 
Rodabaugh, Willis, . . Fredric 
Rodabaugh, E. G 

Birmingham 

*Rolston, J. E., . . . Sheldon 

Rowe, Chas Grimes 

Sadler, J. W., . . . Limespring 
Sanger, Anthony, . . . Keota 

Sayler, Levi, Quarry 

Schmidt, John G., 

Strawberry Point 

Schmidt, Chas. C, 

Strawberry Point 

*Schultz, Joshua, . . Ellwood 
*Shamberger, Geo. A., . . . 

Dahas Center 

Shellenberger, S. H., . Biddick 

Shick, J. N., Lowden 

Simpson, A. P Mt. Etna 

Sink, David, .... Mt. Etna 
*Sissler, M., . . Dallas Center 
Sloatman, S., . Missouri Valley 
*Snyder, T. G., . . . . Robins 
*Snyder, J. S., . . Brooklyn 
Snyder, L. S., Missouri Valley 

Spicher, J Waterloo 

*Stickler, W. E , . Centerville 

Stieneke, F. S Aurelia 

*Stone, C. H., . . . Edgewood 
Stone, Henry, . . . Edgewood 

Stouffer, E. H Garrison 

Stout, W.J Leon 

*Strickler, H. P., 

Grundy Center 

Sutter, P. J., Laurens 

*Taylor, H. R 

1636 E. Grand Ave., Des Moines 
Troup, Henry H., . . Maxwell 
Webb, Isaac E., . Newmarket 
Weber, John, . Dallas Center 

West, W. E., Ankeny 

Wheeler, Frank M., . Rockton 
Wingert, Harry H., . . Galva 
Wolf, F. B., . Fredericksburg 
*Wolf, Abraham, . Libertyville 
*Zook, Daniel, . Birmingham 
*Zuck, John Clarence 

Kansas. 

Andes, Levi, Newton 

*Arnold, C. E., . . McPherson 
Armentrout, G. W., . Dighton 
*Barnhart, D. B., . Appanoose 
Basehore, G. H., ...... 

Box 495, Abilene 

Basket, B. S Sabetha 

Baumbaugh, J. S., . Moonlight 
Beckner, W. O., . McPherson 
Beeghly, Josiah, . . . Sabetha 
Beery, Salem, .... McCune 
Betts, David, . Independence 
Blickenstaff, Jesse, . . Ottawa 
*Bowers, David, . . . Sabetha 
Bowman, Daniel, . . Burroak 

Bowser, J.J Cleveland 

Boyd, A. L., . . . . Brazilton 
Braramell, H. L., . . Ozawkie 



34 



Brethren s Family Almanac. 



Brough, Jacob A., . . . Galva 
Brower, John, .... Doirance 
Brown, S. M., . . Gaidenplain 
Brown, Charles C, . . Abilene 

♦Brown, C. H Navarre 

Brouhard, Harvey, . . . Mina 
Brubaker, Henry T., . . Chase 
*Brubaker, Moses E., Lyons 
Brubaker, Isaac S., . Mitchell 
*Brubaker, Jonathan, Mitchell 
Calvert, Jos. G., . Hutchinson 
Clapper, John, . . Greatbend 

*Click, Joel 

*CIine, J. F Oakvale 

Cober, Ephraini, . . . Sabetha 
Colbert, George, . . Mont Ida 

Ctipe, David B Dunlap 

*Criss^fiian, G. W., . . Walker 
*Crist, Isaac H., . . . Gardner 
*Crist, Henry F., . . Gardner 

Crist, D. A Quinter 

Daggett, Albion C, . . Rydal 

*Davis, Wni Morrill 

*Dickey, A. M., . . McPherson 
Downing, A. S., . . . Gridley 
I./v.J.G., . . . . Summerfield 

*! by, Knoch, Booth 

II kciiberry, J. W., . Altamont 
F. senbise, T. A., . . . Morrill 
Fisciibise, P. J., . . . Sabetha 
F ^■■iibise,John, . . . Morrill 
I.',' r, G. R., . . . Centropolis 
-I'".;ii()tt, George W., Nickerson 

r.iol, Samuel Gridley 

I'.'iiuley, H. E., .... Burroak 
*Fit7.water, L. W., . . Bashan 

Fi.ick, L. H Emporia 

*Fogle, Caleb, -Independence 
Forney, Benj., .... Abilene 
*Forrer, Samuel, . Herington 

Fox, E. S Walker 

Frantz, J.R., Beattie 

*Frantz, Edward, . McPherson 

Fry, Henry Atwood 

Fryfogle, Addison, . . Seward 
Funk, Jacob, Conway Springs 
*Garber, J. R., . Rockwell City 
Garber, C. S., . . . Fort Scott 
Garst, Isaac B. . . Appanoose 
Garst, George, ... Madison 
Gauby, Martin D., Washington 
Gauby, John M., . Washiiigton 

Giffin, E.J Garnett 

Gigax, Godfrey, .... Paola 
Haldeman, Samuel, . . Morrill 

Hantz, J. F., Abilene 

♦Haradcr, C, . Arkansas City 
*Harnish, Jacob, . . Dorrance 
*Harshbarger,J.P., McPherson 
Harshman, Samson 

Centropolis 

Harter, A. L., . . . McPherson 
*Heckman,C. T., 

Michigan Valley 

♦Henricks, L 

Henry, Samuel, . . . Bellevilic 
Hertzler. Ephraim 

Pleasantgrove 

Hertzler, Jonas, Pawnee Rock 

Hertzog,P. II Olathe 

*Hilkey, James E., Overbrook 
*Himes, W. B., . . ..Dorrance 



*Hodgden, Merrill, Galesburg 
*Hodgden, Sidney, Galesburg 
Hoff, E. B., . . . . McPherson 
*Hollinger,John, . . . Russell 
*Holsinger, Wm. . . Rosedale 
*Holsinger, C. S., . . Belleville 
Holsinger, D. R., . . Belleville 

*Hoover, J. J., 

*Hoover, Isaac L Alfred 

*Hooper, C. J., . . . . Sabetha 

*Hope, C, Herington 

Hultgren, O., . . . Marquette 
*Hutchison, A., . . McPherson 

Jarboe, J. W Lovewell 

*Johnson, Wm., 

. . 1533 Orange St., Wichita 
Katherman, S. B., . Lawrence 
*Keller, Michael, . Nickerson 
Kuns, Geo. D 

.... Box 120, McPherson 

Lantz, S. E Greenwood 

Lauver, Geo. M., . St. Francis 
Leaman, W. H.,- . . . Madison 
*Lerew, Lewis, .... Portis 
Lerew, Isaac S., . . . . Portis 
Lichtenwalter, A. B., . Neutral 
Longanecker, Daniel, . .Paola 
Lugenbeel, Wm., . . . Narka 

Mahorney, J. W Brooks 

*Manon, George, Gypsum City 

Martin, D. B Albert 

Masterson, E. K., McPherson 
Merkey, Jacob, . Washington 
Meyers, David, . New Cambria 

Meyers, J. D Ramona 

Miller, Isaac H., . . Abbyville 

*Miller, A. F., Booth 

Miller.W.H.. . . .Westphalia 

Miller, E. J., Olathe 

Miller, Andrew G., . . Walton 
Mishler, M. J., . . . . Monitor 

*IVIohler. J. S Morrill 

Moomaw, Amos, . Wilsonton 

*Myers, S. L Webber 

Myers, David R., New Cambria 

Myers, George, Wade 

*Neher,' Martin, . . . McCune 

Nelson, N. P Reece. 

Numer, J. H Ft. Scott 

Ogle, Alfred, Peabody 

Palmer, Harrison, . . Esbon 
*Pearsoll, A. L., . . . Dunlap 
Peck, Francis M., . . . Catalpa 
Perry, Jasper N., 

Conway Springs 

Peterson, Marinus . Lablanche 
Peterson, T. C, . . Herington 
Phillippi, Wm. R., . . . Hope 

Porter, Powell B Esbon 

Puterbaugh, A Ozawkie 

Puterbaugli. J. P., . Nickerson 

*Renncr, Eli, Burroak 

Robinson, T. A., . . Brazilton 

Rose, W. A Booth 

Royer, U. S., Newton 

Root, C. C, Ozawkie 

Root, Andrew, . . Centropolis 

*Root, John A Ozawkie 

•i=Sawyer,W. H. H., . . Morrill 
*Sell, Arthur, .... Grenola 
=^Sell, A. K., . . . . Fredonia 
*Sell, Wm, vB., . . . Fredonia 



Shamberger, J. H 

Medicine Lodge 

Shank, C. A Donegal 

Shank, Daniel, .... Russel 
Sharp, Geo. H., . . . .Atwood 

Shatto, A., Abilene 

*Sherfy, John, Michigan Valley 
Shideler, Henry, . . . Mineral 
*Shirk, Jacob B., . . Ramona 
Shively, John K., . . McCune 
Shoemaker, C. W., Appanoose 
Slifer, C. H., . . . McPherson 
Smith, L. S., 

. 1548 Pacific Ave., Atchison 
Smith; H.J.,. . . .Herington 

Smith, Daniel, Cuba 

Snavely, Ira C, . . McPherson 
Snyder, J. M., . . . McPherson 
Sprague, Byron, . . Lablanche 
Stauffer, Albert A., • Fredonia 
Stockmyer, Wm. . . Harding 

Stoner, D.W., Vesper 

Stouder, David W., . Emporia 
Strickler, Ellis, . . . Ramona 
Studebaker, J. E., . . Mont Ida 
Studebaker, Simon E., . . . 

Summerfield 

*Studebaker, George E., . . 

McPherson 

Studebaker, Jesse, . Mont Ida 
*Studebaker, G. W., . Fredonia 
*Talhelm, Humphrey, . . . 

Washington 

Thomas, J. A., Fred 

*Thompson, Stephen, Fredonia 
*Throne, G. M., Rockwell City 
Trapp, Nicholas, . . Altamont 

*Trostle, J.D Hope 

Troxel, Jacob, Conway Springs 
Ullery, Jacob, . . . Grenola 
Ullom, Homer, • . . , Friend 
Ulrich, Frederick, . . Fredonia 
*Vaninum, Daniel, McPherson 

Wagner, J. C, Portis 

Wallace, Carl Morrill 

Wampler, Chas., . . . Olathe 
*Watkins, Lafayette, Mont Ida 
-VVeddle, G. W., . . . Dunlap 

Weddle, R. M Dunlap 

*\Vertz, John B., . . . Quinter 
*\Vcybright, Wm., . . Alfred 
Wheckr, Elliot, . . . Gridley 
*Whitmcr,B.B., . . McLouth 
*Wl'.itmer, Peter. . . . Hamlin 
Wieand, Albert C, McPherson 
*Wine, Geo. S., . . Herington 
*Winey, Thomas, . Lawrence 
Wise, W. M., . . . Appanoose 

*VVise, Geo. E Olathe 

*Wise, John, Conway Springs 
*Witmore, Jacob, McPherson 
*Wolf, Leonard, . . Crawford 
*Wolfe, E. M., . . Monmouth 

Wyatt, R.. Santa Fe 

*Yoder, R. A., .... Sabetha 

^'()der, J. J Inman 

Young, Theodore B., . Wichita 

Kentucky. 

Cripe, D. E., Burdick 

Culp, A. S., . . Campbellsville 
Field, Louis Pilgrim 



Jones, Louis Cubage 

Scull, Martin James E., Rural 

Louisiana. 

Beery. Chas. O., . .Alexandria 

Coffman, J. M Roanoke 

Lewis, S. E Roanoke 

Miller, Lewis, .... Grayson 

Minix, Jos Lakeside 

Sutter, A. A Roanoke 

Maryland. 

Ausherman, Chas. F., Ellerton 
*Ausherman, D., Burkittsville 
*Barnhart, A. B., Hagerstown 
*Barton, S., . . . . Mapleville 
Beeghly, James W., . Accident 
*Beeghly, Jeremiah, . Accident 
*Bix]er, Uriah, . Westminster 
Bonsack,Chas.D., Westminster 
*Bricker. Jacob, . . Downsville 
Brown, Jer., . . New Windsor 
Brumbaugh, L. R., . . Denton 
*Brunner, Edward S., . . Pearl 
Burall, Jesse M., . New Market 
Buterbaugh, J. O., 

.... West Beaver Creek 
Buzzard, John M., . . Ellerton 
Castle, Noah P., . Brownsville 
Castle, C. W., . . Brownsville 
Coffman, T. Rodney, Fairplay 
Deanor, H C, . . Brownsville 
*Digman, T. B.,Mt. Lake Park 
Digman, S. P., Mt. Lake Park 
Ecker, Greenbury, Uniontown 

Ellis, C. C. Baltimore 

Englar,Wm. Philip, Uniontown 
Fahrney, Peter D., . Frederick 
Foltz, Samuel, . . Hagerstown 
*Franklin,W. H., Sams Creek 
Green, John C, . Lonaconing 
Harp, Geo. S., . . . . Ellerton 
Highbarger, O. S., Burkittsville 
Hochstettler, D., Engles Mills 
Hutchison, Jas. A., . Cordova 
Keller, Jacob S., . . Millstone 
*King, Joshua Y., . . . Griffin 
Kolb, T. J., Double Pipecreek 
Larkins, S. O., 

(Rowland Park), Baltimore 
*Leatherman, Geo., Harmony 
*Long, D Victor, . . Fairplay 
*Martin, N., . . . Hagerstown 
*Merrill, David M., Lonaconing 
*Miller, Sam'l, . Eagles Mills 

Myers, John Millstone 

Neibert, F. J., . Broadfording 
Otto, John E., . . Sharpsburg 
Price, Joseph, . . . Lineboro 

Pysell, Jacob McHenry 

♦Rairigh, Geo. S., . . Denton 
*Reichard, W. S., Hagerstown 
Renncr, F. C, . New Midway 
Robeson, Jesse J., Lonaconing 
Roop, Joel. . . . New Windsor 
Roop, Jesse, . . New Windsor 
Roop, Wm. E., . Westminster 
Rowland, A., . . Hagerstown 

*Rowland, John, Reid 

*Sappington, G. K., Johnsville 
*Sayler, D. R 

Double Pipecreek 



Brethren's Family Almanac, 



35 



Secrist, Caleb Cordova 

*Shoop, S. B Mapleville 

*Sines, W. T Oakland 

Smith, John, . . . Woodbury 
Stoner, David, . . . Johnsville 
*Stoner, Solomon, . Uniontown 
*Stoner, E. W., . Union Bridge 
Stouffer, Eph., . New Windsor 
Thompson, I. O., . . Kearney 
*Utz, S. H., . . . New Market 
Utz, John H., . Union Bridge 
Wampler, D. S., . Lonaconing 
Warner, Jos. (col.), . Cordova 
Weller, Jacob, . . . Millstone 

Weybright,J..S., 

Double Pipecreek 

Wingard, Jos. D., . . .Oxford 
Wolf, Daniel, .... Fairplay 
Wolf, D. S., .... CoUington 
*Yourtee, Eli, . . Brownsville 

Michigan. 

Albaugh, J. E Olney 

Baker, David, . Shepherdsville 

Baker, Levi Olney 

Chambers, J. W., . . . . Brice 

♦Chambers, D., Brice 

Flory, David Hastings 

Hufford, Isaac, .... Clarion 

Lair. John M., Custer 

Messner.Peter B., Lake Odessa 
Munson, A. A., . . . Lagrange 
Overholt, Jonas, . . . Dutton 
*Rairigh, Isaiah, . . Woodland 
*Rairigh, Isaac F., . Campbell 
Replogle, J. C, . . Buchanan 
Seas, Oliver, .... Nashville 
*Smith, S. M., . . . Campbell 

Smith, J. M Woodland 

Sprang, Godfry, White Pigeon 
Stone, Geo. E., . . Carson City 

*Stutsman,J. R 

Harbor Springs 

Thomas, David, . . . Bangor 
Tombaugh, Jacob, . . Rodney 
Towns, H., . Woodland Center 
Wallick, A. B., . Bloomingdale 
Weaver, William, . Glendora 
Weaver, Geo. E., . Buchanan 

Minnesota. 

*Broadwater, J., Greenleafton 
Burkholder, J., . Worthington 
*Eikenberry, W. H 

Worthington 

Fishbaugher, H., . . Granger 

*Hillery, C Worthington 

Kellar, D. H.. . . Worthington 

Lewis, Arthur Utica 

Oblinger. Samuel, . Waterville 
Richard, Wolford, . Waterville 
*Whetstone, D 

Minnesota City 

Wirt, John H., . . Lewistown 
*Wirt, Jacob, . . . Lewistown 

Missouri. 

Adkins, J. M Cabool 

*Baer, M. T Fristoe 

♦Barnhart, George, . Carthage 
Barnhart, J. E., . . Springfield 
Blackquell, John, East Prairie 



*Bowman, D Glensted 

Bray, W. T., Ladue 

Breshears, Burr E., . . Avery 
Brooks, J. W., . Warrensburg 
*Brubaker, Joseph, Littlerock 
Burghart, Peter, . Centreview 
Calvert, Noah H., . . . Jerico 
Campbell, James A., . Fristoe 
*Clark, Wm. H., . . Sheridan 
*Clemens, G. W., .... Stet 
*Cruea, Moses, . Farrenburg 
Crumpacker, A. H., . Rinehart 

*Culp, F., Leeton 

Deleplain, John, . Waynesville 

*Dove, F. W Cabool 

*Eby, Ira P Farrenburg 

Eby. S. M Plattsburg 

Ehlers, Henry, . . Littlerock 
*Ellenberger, Geo. W., Turney 

EUenberger, J. E Polo 

Etter, Henry Kidder 

Fike, Geo. D., Racine 

Garber, Joel, . . . Marmaros 
Gault, Samuel, .... Avilla 
Gilbert, J. Z., . . . Plattsburg 
Glick, Joel, .... Mound City 
Greenwood, J. W., . . .Cabool 
Harader, Lee, .... Pioneer 
Hardman, D. C, . . Hamilton 
*Harris, James P., . . Cabool 

*Harris, Isham, Ergo 

Harris, W. D., .... Cabool 

Harris, 1. L., Cabool 

Harvey, William, . . . Jasper 
Harvey, Amos, .... Jasper 
Hays, J. S., . . . . Cherrybox 
*HiIderbrand,J.D., Mound City 

*Hipes, Wm. C Kidder 

*Holderman, Chris., Carthage 
Holloway, James, . Centreview 
Holsopple, W. W., . . Fortuna 
*Hugendougler, J., Deepwater 
Hylton, B. B., . . . . Idumea 
*Hylton, Joseph B., . Idumea 
Hylton, Joiin W. B., . . Olathe 

Ihrig, J. B., Avery 

*John, E. E., Leeton 

*Jordan, J. L., Collins 

*Killingsworth, Abel, . Rainey 
Lapp, Christian, . Cherrybox 
Lehman, Josiah' . St. Martins 
*Lentz, G. W., .... Adrian 

Lesley, Eli, Nevada 

Lorah, Daniel, . . Farrenburg 

Lutz, G. H., . . . . St. Joseph 

Care of Mo. & Kan. Tel. Co 

Lutz, Orman H., . St. Joseph 

*Macy, Lewis, Fox 

Markey, E. A., . . Centerview 

Mason, J. T., Cabool 

Mason, John H., Stet 

*Mays, J. C, . . . . Cedarville 
McDonald, A. C, . . . Hardin 
Miller, I. N., . . . . Norborne 
Mohler, Jesse, . Warrensburg 
Mohler, John E., Warrensburg 

Mohler, D. L Leeton 

Mohler, Harvey H., . . Latour 
*Mohler, D. M., Warrensburg 
*Mohler, M. S., . . . . Leeton 
*Mohler*Levi, . Warrensburg 



*Mohler, J. M., . . . . Leeton 
Morris, Richard, . . . Triplet 

• Oren, Noah, Carthage 

Overfelt, Samuel, Gravelpoint 
Pricket, L. E., . . . . Pioneer 
Reece, Enos J., . . Grangeville 
*Rhodes, D. B., Rockingham 
Rodebaugh, A., . . . . Collins 

Root, Joseph A Avilla 

Royer, Jesse E HoUiday 

Rust, RaburnS., . . . .Avery 

Sadler, J Kidder 

Sell, Joseph B Cameron 

*Sell, Daniel D., . Plattsburg 
*Shamberger, Jesse, Sheridan 

Shank, J. B Kidder 

*Sharp, S. Z., . . Plattsburg 
*Shirky,Sam. B., Rockingham 
Shirkey, John H., Rockingham 
Simmons, Thos. J., . . Osceola 
Snoeberger, A. L., . Plattsburg 

Stair, M. E., Polo 

Steffen, Conrad, . . . Newark 

Stevens, S.M Cabool 

*Stump, Solomon, Waynesville 

Sturgis, John, Perrin 

Sunderland, Henry, Carthage 

Taylor, S. C Whitesville 

Teeter, D. W Jasper 

Tingley, H., ..... Jerico 
*Troxel, J. J., . Mountaingrove 
Tucker, John, . Hagers Grove 
Tyson, Abram S., . Mansfield 
*Wampler, Amos, Knobnoster 
Weaver, A. A., . . Mound City 
Whitestine, Wm., . . Modena 
*Wine, Geo. S., . . . . Bolivar 
*Wine, Samuel, .... Jasper 

Wine, Daniel D Nevada 

Witmore, Ira Adrian 

*Yearout, Chas. M., .... 
420 Franklin St., Warrensburg 

Nebraska. 

Bashor, Daniel . . Holmesville 
*Beckner, Perry, .... Filley 
*Berkeybile, Aaron, . Dubois 

Clark, B. O Pickrell 

Colebank, Wm. J., . . Russell 
Colebank, Marshall, . Farnam 
Couser, D. G., . ... Rokeby 

Dell, Isaac, Hamilton 

Fike, D. M., Carleton 

Flory, James, .... Shickley 
Forney, D. H., . . Davenport 
*Forney, S. M., . . . Kearney 
*Gish, J. W., . . . Holmesville 
Graham, Thomas, Holmesville 
*Heckler, Jesse Y., . Elmwood 
*Heiny, D. B., . . . . Shickley 
*Humbarger, John, . . Verdon 
*Ikenberry, John, . . . . Nora 
*Kelso, Jonathan, . . Carleton 
*Kindig, J. J., . . . ■ Juniata 
Lapp, Oliver J., . . Moorefield 

Lemon, J. D., Juniata 

Light, Caleb Decatur 

McCrea, James, . . . Berwyn 
McLellan, W. P., . . Litchfield 
Meek, Levi L., . . . . Octavia 
Mishler, George, . Cambridge 



Mohler, Wm., . . . Falls City 
*Moore, J. B., . . . . Octavia 

Nelson, N.B., Juniata 

Nickey, AmosJ Juniata 

*Nofziger, J. P., ... . Mascot 
Peck, Jacob C, . . . Falls City 
*Peters, Owen, . . Holmesville 
Reiff, J.B., . . . Holmesville 
Ross, Henry H., . . Hamilton 

Rothrock, E. S Carlisle 

Ryan, J. S AIvo 

Shaffer, Levi Beatrice 

*Shick, Urias. . . Holmesville 
Slingluff, John U., . . .Sidney 

Smith, Adam R Rokeby 

*Smith, C. B. ... Redcloud 

*Snavely, John L Alvo 

*Sollenberger, Aaron D., . . 

Pickrell 

Thomas, Isaac, Alvo 

Titus, Albert, Carlisle 

*VanDyke, Archibald, .... 

24 Bell St., Beatrice 

Wagoner, Noah B., . Redcloud 

Westrick, O., Dubois 

Wine, John M., .... Octavia 

Wright, J. C Miller 

*Yoder, Stephen, Holmesville 
Young, J. E Beatrice 

New Jersey. 

*Hoppock, J. D., Sergeantsville 
Hyde, Robinson, . Sandbrook 
*Moore, C. W., . . Sandbrook 
Reiff, J. C, . . Sergeantsville 

North Carolina. 

Bradshaw, John, 

Brummetts Creek 

Bradley, E. J., Saluda 

Branscom, Geo. A.,Melvin Hill 

Faw, C. R., Salem 

Foss, Lewis Lagrange 

Griffeth, J. M 

Brummetts Creek 

Handy, Wm. H Furches 

Kilpatrick, J. W., . . Fishtop 
Laughrun, A. M., . . . Relief 
Laughrun, Marion, . . Relief 
Miller, Henderson, . . Comet 
Miller, Geo. W., .... Clifton 
Miller, Jonathan, . . . Comet 
Owens, Martin G., . . Transon 
Peterson, E., . Hollow Poplar 
Peterson, Solomon, . . Relief 
Peterson, John H., . . . Relief 

Frather, M., Creston 

Prather, H. M Creston 

Reed, A. J Scottville 

Reed, Wm. A., . . . Scottville 
Robinson, J. F., . . . . Salem 
Sheets, E. M., .... Lansing 
Sheets, Adam, .... Lansing 

Sheets, Henry Chiton 

Sheets, Andrew, Gray 

Sheets, Jesse, .... Lansing 
Woodie, John C, . . Scottville 
Woody, John C, . . . Transon 

North Dakota. 

Bare, John, .... Carrington 
Beagle, Howard J., , Kenmare 



■I 

i 



36 



Brethren s Family Almaiiac, 



Beagle, John P., . . Kenmare 

Boyd, C. F Cando 

Brunton. Walter York 

Bueghly, Martin, .... Cando 

Deardorff, Isaac Cando 

Demuth, Jos. H York 

Eisenhour, M. A., 

Grand Harbor 

Eversole, Silas N., Devils Lake 
*Harader, 1. L., . . Carrington 
♦Hartsough, J., Grand Harbor 
Hawbaker, A. W., . Kenmare 
*Holder, Joseph, . . . Cando 

Hufford, D. A Cando 

McCann, Wm. J., . Carrington 

McClane, John Knox 

Miller. L.E Cando 

*Neher, Andrew Cando 

*Niccum, David H., Carrington 
Oaks, Lewis, . New Rockford 
Olsen, John, . . . Devils Lake 
Partch, A. H., . . Carrington 

Peters, Amos, Cando 

Peters, Jesse, Cando 

Prough, Daniel York 

*Seibert, J. C Cando 

♦Stambaugh, G. W., Carrington 

Stong, G. W Cando 

Strycker, Geo., . . . Mayville 

Swihart, Geo Mayville 

*Thomas, J. L Cando 

*Weaver. J. A Bowbells 

Woodard, A. B Cando 

Ohio. 

Arnold, Perry A., . Metamora 
Arnold, Whitmore, . Somerset 
Bagwell, E. B., . . . . Alpha 
Baker, H. M., . West Newton 

Baker, Henry Baker 

Bame, Chas. A., Williamstown 

Barnhart, W. W Dayton 

Barwick, H. M., W. Alexandria 

Beagle, Eli, Ada 

Bean. Wm. M Degraff 

Beeghly, John W., - . Dayton 
Beelman, Adam, . . . Chicago 

♦Berkeybile, D Delta 

Berkeybile, S. P., . . . . Delta 
Blocher, S. W., . . . Hillgrove 
Boggs, William, . . Covington 
*Bookwalter, L. A., Trotwood 
*Bosserman. Eleazar. . . . 

..:.... Mt. Blanchard 
*Bowman, J. J., New Lebanon 
♦Bright, J. C, . New Lebanon 

♦Brown, John, Bryan 

Brubaker, A., Gratis 

Brubaker, David, Loudonville 
Brubaker, J. F.,W. Alexandria 
♦Brumbaugh, Jesse K., Union 
♦Brumbaugh, John H., Clayton 
♦Brumbaugh, A., . . Bradford 
Brumbaugh, Jacob, . Pitsburg 

Burger, S. J Baltic 

Byerly, David, Lima 

Byers, David, Canton 

♦Calvert, W. Q Mayhill 

♦Calvert, Wm Bell 

Carper, George 

. . East Akron Sta., Akron 
♦Christian, J. H., . Gettysburg 



Clapper, Daniel, . . Louisville 
Coate, David Celina 

*Coppock, Samuel, 

Tippecanoe City 

Coppock, Jacob. 

Tippecanoe City 

Cordier. F. P Celina 

♦Cotterman. Francis, Dayton 
♦Coy. Aaron, .... Dayton 
Crowell. Devolt, . . Bradford 

Danford. E. M Sidney 

Deary. James E., . . . Alvada 
Dessenberg, Wm., . . Ashland 

Detrick, J. B Earley 

♦Dickey, L. H.. . . . Alvada 
Dolby, Wiley. . . Jeffersonville 

Driver. Jacob Lima 

Driver. S. L. Lima 

♦Driver. Samuel, .... Lima 

Eby, Josiah Dayton 

Eby, Henry H., . . . Eldorado 

England, W. F Ashland 

Erbaugh, G. W.. New Lebanon 
Feightner. Levi, .... Amoy 
Filbrun, David S., . . Brandt 

Flory, Henry Defiance 

Flory, John Jewell 

♦Frantz, J. L., . . . . Degraff 
Frantz, Isaac, . . Pleasanthill 
Frantz, Henry, .... Forgy 
Freed, Peter, . . . New Stark 
Fuller, Harry, . . . Oakwood 
Garber, Simon, . . . Fremont 
♦Garber, Jacob, . . Trotwood 

Garst,J. O Dayton 

♦Garver, D. M., . Farmersville 
Garver, Samuel. . . Chatham 
Graham, J. H., . . Downington 
♦Groff, Joseph, . . Covington 
♦Groff, Nathan, . . North Star 
Grossnickle, S. P., . Edenton 
♦Gump, H.. . Tippecanoe City 
Gump, S. S., Tippecanoe City 
Guthrie, W. R., . . . Herring 
Guthrie. J. L., . . . . Herring 
Hahn. M. W.. 

North Georgetown 

Harman. Wm., . . Tontogany 

Harp, James. Hedges 

Harrold. Albert, . Columbiana 
Heestand, A. L, . . Smithville 
Heistand, Jacob, . . . Hoaglin 

Heifer, P Granger 

Helm, C. A Nova 

♦Hendrickson, D. C, . . . . 

West Milton 

Hershey. E.. . . . Gettysburg 
Hochstettler, Josiah. Mt. Hope 
Hoke. Jonas, .... Leetonia 
♦Holler, George, . . . Dayton 
HoUinger, Moses, . . . Baker 
Hollinger, Eli, . . Bloomcenter 
Holmes. Eli, .... Smithville 
Honeyman, B. F., . . . Center 
Hoover, Jonathan, . . . Oran 
Hoover, Cyrus, . Weilersville 
Hoover, Tobias, . . Chatham 
Hoover, Joseph J., . Barryville 

Hoover, W. L T Dayton 

Horn, Elijah, .... Roseville 
Horning. Sam'l, New Lebanon 
♦Horning, Jonas, . . JohnsvUle 



♦Hyer, Enoch, . West Carleton 

Irvin, David M Orrville 

♦Jones, Henry , . West Milton 
Kahler, J. F,, Box 127, Canton 
♦Katherman, J., . Gettysburg 

♦Keiser, J.W Primrose 

Keller, Henry, . North Liberty 

Keller, Henry Osceola 

Kessler, Jos., . Pleasant Home 
Killian, John W., . . Antwerp 

Kimmel,J.T Hartville 

♦Kinsey, Jesse, . . . .Clayton 
Kinsley, Chas., . . . Hartville 

♦Kintner, Jacob Moats 

Kintner, W. L. . Mark Center 
♦Klepinger, William, . Dayton 

Koch, D. P., Karle 

Kollar, G.V 

New Philadelphia 

Kollar, P., . New Philadelphia 

Krabill, John P Prairie 

♦Krabill, C Farmer 

*Kreider,Tobias,Painter Creek 
Kurtz, J. H., ..'... Poland 
Kurtz, John., .... Hartville 
Landis, Joseph, . . . Gordon 
Landis, Bartley. . Hollowtown 
♦Leatherman, D.,New Carlisle 
Leckrone, Quincy, . Glenford 
Light, Joseph B., Greenspring 
Longanecker, J., 

West Manchester 

Longanecker, H. C, .... 

.... 729 South St., Sidney 
Longanecker, Noah, Hartville 
Loomis, Ed 

New Philadelphia 

♦Loose, S. M Fremont 

Lytle, David, .... Deshler 

Mahler, Geo Pioneer 

Mallow, W. D., .... Austin 

Mark, John, ....... Edon 

Martin, J. F., . . . . Bradford 

♦May, James, (col.), Circleville 
May, Charles E., (col.), . . 

Circleville 

♦McKimmey, Perry, Metamora 
McKimmey, Wm., . Metamora 
McMullen, J., . . . Mansfield 

Miller, Daniel Mendon 

♦Miller. Abednego. . . Degraff 
Miller. Sam'l, West Alexandria 

Miller, L B Gettysburg 

Mishler.J. G Suffield 

Mohler. George. .... Boyd 
Moherman, Tully S., Ashland 

Mote, Harvey. Vine 

Muntis, Samuel, . Mt. Vernon 

Murray, Wm. A Polk 

Murray, James. . . Smithville 
Ockerman, J. E., . . Highland 

Ockerman. A Highland 

♦Oliver, David H., . Trotwood 
Orr, Samuel, . . . Brownsville 

Petry. Benj. F Gratis 

Petry. Stephen. . . . Glenkarn 
Pittenger, J. M., . Pleasanthill 
Pittenger, John, . . . Spencer 
Plauger, A. J., . . . . Hoaglin 
♦Pringle, Joseph, . . Edenton 
♦Prowant, Daniel, . . Dupont 



♦Prowant, John, . . . Dupont 
Quinn, Wm. H., 

117 4th St., Canton 

Reed, Charley, . . . Wauseon 

Reese. J. W Jerry City 

Rittenhouse, E. M., . Primrose 

Robison, Joseph Carey 

Rodecker, Thomas, . Mendon 

Roop, Israel Attica 

♦Rosenberger, I. J., Covington 
Rosenberger, A. S., Covington 
Rosenberger. E. H., McComb 

Royer, S. D Bradford 

Sandy, Jacob D., Donnellsville 

Sellers, G. W., Bryan 

Setty, Sanford, Sinking Spring 

Shank, E Dayton 

Sharp, B. F Cosmos 

♦Shellaberger, John, Rockford 

Shively, Aaron Bayard 

♦Sholty, B. F Pioneer 

Shong, David, . . . Sherwood 
Shroyer, Reuben, . . Otterbein 

Shutt, H. M., Baltic 

♦Smith, John, . . . Trotwood 

Snell, Samuel, Union 

Snider, G. A Harrod 

Snyder, David. . . . Ashland 
Snyder. B. F.. . Bellefontaine 
Sollenberger, D. P.. . Fidelity 
♦Spacht.J. R., . . New Stark 
Sprankel, Samuel, . Massillon 
♦Stephens, Rezin 

West Manchester 

Stroup, Eli, . . . Homeworth 

Stuckey. Simon B Paris 

Studebaker. Isaac S.. Casstown 
Stump, George C, . . . Baker 
♦Stutsman. Jesse, . . Pitsburg 
Stutsman, D. C 

. . 1018 N. Main St., Dayton 
Teeter. W. C 

... 17 Horace St., Dayton 
Thomas. D. D.. Williamstown 
Thomas. S. B., . . . . Carey 

Titler, Geo Dupont 

Tyson. Geo., . West Millgrove 
♦Walker, S. A.. . . Bloomville 
Wampler, D. J., . Taylorsburg 
Weidman. Silas, . . . Burbank 

Weimer. F. B Sterling 

Weirich, Jacob. . . Osnaburg 

West. Landon Lanier 

Whisler. Sam'l. North Liberty 
Wieand. T. C, . Madisonburg 

Wilkins, C. L Harrod 

Williams, Oliver, . . . Hedges 
♦Wine, D. D., . . . Covington 

Wise, David Watson 

♦Witmore, J. C, . . . Longley 
Woods, Charles M., . Spencer 
Workman. Wm.. . Loudonville 
Workman. J. T., . . . Jelloway 
Workman. James, . . . Rolla 
Workman, C. J., Buckeye City 
Workman, S. J., . Ankenytown 
Workman, A. S., . Loudonville 
Worst, David, . . . Lattasburg 
Yoder, John, Jr., . Millersburg 
♦Young, David, . . Mogadore 
Young, H.S New Berlin 



^1 



Brethren s Family Almaiuic. 



37 



Oklahoma. 

*AppIeman, Jacob, . Clarkson 
*Austin, A. W., . . . Gushing 

Betts, Jacob Chandler 

Betts, I. F Ingram 

♦ Booze, H., . . . Round Grove 
Bosserman, Wm. P,, Karoma 
Brouse, W. P., . . . . Ingram 
*Brubaker, J. O., ." . . Acton 

Brubaker, W. R Acton 

Brubaker, J. H., , . . . Acton 
Brubaker, N. F., . . Concord 

Carter, J., Chandler 

Cloyd, -— , Cherokee 

*Edgecomb, Samuel, . Phunb 
Fillmore, A. G., . . . Cashing 

Forney, Isaac Wellston 

Gentry, Geo. T., Independence 

Glick, Joseph Hoyle 

Gordon, Daniel, Round Grove 
Gorham, A. L., . . . Clarkson 
*Gripe, N. S., . . . . Clarkson 
Henricks, Zaccheus, . . Hoyle 

Holler, John, Valley 

Landis, F. B Acton 

Landis, G, W., Acton 

Masterson, Jos. S., . Tonkawa 

Murray, Jacob Lacy 

Neher, J. C, Stroud 

Neher, Ananias, . . . Clarkson 
Redmon, S. S., . . Davenport 

Sanders, A. W., Perry 

Smith, Wm Hoyle 

Smith, Emmanuel J., . . Lynn 
Stouder, Jas. A., . . Chandler 
Troxel, Henry, .... Burnett 

Oregon. 

Banr, Jacob, .... Damascus 
Baltimore, Aaron, . . Tallman 
Barklow, Thomas, Myrtlepoint 
Barklow, Chas. H., Myrtlepoint 
*Bashor, M. M. . . . Macleay 
*Bonewitz, John, . . . Norvi^ay 
*Brower, David, .... Talent 

Brower, D. M Ashland 

Carl, Geo. C, . . Myrtlepoint 
Decker, Sam'l E., Myrtlepoint 

Early, J. B., Salem 

Ebersole, J. F., Salem 

*Gwinn, J. N., .... Ashland 

Hoxie, G. W WiUiams 

Hulse, F. M., . . . . Ashland 

Leedy, Danie) Albany 

*Moomaw, J. T., . Eaglepoint 

Nininger, C. E Ashland 

Royer, Josiah A., . . . Isabel 

Shuck, S. A., Ashland 

VanDyke, S. P Norway 

■*Workman, Philip, . . Mabel 

Pennsylvania. 

Aldinger, Jacob, York 

Allison, David 

Lees Crossroads 

Anthony, Wm Clayhill 

Anthony, F. D Elderton 

Auker, Joseph, McAlisterville 

Aultland, Daniel York 

Babylon, E.. . . Menges Mills 
*Baker, D. M., . Waynesboro 



Baker, J. S Everett 

Baker Chas. L., . East Berlin 

Baker, David H., Abbottstown 

*Barnthouse, Jasper, .... 
Markleysburg 

*Barto, Isaac, Mechanicsburg 
*Bashor, And., . Oakland Mills 
Beasor, John R., . . Barbara 
Baugher, Geo. M., . Brodbecks 
*Baugher, Aaron, . . Codorus 
Beam, Joseph, .... Ligonier 
Beaver, S. S., . McAlisterville 
*Beaver, John L., . Mifflinburg 
Beavei-, Adam, . . . Hartleton 
Beaver, Isaiah, Lochiel Union 
*Becker, G. S., ... Deodate 
Beeghly, S. A., . . . Coalport 
*Beelman, Henry, . Dillsburg 

*Beer, J. H., Rockton 

*Bennett, John, . . . Artemas 
*Berkey, Joseph, . . Hillsboro 
*Berkley, Josiah, .... Glade 
Berkley, Albert,. .Johnstown 
Blough, J. W., . . Hooversville 
Blough, P. J., . . Hooversville 
Blough, J. M., . Stantons Mill 
*Blough, E. J., . Stantons Mill 
Blough, S. S., . . . Johnstown 
Bomberger, Cyrus, . Lebanon 

Bond, Wm White 

Book, Isaac Warble 

*Book, Edmund Blain 

Booz, Jacob, . . . Salfordville 

Bottorff, Jerry, Odell 

Bowser, John, . . ; Tatesville 

*Brallier, D. S 

2137th St., Altoona 

Braucher, Urias D., . Somerset 
Brilhart, D., .... Loganville 
Brindle, Cyrus, . . Huntsdale 
Brough, John, . . East Berlin 
*Brown, Peter, . . East Berlin 
Brown, Jacob K., . Woodbury 
Brubaker, Christian, Neffsville 
Brubaker, W. U., . . Rockton 
Brumbaugh, M. G., .... 

Huntingdon 

*Brumbaugh, J. B 

Huntingdon 

*Brumbaugh, H. B., .... 

Huntingdon 

Brumbaugh, JoRn H., Barbara 
Brumbaugh, Geo., . . Grafton 
Brumbaugh, John, . . Grafton 
Brumbaugh, James D,, . . . 

Martinsburg^ 

Brumbaugh, G. B 

James Creek 

Brumbaugh, J. B., Clovercreek 

*Brumbaugh, G. W 

Clovercreek 

*Bucher, G., . Mechanic Grove 
*Bucher, Christian, 

Schaefferstown 

*Buck, C. L., New Enterprise 
Burget, A. B., . . Clovercreek 
Burkhart, Jos.S., . Johnstown 

*Cassel, F. P Lansdale 

Cassel, Isaac, Fairview Village 
Charles, Warren, . . Grampian 
Christner, A. D., Mt. Pleasant 
Christner, N. B 

Milford Station 



Christner, Amos, . . Gebhart 
Claar, Michael, . . Claysburg 

Claar, J. C, Queen 

Claar, Abram J Queen 

Clapper, D. S Everett 

Clark, E. F 

. . 134 W. Long St., Dubois 

Cleaver, Geo., . . Curvvensville 
Cline. Joseph W., 26th St. & 

. Lehigh Ave., Philadelphia 
Connor, Jacob, . Graters Ford 
Cook, Hezekiah, . . Dillsburg 

Cover. Samuel C 

. 4747 Liberty St., Pittsburg 
Cox, Samuel M., . . . . Kipple 
Crissman,John, . . . Hortons 

Crouthamel, Hillery 

Line Lexington 

Darr, JohnJ. Gideon 

*Davis, J. A., Tub 

Deardorff, JohnD. W 

Gettysburg 

Debolt, Alpheus, . Masontown 
Dell, Jacob, .... Duquesne 
*Detweiler, D. T., Salemville 

Dietz, J.F Johnstown 

Dively, Fred. C, . . Claysburg 
Dorer, Solomon, . . Johnstown 
Eby, Isaac, . New Germantown 
*Eby, Benjamin Z., . Manheim 
Eby, Josiah, New Germantown 
Ecker, D. R., . Walnut Bottom 
Eicher, John K., . Kecksburg 
Eisenberg, J. Y., East Coventry 
Eshelman, Daniel M., . Florin 
*Etter, Henry, . . . Beautiful 
*Etter, David, . . Hanoverdale 
Fahnestock, Nathan, Manheim 
Falkenstein, George N., . . 

6611 Germantown Ave., Phila 
Faust, Jeremiah, . Jones Mills 

Ferguson, I. B., Bills 

Flohr, J. R., . . Fountaindale 
Fluck, J. B., . . . . Loysburg 

*Fogelsanger, J. R 

Middle Spring 

Forney, Hilton G., 

East Petersburg 

Foust, David A., . Williamson 

Francis, Jay G., Oaks 

Fretz, William, . . . Hatfield 
Fyock, Abram, . . Johnstown 
Fyock, J. W., . Purchase Line 

Garland, John C '. . 

Pleasantridge 

Garner, J. D., .... Beautiful 

Garver, John E., Cora 

*Gaunt, W. A Elklick 

Gibble, Cyrus R., Brunnergville 
Gibble, Hiram, . . . Manheim 
Ginrich, A. B., . , . . Fontana 
*Gnagey, Joel, . . Meyersdale 
*Gotwalls, Jacob Z., . . Oaks 
*Gochenour, E., . . Bigmount 
*Grater, A. L., . . Royersford 

*Graybill, John, 

Graybill, Israel, Penn 

Graybill, Reuben, . . Manheim 
*Gray, S. S., . . . Shirleysburg 
Groff, Hershey, . . . Bareville 
*Hackman, Jacob, . . Oregon 
Haines, Amos H., Huntingdon 
*Hanawalt, George, . Boucher 



Hanawalt, W. C, . . ^ . . . 

Hollidaysburg 

Harden, Thomas, . Hyndman 
Harlacher. J. A., . East Berlin 
Harshbarger, John, Jolmstown 
Harrison, John C, . . . Vinco 
Hege, George, . . Williamson 

Heiple, Theo Boucher 

Heisy, Martin, . . . Cornwall 
*Herr, John, . . . Myerstown 
Herr, Tobias, . . . Millersville 
Hershberger, J. S,, . . Everett 
Hershberger Solomon, . . . 

Valley Mill 

*Hertzler, John Bethel 

Hertzler, S. H., Elizabethtown 
*Hetrick, J. P., East Coventry 
Hetrick. David A., Kellersburg 
*Hildebrand, D., Conemaugh 
Hochstettler,H. P., . Rummel 
Hostetler, E. K., . Pocohontas 
Hohf, D. B., . Smiths Station 
Holderman, M., . . Pinegrove 
Hollinger, A. K., Shippensburg 
*Hollinger, Jacob, Greenspring 
Hollinger, Henry, . . Fontana 
Hollinger, A. M., . Mooredale 

*PIolsinger, J. L., 

Bakers Summit 

Holsinger, L. F., . . Waterside 
Holsopple, Ira C, . . Indiar:a 
*Holsopple, Jacob, . Geistow.' 
*Holsopple, Joseph, . Indiana 
Holsopple, F. F., . Parkerford 

Hoover, Silas Bills 

Hoover, O. P., . . Huntingdon 
*Horner, D. D., . . Jones Mills 
Hosfeld, C. F., . Shippensburg 
Hottenstein, Amos, .... 

East Petersburg 

Howe, W. M., 

. . 720 Kohn St., Norristown 

Hull, Abraham, Hall 

Hull, R. T., . . . . Bakersville 

*Huttle, Benj Passer 

Imler, T. F. 

307 W. Lemon St., Lancaster 
Iset, John, . . . Graters Ford 
Johnson, Isaiah C, Meyersdale 
Just, Cyrus A., . . Rockwood 
Kauffman, S., . Oakland Mills 

Keller, I. B., Lincoln 

Kimmel, Lewis, . . . Elderton 
Kittinger, B. F., . . . Ambler 
Kline, Daniel R., . . . Bethel 
Knavel, Peter, . . Scalp LeveJ 
Knisely, C. S., . . Valley Mill 
Knisley, Geo., . . . Tatesville 
*Koontz, Jacob, . . Loysburg 
*Koontz, Wm., . Shadygrove 
Kopenhaver, Wm., Mt. Carmel 
*Kulp, Isaac, . . Graters Ford 
Kutz, Daniel, . De Turksville 
Lake, Daniel B., Harrisonville 
*Landis, Daniel, Bowmansdale 
Landis, Elias, .... Richfield 
*Lane, James R., Shirleysburg 
Leatherman, E. K., . Fairfield 
Lefever, Elias B., . . Ephrata 

Lehman, James P., 

538 W. Philadelphia St., York 
Lehman, Hiram, . . Geistown 
*Lehner, John, Up^on 



38 



Brethren's Family Alina7iac. 



Lehmer, G. G., Mechanicsburg 

*Light, H. E., . . Mountville 

*Lint, C. G., . . . Meyersdale 

Long, Walter S., . . . Tyrone 

Long, J. A., 

. . . 800 \V. Locust St., York 

Long, Orville V., Abbottstown 

♦Longanccker, J. H., Palmyra 

Maddock, D., Roaring Spring 

*Maddocks, T. B., Clovercreck 

Maderia, Chas.. . Milton Grove 

Mahle, Edward, . . . Fryburg 

Maust, S. P., . . . Meyersdale 

*Mellott, Absalom, . . . Gem 

Meyers, J. T Oaks 

Meyers, Samuel, . • . Codorus 

*MilIer, Daniel, . Mercersburg 

Miller, Howard, . . Lewisburg 

Miller, B. W Advance 

Miller, S. G., Bolivar 

M iller, George H Point 

♦Miller, John B., . New Paris 

Miller, Alfred Carroll 

Miller, P. U., . . . Brotherton 

Miller, John A Oakville 

Miller, E. S., . . . . Blackrock 

Miller, J. Kurtz, . . Kauffman 

Miller, J. B Woodbury 

*Mohler, John M., Harrisburg 

Mohler, Levi S., . . Dillsburg 

*Mummert, M., Menges Mills 

Murray, Fred., . . Champion 

Murphy, M. L., . McVeytown' 

*Musselnian, H., . Scalp Level 

Musser, Samuel, . McVeytown 

Myer, JohnW., . . Lancaster 

Myers, J. Allen, . McVeytown 

Myers, S. B Graydon 

Myers, R. T., . . McVeytown 

Myers, J. W., . Fredericksburg 

Myers, C. E., Tarrs 

Myers, H. S., . . . Pennsville 

Myers, Ananias, . . Johnstown 

Myers, Jacob M., . . Graydon 

*Myers, John Lincoln 

Myers. T. T., 

2414 N. 17th St., Philadelphia 
Myers, Andrew, 

325 W. Philadelphia St., York 
*Myers, Christian, . Mt. Union 
*Myers, G. S., New Enterprise 
Myers, S. F., . . . . . Altoona 
Myers, Joseph, . Mt. Pleasant 
♦Ness, Christian, . . Graydon 
♦Newcomer, J. S., . Mountville 
Nissly, Jacob, . . . .Richland 
Oberholtzer, W. H.,Myerstown 
Oellig, C. R., . . Waynesboro 
Patterson, Geo., . Berwinsdale 
♦Peck, J. W., . . Meyersdale 

♦Peck, L. A Savage 

Pfautz, J.K., . . Farmersville 
♦Pfoutz, A., . . Crosskill Mills 

♦Pfoutz, C. L Knoxlyn 

♦Pollard, R. T., . . . . Garrett 
Price, J. M., . . . Harleysville 
Price, J. II., . . Richlandtown 
♦Price, Henry A., Harleysville 
Pullen. Wrn. H., . Parkerford 
Ream. JameS F., . . Geistown 
Rei).M-. Jno. G., . . Centerport 
Reed, Samuel Progress 



♦Reidenbach, R. S., Hinkleton 
♦Replogle, J. B., . . Woodbury 
Replogle, H. S., . . Waterside 
Richard, Jacob H., . Maitland 
Riddlesberger, Isaac, . Quincy 

Ritchey, W. S Foreman 

Ritchey, Saml., . Yellowcreek 

Ritter. H. H Kregar 

Rodgers, Levi Ryot 

Royer, Henry D., . . Lincoln 
Royer, Abram H., . Talmage 
Royer, Abram, . . . Earlville 
Rupert, S. G., . . . Lewistown 
*Rush, JohnS., . . Tatesville 
Ruthrauff, J. B., . Waynesboro 
Schlosser, John, . . Schoeneck 
*Sieber, Sol., . Thompsontown 
*Sell, James A., . McKee Gap 

Sell, Brice Newry 

Sell, David, Newry 

Shaffer, D. D., . . Scalp Level 
Shaffer, Joseph, . Hooversville 
Shellenberger, J. B., .... 
Bannerville 

Shively, G. W Kossuth 

Shively, Green, . Whitesprings 
Shober, Samuel U., . Somerset 
Shope, Adam J., . Harrisburg 

Shope. David F Saltillo 

Showalter, Simon, . Richfield 
*Shrock, W. G., . . Brotherton 
Shroyer, Daniel, , . . Carroll 
Simmons. Alonzo L., . Everett 
*Smith, David, Union Deposit 
Smith, Jacob O., . . . . Swales 
*Snider, Jacob, . W^aynesboro 
*Snowberger, J. S 

Williamsburg 

Snader, David, Akron 

Sonon, H. S., East Petersburg 
*Spanogle, A, H., . Lewistown 

Speicher, Jacob, Bills 

*Spi£her, John W., . Hillsdale 

Spicher, M. H -Ord 

Stahl,H. A., Glade 

*Stayer, D. H Tatesville 

Stayer, J. C, . . . Woodbury 
Stayer, J. R., . Roaring Spring 
*Stamy, J. F., Lees Crossroads 
Steinberger, Albert, Lewistown 

Stoner, Levi Mammoth 

Stouffcr, S. M., . Greenspring 

Strawser, Geo Oriental 

Strickler, D. H., . . Vicksburg 
♦Stuckey, L. T„ 

New Enterprise 

*Summy, Abraham, Kecksburg * 

Swab, John Valley 

Swigart, M. C, . McVeytown 
♦Swigart, S. J., . . Lewistown 
♦Swigart, W. J., . Huntingdon 
Swigart, G. H., . .McVeytown 
Swigart, J. C, . Strodes Mills 
Taylor, L W., . . Vogansville 
Taylor, S. W., . Springgrove 
Thomas, Michael, . Somerfield 
Thomas, Wm., Gibbons Glade 
Trimmer, Peter, . . Mulberry 
Umbel, Samuel, Markleysburg 
Vanhorn. Daniel M., Foreman 
Wakefield. R. W.,Shirleysburg 
Wakefield, R. M., . . Rockhill 



Walker, Daniel H Lull 

Walker, Ira D.S.. .... Lull 

Wegley, J. W., . . . Somerset 
Weily, Wm., , . Franklintown 
Weller,M.J., . . Markleysburg 
♦Wenger, Israel, . . . Lincoln 
Wenger, Ed., . Fredericksburg 
♦Weyand, Michael, . . . Lull 
Widdowson, James, Dixonville 
Wiley, Wm., . . . . Dillsburg 

♦Wilt, J. W Altoona 

Winand, Geo., . York Springs 
Wineman, D. B 

Upper Strasburg 

Winey, C. G East Salem 

Winger, David, . . . Claylick 
Witmer, Samuel Z., . . . . 

Elizabethtown 

Witmer, John H., Hanoverdale 

Wood, C. A Haynie 

Ziegler, D. P., . . . Mt. /Etna 
Ziegler, Jesse C, . Royersford 
Zimmerman, J. S., Hooversville 
Zimmerman, S.. . Davidsville 
Zuck, D. M., . . Mercersburg 
♦Zug, S. R., . . Elizabethtown 
Zug, H. S., . . Mastersonville 

South Carolina. 

Jones, S. P Brooklyn 

South Dakota. 

♦Cook, W. G., . . Bijou Hills 
Horning, W. W., . . Frederick 

Horning, S. H Frederick 

Mansfield, Morgan, . Frederick 

Tennessee. 

Allen, H. C Snowflake 

Anderson, George, . Snowfiake 
Baker, David, South Wautauga 

Bantz, C. M Lankford 

Bashor, John, . . Bashors Mill 
Bashor, Conrad, . Bashors Mill 
Bowman, Joseph . . Jonesboro 
Bowman, Daniel F., . . . . 

Johnson City 

Bowman, Samuel, . Flourville 
Bowman, John P., . Jonesboro 
Brown, Wm. F., . Bashors Mill 
Brubaker, John, . . Morelock 

Clark, Jesse, Telford 

Clark, Wm., . . Johnson City 
Conley, Lafayette, . Jonesboro 

Correll, P. M Morelock 

Davis, Chas., . Lawrenceburg 

Davis. D. C Trade 

Derrick. Marvel, . . Snowfiake 
Diehl, C. H., .... Jonesboro 
Duncan, A. H., . McMinnville 

Garber, S. H Leesburg 

Garst, J.H Blountville 

Garst, Noah N., . . Blouiitville 
Gilbert, Greenberg, . . . ■. . 

New Canton 

Gray, E. D Limestone 

Hawke, Martin R., . Childress 
Hilbert, John B., . . Leesburg 
Hinkle, James, . Johnson City 
Hodge. Josiah, . . Piney Flats 
Isenburg, W. D., . Gillenwater 
Klepper. Peter. . . . Alumwell 
Klepper, D. B., . Cloyds Creek 



Larimere, John, . Whites Store 
Lehman, J. B., . . . Crowson 
Lilly, Thomas, . Johnson City 
Lilly, Andrew J., . . . Lawson 

Lovegrove, J. W Telford 

McKeehan, E. K., . Jonesboro 

Miller, Peter Jonesboro 

Molsbee, J. O., . . Gillenwater 
Murray, Jacob A., . . . . Pate 
Murray, John, . , Bean Station 

Nead, M Leesburg 

Oren, A. W Lankford 

Pence, J. B., . . . . Limestone 
Pence, George F., . Limestone 
Reed, Peter D., . . Limestone 
Sherfy, N. B., . . . Blountville 
Sherfy, W. A., . . Morningstar 
Sizemore, Jos. L, . . War Gap 
Smith, W. S., . . Edens Ridge 
Vines, Andrew J., . Jonesboro 

WMlliford, Wm Kansas 

Wine, Joseph, . . .Blountville 
Wine, Jacob Oakgrove 

Texas. 

♦Eby, Levi H Barstow 

♦Elliott, J. M Houston 

Gish, R. G Deer Park 

Kidwell, E. M Decatur 

♦Miller, J. A ^ Mantel 

♦Molsbee, Abraham, . Nocona 

♦Neher, J. F Saginaw 

Peters, Morton, .... Manvel 

Stump, John, Miami 

♦Tennison, K. G., W^eatherford 

Utah. 

Goshorn.G. v., . . Whiterocks 

Virginia. 

Akers.Dr. R.T., . . Alumridge 
Akers, Washington, Carthage 

Angle, Lee Wirtz 

♦Baker, D., . . Stephens City 

♦Barnhart, A Wirtz 

Barnhart.J. W\, .... Wirtz 
Barnhart, Jeremiah, . . Junta 

Barnhart, O., Hylton 

Beahm, Henry, .... Lowry 
Beahm, I. N. H., . Brentsville 

Beahm, W. E Gillaspie 

Beahm, S. P., . . Bedford City 

Beahm, J. C Brentsville 

Beverage, Josiah, . . Monterey 

Blough,J.E Manassas 

Boon, John O., . . Waidsboro 
Boon, Samuel, . . . Corleyville 
Boothe, Noah, . . . Alumridge 
Bowman, S. I., . Harrisonburg 
Bowman, Peter, . Little River 
Bowman, Daniel, Dillons Mills 

Bowman, Geo., Junta 

Bowman, Isaac Taccio 

Britton, Joseph F., Nokesville 
Brubaker. Louis E., . Hickman 

Brubaker, D. R Salem 

Carroll, Geo., .... Bigtunnel 
Cliambers, Andrew, . Midland 

Clanahan, John 

St. Davids Church 

Click, J. W Bridgewater 

♦Cline, Joseph M., . .Knightly 



Brethren s Family ALmanac, 



39 



Cline.John Longglade 

Cline, Samuel. . Stephens City 
*Connor, Abram, . . Manassas 
Connor, W. K., . Bridgewater 
♦Crumpacker, Saml, Bonsacks 
Cummings, James T., . . Naffs 

Deaton, J. F Cavespring 

Denton, T. C, . . . Daleville 
Dickerson, Moses, Little River 
Dove, Addison, . . Dovesville 

Dove, Geo. L Criders 

Dove, J. A Cloverdale 

♦Driver, Samuel, . New Hope 
Driver, John F., . Timberville 
*Early, H. C, . . Montevideo 
Early, A. B., . . . New Hope 
Early, M. G., • • • Nokesville 
Elgin, WiUiam, .... Charity 

*Eller,J.W Salem 

Eller, C. E Salem 

Eller, D. Newton, . . Daleville 
Fitzwater. S. W., . Dovesville 

♦Flora, Riley Hickman 

Flora, M. A Helms 

Flory, George B., . Lipscomb 

Flory, George B Helms 

Flory, D. C, . . . . Newhope 
Flory, S. H., . . . . Nokesville 
Forrer, John, . . Stuarts Draft 
Foster, Joseph F., . . . Luray 
Fulk, George H., . . . Genoa 
*Garber, Levi, . o Mt. Sidney 
Garber, A. D., . . Mt. Sidney 
Garber, B. F., . . Timberville 
Garber, Jacob, . Greenmount 
*Garber, Peter, Weyers Cave 
Garber, Jacob C, Barrenridge 
Garber, John H., . New Market 

Ghck, Jacob D Lilly 

*Good, M. J., . . Mt. Jackson 
Graybill, George, Brughs Mill 
*Graybill, Jonas, Brughs Mill 
Graybill, Jas. H., . . Roanoke 
Grisso, Jacob, .... Moomaw 

Hall, Wm. I Marysville 

Harman, Ananias, . Abraham 
*Hays, Daniel, . . Broadway 
Hershberger, L A. B., Liberty 
*Ho]singer, JohnS., Nokesville 
Huffman, J. B. F., . Rileysville 

*Hylton, H. P Hylton 

Hylton, Jacob Hylton 

Hylton, Joseph, Pax 

Hylton, Austin Pax 

Hylfon, A. N Hylton 

Ikenberry, Samuel M., . Helms 
*Ikenberry, Henry, . . Wirtz 
Ikenberry. L. D., . . Daleville 
Ikenberry, J. W., . . Daleville 
Jamison, Geo. M., . . . Arritts 
Jamison, John, . . Potts Creek 

John, J. J., Daleville 

*Kagey, Jos, M., . . . Dayton 
Kagey, A. J.. . . Mt. Jackson 

Keith, Jacob Fo, „ . Campcreek 
Keifh, Z., ...... . Santos 

Kendig, E. D., . Stuarts Draft 
*Kendig, J. R., . Stuarts Draft 
Kirakofe, B. A., . . . . Stover 

■Kline, M. B. E., . . Broadway 
Kline, John H., Cowans Depot 



Kline, J.Sam'l, . . .Broadway 

Layman, J. T Daleville 

Leedy, John H., . Toms Brook 
Leftwich, J. P. . . . Gillaspie 

Lewis, J. G., Medina 

*Long, Em., . . . Bridgewater 
Long, Isaac S., . . Goods Mills 
*May, Siram, . . . Dovesville 
Miller, Isaac A., . . . . Stover 
Miller, B. B., . . Greenmount 

*Miller, P. S Roanoke 

*Miller, John A., Bridgewater 
*Miller, Daniel, Weyers Cave 
Miller, Joseph M., . . Ottobine 
Miller, Joseph A., . Sangerville 
Miller, Anthony A., Sangerville 
*Miller, Benj., . . Greenmount 
Miller, Samuel T., . Stonewall 

Miller, S. D Mt. Sidney 

*Miller, Hiram G., Bridgewater 
Montgomery, Benj., Eaglerock 
Montgomery, Chas. S., Helms 
Montgomery, Abraham S., . 

........... Helms 

*Moomaw, B. F., . . Bonsacks 
Moomaw, Kenton B., . . . . 

Indianrock 

Mowry, HughR., . Saumesville 
Moyer, H., . . c . . Dovesville 
*Myers, Isaac C, Greenmount 

Naff, CD., Salem 

Naff, Benjamin T., . Hernando 
*Naff, Daniel, ...... Naffs 

*Naff, W. H., . . .Little River 

*Naff, John Salem 

Neff, Isaac M., . . Forestville 
*Neff, B. W„ . . Mt. Jackson 
Nezzelrodt, Chas 

. Shenandoah Alum Springs 
Oberlin, Allen A., . . Norfolk 
Painter, Geo. W., . . . Koontz 
Pence, J., Meyerhoeffers Store 
*Peters, Daniel, .... Helms 
Peters, Riley L., . . . .Helms 
Peters, Wm., Seven Fountains 
Petry, Samuel, . . Goods Mills 
Phillips, Geo. A. . Hermitage 
Powel, E. M., . . . . Chestnut 
*Pursley, A. F., . . Buchanan 
*Pursley, W.T., Saltpeter Cave 

Racer, John A Kimball 

*Reed, Isaac, . . .' Alumridge 
Reed, Henry, . . . Alumridge 
Reed, Noah, .... Alumridge 
Reed, Samuel P., . Alumridge 
Reed, Wyatt, . . . Alumridge 
Richard, A., . . . Woodstock 
Roller, M. J., . . New Market 
Roller, J. Samuel, New Market 
*Rothgeb, Mart., Massanutton 
Ryman, John L., . Saumsville 
♦Sanger, S. F., . . . Manassas 
♦Sanger, S, A., . . . Scottsford 
Sanger, Martin G., Sangerville 
Sergeon, Stephen, . Jonesville 
♦Shaver, S. A., . . Maurertown 
Shaver, Isaac, . . . Copperhill 

Shickel, Jos Roanoke 

Showalter, P. H., . . Scottsford 
Smith, T.M.,. . .Wolf Glade 
Sours, H. F., . . . . . Long 
Spangler, S. G., . Floyd C. H. 



Spangler, John, . . . Huffville 
♦Spitler, Samuel, .... Long 
Spitzer, G. C, . . Bridgev/ater 
Strickler, Walter, . . . Luray 

Strole, M. L H[oneyville 

♦Thomas, Jacob, . Springcreek 
Thomas, Abram, Springcreek 
Thomas, P. S., . Harrisonburg 

Tow, William, Cana 

♦Turner, Daniel, Cootes Store 

Varner, Wm Doehill 

♦Wakeman. J. W., Harrisville 
Wampler, JosephW., . Edom 

Wayland.J. W.,Jr 

Bridgewater 

♦Weddle, Harvey . . Topeco 
Weddle,Joel, . . Burks Fork 
Weddle, Andrew J., . .Santos 
Weimer, Dennis, . . Bealton 
♦Wenger, Levi A., Mt. Sidney 
Whitmer, David, . . Buckhall 
Wickham, L. D., . . . . Pilot 

Williams, C. A Salem 

♦Wine, Geo. W., . . Ottobine 
Wine, Jacob, .... Ottobine 
Wine, D. P., . . Moores Store 
Wine, W. M., . . Winchester 
Wood, T. C, Whittles Station 
Wood, Chas. H., . . Snowden 

Wright, A. T Deerfield 

Yankey, F. A., .... Criders 
Yount, W. B., . . Bridgewater 
♦Zigler, Samuel, . . . Mayland 
Zigler, Samuel D., . . Mayland 
♦Zigler, John P., . . Mayland 
Zigler, D.C., .... Stover 

Zigler, D. H Mayland 

♦Zimmerman, Jacob, Mt. Solon 

Washington. 

Andrews, M.E., . Oysterville 
Forney, Samuel, . . Mondovi 
Hopkins, Ernest, . . . Dayton 

♦Ives, Allen Centralia 

Stiverson, J. U. G., Oysterville 

West Virginia. 

♦Abernathy, I. W., . . Wilson 
Abernathy, J. W., . . .Wilson 
♦Annon, Zechariah, Thornton 
♦Annon, G. W., . . . Thornton 
Argabright, I. H., . • Newhope 

Arnold, John A Eglon 

♦Arnold, D. B., . . Burlington 
♦Arnold, G. S., . . Burlington 
♦Arnold, Peter, . . Burlington 

Arnold, Albert S Eglon 

Arnold, A. W., . . Purgitsville 
Arnold, D. E., . . Purgitsville 
Baker, Raphael, . . . Bayard 
Baker, John K., . . . Antioch 

Ball, John M Thornton 

Barnes, F., . . . Brandonville 

Barnes, John, Soho 

Beery, Jacob D Augusta 

Beverage, Levi, . . Cloverhck 
Biser, Solomon, . . Burlington 
Bond, Thomas, . Frenchcreek 
♦Bosely, David, . . . Bulltown 
Bowers, Philander, . FrankUn 
Bricker, G. W., . . Darkesville 
Brindle, John, . . Martinsburg 



♦Burk, Charles, . New Interest 
♦Caldwell, L. D., . . Mathias 
♦Clark, Dennis, . . Maysville 
Claypool. H. S., Saltlick Bridge 
♦Cochran, Martin, c . Tollgate 
Collins, Benj., . . . Greenbank 
Cook, A. L., . o . Petersburg 
♦Cusner, J.T. . . .Bismarck 
Cosner, Wm. H., . . Bismarck 

Crouse, J.M OakhilL 

Czigans, Milton, . . . Auburn 
Dickson, H., ..... Franklin 

♦Duncan, A. B Oakhill 

Ebert, Otis Greenland 

Evans, Alex., . , Fayetteville 
Everts, J. D., . Wilsons Mills 

Fike, Emra T Eglon 

Fike, Samuel K., .... Eglon 

Fike, Johns Egloq 

♦Fike, Tobias S., . . Brooksida 

Fike, Moses Egloq 

♦Fike, Aaron, ..... Egloq 

♦Fike, Jonas Egloq 

♦Fike, S. A . Egloq 

Fisher, Perry A., . St. Albans 
Fleming, Jas. W., Purgitsville 
Fleshman, L. A., . . Lindside 
Flory, N. B., . . Pleasantdale 

♦Frantz, J. C Laureldale 

Frantz, Abram, . . . Dawson 
♦Friedly, John, . . Gooseneck 
George, T. Ezra, . . . Antioch 

♦George, Wm Martin 

Glen, John, . . . Wardensville 

♦Groves, C. M Overhill 

Guthrie, Joseph, . . Hazelton 
Hamstead, Obed, . . . Eglon 

♦Harman, Asa, 

Hieshman, Geo., Wardensville 

♦Hinegardner, B. D 

Lost River 

Hockman, John, Pleasantdale 
Holsberry, J. K., . Nestorville 
Hutchinson, Geo. . . Lindside 
Jamieson, B. F., . . . . Copen 

Kelley, H. N Burlington 

Kirk, D. W ,. . Colfax 

♦Leatherma ., J. M., Purgitsville 
♦Leatherman, Geo. W.,Keyser 
Leatherman, J. N., Purgitsville 

Mathias, S Lost River 

McMahon, John Alton 

♦xMiller, David J., . . OverhiU 
Miller, Lorenzo H., Lost River 

Miller, J. M Eglon 

Moss, Owen C. Duffy 

Moyer, Moses, .... Mathias 
Murphy, Wm. R., . . Bulltown 
Murphy, Geo. E., . . Bulltown 
Nicola, C. G., . . . . Nicklow 
Nine, W. F., . . . . Gormania 

PhiUips, Wm. B Texas 

Poling, Godfrey J., . . Kasson 
Pope, J. W., . . . . Moorefield 
Puffenbarger, A,, . Sugargrove' 
Reed, Ross E., . Morgantown 
Richardson, J., . Meadowbluff 
Riggleman, John, . Bluespring 
♦Riner, Samuel, . . . Oakhill 
Rinker, Nicholas, . . Dobbin 
Rotruck, W. D Anti^;b 



40 



Brethren's Family Almanac. 



Satterfield, B. F., . . . Mayton 
Shahan, George, . HannahviJle 
*Shafcr,W. H., Valley Furnace 
Sines, Emmanuel, . . Canaan 
♦Smith, B. W., . Barnes Mills 
Starkey, J. H., . . Griffithsville 
Teats, L. W Lost River 



*Thomas, Jer., . Clifton Mills 

Tilsman, A. L Lindside 

Turner, John H., Martinsburg 

Utz, J, H Martinsburg 

Wells, J. M Kalamazoo 

Wilfong, Benjamin, . . Edray 
Wilt, Lloyd., . Bentons Ferry 



Wilmoth, William, 

Top of Alleghany 

Wilson, Josiah, . . . Belington 
Wilson, James, . . . Wilmoth 

Wisconsin. 

*Baker, H. C, , . East Pepin 
Baker, Samuel H., . Ludington 







Bowman, Eli, . . 


. . Came \ 


*Crist, Samuel . 


Menomc ' 


*Honberger, S. A 


, . . Bai 1 


Joyce, E. E., . . 


. RedCc 


Fatten, John, . . 


. . Stai 


Shepherd, John, . 


. Ashri 


VanBuren, T. D., 


. . .Sta; \ 



Dr. Peter's Blood Vitalizer 

is not a so-called patent medicine— not a cure-all— but a reliable household remedy, ca 
fully compounded from medicinal herbs, leaves, roots, barks, etc , according to the p 
scription of a learned Swiss-German physician, which has been handed down from fat! 
to son for three successive generations. 

Dr. JPeter^s Blood Vitalizer is an article of acknowledged merit. It is distinc 
different from all other medicines. It may have its imitations, but it has no substitute, 
not only expels the disease from the body, but it creates new, rich, red blood, and sou 
solid, healthy flesh. It has won its way into popular favor without gaudy newspaper!, 
vertising, solely on its own merits. \ 



It Purifies the Blood. 
It Acts upon the Liver. 
It Acts upon the Kidneys. 
It Promotes Digestion. 
It Regulates the Bowels. 



It Quiets the Nervous System. 

It Nourishes, Strengthens and Invig= 

orates. 
It Opens the Pores of the Skin and 

Induces Healthy Perspiration. 



In short, it is a family medicine in every sense of the word, and ought to be found 
every household. It is pleasant to take and absolutely harmless. It is not sold by dn 
gists, but only by local Vitalizer agents or the proprietor direct. 

Dr. Peter Fahrney, 112=114 South Hoyne Ave., Chicago, Hi. 



The STUDEBAKERr" *onrc*:„C^°" 




...CONSTRUCTION... 

AXLES, Indiana Black Hickory, straight grainei 
SKEINS, Cast or Steel, take in more axle wood 

others. 
SPOKES, Slope Shouldered, Indiana White Oak. 
HUBS, Patent, Oil Mountain Black Birch, are ■ 

proof. 

TIRES, Patent Round Edge, Welded on. 
GEARS, Soaked in Boiling Oil, Moisture Proof. 
I'AINTING, only Best Oils, handsome finish. 

Hitch to a ♦♦ Studebaker** and 



SAVE 



- *^^^*^ 



YOUR Team, Repai 
Time, Money, Patien 

>ery Wagon guaranteed. E 

promise made good. If not on sale jn ; 
town, write direct to 

Studebaker Bros. Mfg. Co. 

South Bend, Indiana. 



IF YOU READ 



The Gospel Messenger you 
have learned much of the farm 
life combined with town life the Brethren lead on the 
Dos Palos Colony. If you wish to learn more, write 
to the Rev. A. P. Reed, to Elder A. Julius, or to 
B. Marks, Dos Palos, Merced County, Californiao 



The Annual Meeting for 1894 



.WILL BE HELD AT... 



ROANOKE, VA., 

Beginning Tuesday, May 23, 1899 




MANCHESTER COLLEGE LIBRARY 



3 9315 01027608 4 




' "^^ *^ '^ *^ '^^ *^ «#^ 

^ Manchester College ^. 




j^ Brethren Historical ^ 
Library |i 



» 
b 



NORTH MANCHESTER, IMD. 



♦^ '^' -^^ ^^#» '^ "^ '^ 



>2